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  1. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by winstonchan
    yes, it's an easy statement to make, whether it's difficult to do, it's up to the american... they can make something easy, they can also make something difficult....

    to make badminton a popular sport in the US, and indeed around the world, someone has to start somewhere.... but it's a teamwork - large corporate sponsors, the local badminton associations (USBF, IBF, etc..), the media, and the government perhaps... my observation is that people START getting interested in a sport because of national pride, so i guess IF an american wins a major GP title, then badminton might get kick-started in America, then the rest (sponsors, media...blah blah blah) will very happily join in.
    back to the same old chicken and the egg circle again.

    u c, sponsors dont join in if badminton ain't popular.

    money don't follow the IF and MIGHT

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    Quote Originally Posted by winstonchan
    ... my observation is that people START getting interested in a sport because of national pride, so i guess IF an american wins a major GP title, then badminton might get kick-started in America, then the rest (sponsors, media...blah blah blah) will very happily join in.
    I think you're still living in the last century (or 2)

    players in mainstream sports hockey, basketball, baseball get traded like bubblegum cards. NHL hockey shut down because of national pride issue National pride my..... Explain to tiger why many many golf clubs ban him in his early years but he kept on training at his expense :rolleyes Yes, tiger wood play golf because national pride LOL. :

    ardy wiranata working in US & canada
    tony G and halim H. in the US
    Mia A in netherland
    rexy S in England
    ex #2 LS KOR in canada
    morten F in MAL, S. africa
    many ex's china(YY, ZJ), KOR working in SG, INA, MAL, AUS, etc
    Yes, national pride, LOL
    Last edited by cooler; 05-04-2005 at 10:44 AM.

  3. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by cooler
    I think you're still living in the last century (or 2)

    National pride my.....

    ardy wiranata working in US & canada
    tony G and halim H. in the US
    Mia A in netherland
    rexy S in England
    ex #2 LS KOR in canada
    morten F in MAL, S. africa
    many ex's china(YY, ZJ), KOR working in SG, INA, MAL, AUS, etc
    Yes, national pride, LOL
    hi cooler man

    What u said was completely and utterly correct, national pride is nothing when there are places for fame and money. But the topic was about starting badminton from zero low (ie a sport of low popularity or regarded as a backyard sport) in a country, not about badminton players career path. How do we attract money and attention from the public to make badminton a popular sport as it is in China, Malaysia, Indonesia, etc...?

    So, going back to popularity of badminton in the US, we have to make the public (the public includes government, corporate sponsors, media, and even young players with great potential and a heart to pick up this sport...) to be interested in Badminton. If the public aren't interested in this sport, having 24 hours badminton on TV won't do anything at all.

    So how about having US Team winning a Tom & Uber Cup, or the Sudirman Cup, if that's too far ahead, an American National winning a MS, MD, WS, WD, MXD title in a GP Tournament, like All England, China Open.... Might that be a start to get the American opening their eyes to badminton in the US...?

    Given that the US has less financial constraints compared to other badminton-popular countries, there is no excuse the American cant discover or develop one individual to be a representative or a pride to their country in Badminton.

    Money, sponsors, media wont fall in until you have that "someone" to arouse the interest of the rest.

  4. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by cooler
    I think you're still living in the last century (or 2)

    players in mainstream sports hockey, basketball, baseball get traded like bubblegum cards. NHL hockey shut down because of national pride issue National pride my..... Explain to tiger why many many golf clubs ban him in his early years but he kept on training at his expense :rolleyes Yes, tiger wood play golf because national pride LOL. :

    ardy wiranata working in US & canada
    tony G and halim H. in the US
    Mia A in netherland
    rexy S in England
    ex #2 LS KOR in canada
    morten F in MAL, S. africa
    many ex's china(YY, ZJ), KOR working in SG, INA, MAL, AUS, etc
    Yes, national pride, LOL
    i tend to agree with cooler, but perhaps without the sarcasm...

    a lot of emphasis has been placed on getting a US Badminton World Champion. some may think that with such a title in US's hand, the popularity of badminton will skyrocket.

    while i don't doubt such a possibility, i doubt the effectiveness of it.

    to get a WC out of US athletes, it will take an amount of work that the current US badminton infrustructure does not support. currently, US Badminton is too fragmented and disorganized to be able to nurture such a WC. furthermore, US is up against many traditionally strong badminton nations with much better grassroot support as well as world leading training staff.

    there are many other countries with much better badminton infrustructure who can't even get to the WC spot. a few countries that comes to mind is Japan, France, Netherlands, Germany, England and in many ways, Malaysia. unfortunately, US won't be next, in fact, they have a long long way to go.

    however, as i understand, many people have put in effort to boost the US training program, and especially in developing a strong grassroot program. i think that is a positive step. i frankly think that these program will be successful in developing a stronger and broader badminton community in the US. but i am afraid to say that i am not holding my breath in seeing a WC coming out of them. the most effective part of these program will be to spread the popularity among youngsters, slowly mends the poor image that badminton has in the sport. and soon one of these avid players will end up in the top marketing management in some big organization and have the right vision, then badminton will make its mark.

    and yes. my point goes back to the same thing, money and marketing will determine the popularity of badminton.

  5. #124
    Regular Member winstonchan's Avatar
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    hi kwun

    Yes i agree to certain extent, we have to look at the problem on a more macro scale. Having an organised structure, working from the grass-root, to develop this sport is most important, i dont deny that. But the utmost factor is, i have to say over and over again, the INTEREST and PASSION of the American public have on this sport. You may also think my mind and believe belongs to the last century or two, but it is true.

    The Chinese are doing so bloody well in this sport because they are passionate over this sport, it's a national pride to them. That's why Badminton is POPULAR in China. Whether the Chinese really have a better structure or more money in developing Badminton than the US potentially has, is arguable. While I really dare not say that the Chinese are doing better than some other countries are in developing badminton as a sport, the Chinese LOVE the sport as much as the Brazilian love soccer.

    Without players who really love the sport