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  1. #1
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    Default fast drop vs slow drop

    Anyone mind telling me the pros and cons of each? and when to use each?
    So far I figured
    slow = tight to net
    fast = further from net, but forces opponent to move faster

    I figured you could disrupt your opponents timing if you play slow drops against attacking players and fast drops against defensive players.

    Also, how do you attack well against someone who almost always clears and lifts?

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    i dont have a good answer.. but if anybody is going to do slow drops (especially from back court) they gotta be careful.. if its a tiny bit too far it'll get killed
    about person who always clears/lifts, i guess you can alternate between clearing and dropping until they're tired from running forwards and backwards since he always hits long shots you wont really have to move

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    Fast drops are sort of semi-smashes with less power but you pin it where the opponent is empty in. slow drops are more from the back court and it is also trying to pin the empty spot but are generally easier to get.

    About the type of player who drops and clears repetively (VERY frustrating), you have to beat them in foot work and clears. Force the opponent back. The further he is from the net, the more time you have to get the drop/smash and are generally less accurate. However, the key is getting the first oppertunity to attack. Clear side to side and drop in various places BEFORE your opponent. If you wait for your opponent to attack first, you must be a better player than that person.

    Jope this helps ^^

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    Is there one type of drop generally used more than the other? I usually do slow and tight drops,but they never win me the point, but they often force lifts. The faster drop wins me more points but it seems that if I do that shot, I dont have time to return to base, and they often drive or drop it back to me. Which makes me lose the point more often.

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    Quote Originally Posted by checkthemc
    Is there one type of drop generally used more than the other? I usually do slow and tight drops,but they never win me the point, but they often force lifts. The faster drop wins me more points but it seems that if I do that shot, I dont have time to return to base, and they often drive or drop it back to me. Which makes me lose the point more often.
    From my experience slow and tight drops make the opponent lunge to return the bird, in doing so, they miss, drop, or they lift it. During this lift you have to attack it; I think the whole point of dropping isn't only to make the opponent move, but also to create an opportunity for a lift so that you can end it.

    As for the fast drop they're used for when your opponent seems to be off balance or they're really far back and you want to end it without giving them time to react. Either learn to make a fast drop as close to the net as possible, (You might want to try jumping to get the angle) or when you do the fast drop immediately after contact go back to base but you'll have to practice your footwork so that you'll be able to *Chasse* (Not sure if that's the right term) quickly to the new direction the bird travels in order to counter the drive.

    Sorry if I don't help too much, this is from my experience, but i'm not that great but I tried
    Last edited by Rezokeun; 04-02-2005 at 12:31 AM.

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    There are two types of drop shots-fast and slow. There are two variants of the fast drop, the normal type and the slicing type, the latter is also known as the cut smash and is most deceptive.
    Drops are generally played from behind the doubles back service line. The fast ones are steeply angled drops that land near the front service line, and are primarily used in mixed doubles by the man. The slow ones land within a foot of the net, and are used mainly in men's, ladies'doubles and in singles.. Their main purpose is as a means to sustain an attack when you are too far back in court to smash, although they can sometimes by themselves be winners. Oftentimes a poor return from your drop is an invitation for you to finish it off with a smash. In this case, the preceding drop is the hero, not the finishing smash.

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    Quote Originally Posted by checkthemc
    Anyone mind telling me the pros and cons of each? and when to use each?
    So far I figured
    slow = tight to net
    fast = further from net, but forces opponent to move faster

    I figured you could disrupt your opponents timing if you play slow drops against attacking players and fast drops against defensive players.

    Also, how do you attack well against someone who almost always clears and lifts?
    Your attack does not need to always be smashing the birdie. A good Defense and the best offense in badminton I think. Best way to attack against someone who clear and drop is use counter attack. If the opponent clear alot, that should give you plenty of time to get in position to smash, drop and clear...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greasemonkey
    Your attack does not need to always be smashing the birdie. A good Defense and the best offense in badminton I think. Best way to attack against someone who clear and drop is use counter attack. If the opponent clear alot, that should give you plenty of time to get in position to smash, drop and clear...
    In singles, the attacking clear is the primary weapon to set you up for the coup-de-grace. How can you counter attack a good attacking clear which will stretch your limbs so far back and at such speed, that you will have to be very good to just get yourself out of trouble?

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    Quote Originally Posted by taneepak
    In singles, the attacking clear is the primary weapon to set you up for the coup-de-grace. How can you counter attack a good attacking clear which will stretch your limbs so far back and at such speed, that you will have to be very good to just get yourself out of trouble?
    Agreed. One should make a lot of attacking clears to force the opponent quickly in a bad situation. I do high clear to slow down the game or get myself back from a bad situation. Ugh, I really need to practice the angles of my clears....

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    At high levels of play, fast drops are used much more than slow drops. Watch the professional players carefully when they receive a drop shot; look at their posture and their feet. You will notice that they are taking the shuttle somewhat low and away from the net, because they are receiving a fast drop. This is especially clear in singles, where the fast drop is used to the near total exclusion of slow drops.

    Slow drops are dangerous against a fast player. He will kill the shuttle unless it is very tight to the net. In singles, even the tightest slow drop will be met by a tumbling net shot, which will probably end the rally.

    Slow drops do have a place, however. They are excellent shots in doubles when played from further forward - for example, from the midcourt when the shuttle is too low to smash, or as an interception by the net player.

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