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  1. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveStanley
    I agree with Jamesd20 and Mag, we need companies to compete with Yonex, even to beat them. Yonex has been dominating the badminton market forever, and this is not good at all.
    I also completely agree with this statement. Yonex needs to get threatened to focus more. Companys like Carlton, Forza, Wilson and even Prince are growing in market and we are getting proffesional players using them. Here are a few examples: Nathan Robertson and Gail Emms = Carlton, Rikke Olson = Forza, Aamir Ghaffar = Wilson. If Carlton and Forza in particualar get some top proffesional players sponsored by them it will surely boost the markets and put Yonex in the position to focus more to create top brand rackets (Carlton have already achieved this by Robertson and Emms being Mixed Doubles no1 and Peter Rasmussen World Champion). If we can prove to America that badminton is just as good sport as tennis then it will spread to a major sport.

  2. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwun
    yes. that's exactly what i tried to address in my article. it is a vicious cycle, or a chicken-n-egg problem. no money means no popularity, no popularity means no money.

    my suggestion in the article to break the cycle is simply for Yonex to throw in the money. take a small gamble. afterall, they are the biggest and most wealthy company on earth who has an intimate interest with badminton.

    and as Jumpalot says, and i wholeheartedly agree 100%: money is the key here. Yonex has done very little to promote the sport in the US, it is a huge market to be explored, if they decide to do it, they will enjoy the result, and badminton will be popular.
    Money makes the world go round. =/

    The American market is full of potential if badminton was able to get into it. As stated by lots of people in this discussion, Yonex needs to step up and haggle some Americans for air-time of badminton on TV or find some way to make it popular.

    Although... an obvious sign that airing on TV is not doing much is the athens olympics. I believe in the US, they aired more badminton than even in Canada and yet still people are oblivious to it. The popularization of the sport through TV did not change much even when they put the badminton at primetime. Badminton as a sport needs to be pounded into the American market and media more so more and more people can have the opportunity to see the sport in its actual form.

  3. #54
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    i think what matters also is the type of telecast.if the matches are telecasted on tv using only a single or just 2 cameras,then to the general audience it would get too monotonous after they watch it for say about an hour or so.but if the telecast is done using using 8-12 cameras to capture all types of motion then it suddenly looks like a different game altogether!!!! and easily attracts the general audiences.[that's what we need]

    i am not really blaming the players,but it would help if they could speak english[which most of them dont] for post match conferences,etc.

  4. #55
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    Quote " too bad the westerners think it's an asian sport when badminton was founded in england, by an english fella, dominated by non asian for more than 50 years."

    Badminton was actually first invented in India. It was called "poona". What an ugly and low-class sounding name. It was only later brought to England where it is named " Badminton" --- sounds much better.

  5. #56
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default India & China can jointly ignite World Badminton

    I agree with DaN fAn that India can be a good complement to China in igniting the badminton game worldwide.

    Yes India, thanks to British colonization, has the advantage of English being spoken and understood by many of its people. Therefore India can capture the attention of the English speaking world which dominates television and business. But in terms of business, India has opened up its economy not very long ago and I think it came later than China. Nevertheless, because of English, India is fast catching up and seems to be incomparable in its IT software industry. But don't underestimate the Chinese resolve to pick up English in preparation for the Beijing Olympics in 2008!

    Together with China, India is the other fastest growing economy in Asia, where business growth is still tops and continues to attract worldwide participation. Both have huge populations. When incomes rise, so will the middle-class and this can help raise the profile of the badminton game which is popular in both countries. But somehow, China is able to produce many more world-class players compared with India. I suppose China's government and badminton authorities are more passionate about the game and take pains to nurture and develop their talents at a much earlier age.

    As I have said previously, I think the likely sponsors will initially come from the local big boys, commercial houses which have been very successful at home and wanting to expand overseas and using badminton as a stepping stone. So both local and foreign badminton activities can benefit if big corporations in China and India want to join the global community.

    But the Indian badminton authorities will have to pull up their socks and make real attempts to develop their local badminton talents quickly so that they can match the best from China, Indonesia, Denmark, Malaysia and now Thailand. Then only will Indian companies be attracted to help them develop the game further.

    It seems unlikely that the US, Canada and other countries in the West are too interested in badminton in the foreseeable future as they are now more preoccupied in other more popular and successful sports which can turn in more profits much faster. Not unless the badminton authorities there decide that they want to be in the same mould as China, Indonesia and Malaysia!
    Last edited by Loh; 04-16-2005 at 12:06 PM.

  6. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaN_fAn
    i am not really blaming the players,but it would help if they could speak english[which most of them dont] for post match conferences,etc.
    Of course it would be great to hear it from the horses' mouths and as to the language medium, it depends on who the audience is. You speak English to a non-English audience such as in China, then they will not appreciate.

    Furthermore, a good interpreter can be used and it all boils down to good preparation by the media companies, just as your suggestion to use many more cameras to capture the action on court in different angles, elevations and compositions. Just think of Italian and Spanish soccer to the English speaking public. Although the star players or coaches spoke in their native languages, the interpreters can still make the interviews interesting.

    In addition, a good commentator, preferably one who is very knowledgeable on the game such as top-class player, will definitely add greater interest to the proceedings.

    On this subject, I thoroughly enjoyed Kenneth Jonassen's profound insights and analysis when he was invited to join in the live commentary during the Japan Open 2005 Finals. Kenneth was knocked out by Lin Dan during the Semi-Finals (?) and his voice was heard live and what a difference it made to the commentary!
    Last edited by Loh; 04-16-2005 at 12:35 PM.

  7. #58
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    I agree with Kwun, but i also disagree.

    i am betting that badminton will rise within 20 years: why? The answer is so simple, yet alot of people didnt think about it yet: China.

    China has one of the fastest growing economies. Soon, it will catch up to US, and most likely be a world power in terms of wealth. If this happens, China is going to make contributions to making sports such as badminton , ping pong, or anything they are a World power at. i am not confident about this rise of badminton, but one thing for sure is that China WILL be a world power in economy, and when that happens, badmitnon JUST might pick up popularity around the world.

    Edit: Damn u Dan Fan, u beat me
    Last edited by New_Guy04; 04-17-2005 at 01:06 AM.

  8. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by New_Guy04
    I agree with Kwun, but i also disagree.

    i am betting that badminton will rise within 20 years: why? The answer is so simple, yet alot of people didnt think about it yet: China.

    China has one of the fastest growing economies. Soon, it will catch up to US, and most likely be a world power in terms of wealth. If this happens, China is going to make contributions to making sports such as badminton , ping pong, or anything they are a World power at. i am not confident about this rise of badminton, but one thing for sure is that China WILL be a world power in economy, and when that happens, badmitnon JUST might pick up popularity around the world.

    Edit: Damn u Dan Fan, u beat me
    Unfortunately if China becomes a world leader they would just try and excel in sports once dominated by the western world such as basketball, baseball, tennis, golf and soccer to proof that they have arrived as a super power in sports as well. As far as badminton goes, you cant play it unless you hear about it. And in North America, your chance of hearing about and actually play it is extremely small regardless how strong China becomes.

  9. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by taneepak
    I think Yonex or for that matter many others know about the North American market potential. I think they are wise not to throw money down the drain. Their investments are based on very sound principles. The money-investments-go where there is an established market. Badminton was big time in Malaysia, India, Denmark and Indonesia long before Yonex came along. These countries made Yonex and Yonex latched on to a good thing. Sponsors are not "market makers". They lubricate the sports they choose to give them an edge. It is the sport that makes sponsors.
    For example, lets take badminton in China. This game was never heard of before the exodus of Indonesian Chinese badminton players who fled Indonesia for to China. The game took off big because of the Chinese government's desire to gain respect and prestige through sports-pioneered by the 'Ping Pong' diplomacy-at a time when it was isolated by the western world. Every single victory in badminton gave birth to millions of new Chinese badminton converts who were fired up by an intense desire to avenge past wrongs and gain some international respect.
    I don't know what will fire up the American badminton scene. Certainly the Chinese experience will not work. The answer may be closer to what made basketball, baseball or American football all the rage there. For Yonex to pour money into North America in the absence of a sizeable core business there could result in Yonex going the way of Dunlop Maxply.
    It is "almost" logical to not put in money and promote badminton since the market is too small. But as a company who owns almost all of the market in the world, they ought to do more for the sport than just continue to profit and not give anything back to the sport that made them who they are today. Yonex as we all know is a company that is not only completely dominant in badminton, they are also very successful in tennis and golf. To think that Yonex may go under by simply promoting badminton in north america with alot of money would put them in financial trouble is just unreasonable.

    As far a role of the sponsor, lets put it this way, without them the sport will not be seen or grow. TV programs are aired based on how many viewers and how much commercials they can sell. To put it simply, without big money, badminton will not be seen or heard in the media. Where is the source of big money might come from? I certainly cant think of anyone that is capable of coming up with millions except a company that is already making multi-miillions from this great sport. Why would it be wrong to say that they shouldnt sponsor badminton with million dollar tournaments in north america? The money is going to create amazing amount of interest from everyone including people who know nothing about badminton. How many times have we watched something on TV just because there is a big $$$$ for the winner? Also the money is going to badminton players ! The TV coverage is going to make Yonex even more famous and they will actually make alot more money if the badminton market is expanded. The market potential in norht america is greater than any place in this world. People are already rich in north america unlike China or India where the average people are still quite poor and may have to wait 20 years to catch up to USA.

    Finally, all is needed is more promotion and once again more INTEREST from the public. As far as promoting badminton, the only change I would propose is to add more breaks in a match so there is time for commercials to play in a TV broadcast. In today's format, even if badminton becomes popular and if a company like Coke or Pepsi want to buy commercial time during a badminton finals they would only have very limited chances to air their commercials. This has to change sooner or later as we all know in todays market there needs to be tons of commercials slots and we all have to watch countless number of commercials by the time we finish watching the Super Bowl or NBA Final.
    Last edited by Jumpalot; 04-17-2005 at 07:32 AM.

  10. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by taneepak
    I think Yonex or for that matter many others know about the North American market potential. I think they are wise not to throw money down the drain. Their investments are based on very sound principles. The money-investments-go where there is an established market. Badminton was big time in Malaysia, India, Denmark and Indonesia long before Yonex came along. These countries made Yonex and Yonex latched on to a good thing. Sponsors are not "market makers". They lubricate the sports they choose to give them an edge. It is the sport that makes sponsors.
    For example, lets take badminton in China. This game was never heard of before the exodus of Indonesian Chinese badminton players who fled Indonesia for to China. The game took off big because of the Chinese government's desire to gain respect and prestige through sports-pioneered by the 'Ping Pong' diplomacy-at a time when it was isolated by the western world. Every single victory in badminton gave birth to millions of new Chinese badminton converts who were fired up by an intense desire to avenge past wrongs and gain some international respect.
    I don't know what will fire up the American badminton scene. Certainly the Chinese experience will not work. The answer may be closer to what made basketball, baseball or American football all the rage there. For Yonex to pour money into North America in the absence of a sizeable core business there could result in Yonex going the way of Dunlop Maxply.
    they did a good investment in the late 70's / early 80's, i agree. at that time, there are only a few badminton companies in the countries you mentioned. and surely, Yonex has grown and dominated in those places.

    however, that was 20 yrs ago. the sales of Yonex racket has not increased significantly in the past few years. the output has pretty much been constant. now, Yonex is a public traded company and shareholders expect the company to not be in a stand-still. but instead to grow to make the company a good investment.

    they can certainly continue to promote sports in these current market, but imho, the market in asia imho has already been saturated. the largest and more lucrative market is the US and Europe. without any drive to boost popularity in these countries, there will be no increase in demand nor sales. Yonex needs to start thinking about promoting badminton to the masses. let the average European and American family learn about this cool sport. curiosity and knowledge will drive demand, and profit will come sooner or later. there will be risk, of course, but no investment come with zero risk. it is usually the ones who take the risk who yield the best reward.

    someone also mentioned IBF, the IBF is definitely a body who should be responsible to promote badminton as well. but we must understand that the IBF is poor. they have limited funding and will not be able to afford the high cost of marketing a sport in these developed countries.

    having said that, i think Yonex has already missed the boat this year already. up till now, i have heard NOTHING via the mass media about the world championship in Anaheim. i am sure it will be a sell out stadium with many people in the US/Canada/rest-of-the-world who will go and watch, but it will only be limited to the existing badminton community. without attracting new fans, there is still no growth.

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    Default speedminton

    Speedminton is doing something that Yonex should be doing.... That is put badminton on TV and get a famous star to promote badminton.

    http://www.mariaworld.net/speedminton.htm

    Check out the video. Its kinda cool and it makes me want to try it!

  12. #63
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    At least one thing I can be proud of is that my company (Siam Cement Group) is the big sponsor of the Thailand open. But still, I agree that we need to gain more popularity. During the competition, they had live broadcast on TV for the finals and the game wasn't even finished but they cut it short coz they ran out of braodcasting time! I don't see this happen in other sports like soccer or basketball.

  13. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dokkaew
    At least one thing I can be proud of is that my company (Siam Cement Group) is the big sponsor of the Thailand open. But still, I agree that we need to gain more popularity. During the competition, they had live broadcast on TV for the finals and the game wasn't even finished but they cut it short coz they ran out of braodcasting time! I don't see this happen in other sports like soccer or basketball.
    Yes, the more sponsors other than Yonex, can really make Yonex sit up and be wary that there are other competitors willing to help promote local badminton. More competitors will force Yonex to up their offers in terms of benefits and prize monies.

    The 5* Singapore Open last year had Aviva, a foreign multinational insurance company, eclipsing Yonex as the main sponsor. I think Aviva will continue to be the main sponsor for this year again.

    Now it is important that the local national badminton assoiciations (NBAs)show interest and commitment to build up a strong team which can produce results. Then this will make their job of attracting other commercial organizations like Siam Cement and Aviva to play a part in promoting the game much more easier. Thailand has produced results, so does Singapore.

    So the NBAs will need to work hard to market thier 'products' to prospective sponsors and sell the idea of a mutually beneficial relationship.

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    Now, if you know the reason why every kindergarten, primary school, high school or college in North America does not have at least one badminton court to every 100 students, you probably have the answer why badminton is not big time there. Any moves to make the sport popular must come from the grassroots. If the schools don't do it, you think Yonex is foolish enough to be a misguided 'Santa Claus'? As I said earlier, sponsors are not 'market makers'. Market makers are people like us. If every American parent will go out of their way to buy their kids a racquet each, help build more courts, hire more coaches, have their lives revolve around badminton, this will do it. It is after all grassroots. But then the big question-why should they do it? I don't see Yonex or other sponsors having a role here. Sponsors will come later, begging and fighting to give you bags of money.

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    Quote Originally Posted by taneepak
    Now, if you know the reason why every kindergarten, primary school, high school or college in North America does not have at least one badminton court to every 100 students, you probably have the answer why badminton is not big time there. Any moves to make the sport popular must come from the grassroots. If the schools don't do it, you think Yonex is foolish enough to be a misguided 'Santa Claus'? As I said earlier, sponsors are not 'market makers'. Market makers are people like us. If every American parent will go out of their way to buy their kids a racquet each, help build more courts, hire more coaches, have their lives revolve around badminton, this will do it. It is after all grassroots. But then the big question-why should they do it? I don't see Yonex or other sponsors having a role here. Sponsors will come later, begging and fighting to give you bags of money.
    I can see where you are coming from but some points must be noted. True, people are what drives the economy but people are driven by needs and wants to buy products. needs are essentials such as food, water and shelter. However, wants are luxuries such as televisions etc. We satisfy our wants because of marketing. Companies advertise their products and generally, we purchase it. Therefore what badminton really needs is basic - PROMOTION. How often do you see a badminton match broadcasted on terrestial television? How often do you see an advert for a badminton racket? The answers are "not very often". The sport needs to be promoted and we need the players do do more (not only the players but everyone). But the players could certianly do more. They could make visits to schools etc and attend promotional events.

    NB. Why is everyone so caught up in the average american person? America does not drive the world and if one read this article they would think there would be no world without america. Take soccer/football for example. This is arguably the most popular sport in the world and yet, the americans arent interested (the businesses are!). So then, why does badminton need america to become more popular????

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    General Foo, I believe i replied to one of your post before..If not, that's fine also..

    Anyway, the reason why I think "everyone" is caught up in mentioning "average american person" or why you felt America is being mentioned as having "the most potential to invest in badminton" is because most people in the world(whether from Europe or Asia) will realize and admit that U.S. is "arguably the main driving force in this world". Especially if one is looking from the "commercialization power" of the U.S...That's what badminton need..Think about it, what other country put up more "commercialization" other than the U.S.??..With that realization, this is basically the argument, what other country other than the U.S. is capable of promoting badminton "big time"...
    Like Susy Susanti said earlier in one of her interview, she said something in a line like "if U.S. can bring a game like basketball or baseball to the rest of the world, it means it can do the same to badminton. If the U.S. can jumpstart a sport, the rest of the world will follow"...Sorry, i don't recall the link to the post, perhaps Kwun or others can help in giving that link??...

    So, that's why in a "sense", IMO, yes badminton need America to make itself even more popular..

    Quote Originally Posted by General Foo
    NB. Why is everyone so caught up in the average american person? America does not drive the world and if one read this article they would think there would be no world without america. Take soccer/football for example. This is arguably the most popular sport in the world and yet, the americans arent interested (the businesses are!). So then, why does badminton need america to become more popular????

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    I see the need to define 'popular'.
    Badminton is already second most participated sport in the world so in this sense badminton is already 'popular' The other part of 'popularity' is # of people wanna watch it or the audience size which badminton lacks here. By getting US onboard ie, glamoritize it , badminton can be a truly mainstream sport. But............

    U cant really blame yonex because the return on promotional/marketing bucks spent in north american cant compare to asia, ie much cheaper in asia and there are 2.5+ billion of chinese and indian and SE asian vs 0.35 billion canada/US/mexico. That is the bottom line

    Let me give u a mathematical derivation or proof:

    1. marketing and material cost 10x cheaper in asia
    2. population in North American(N.A.) is 10x less than asia

    investment bang for the buck is 100x less attractive in N.A.

    - er
    Last edited by cooler; 04-19-2005 at 03:59 PM.

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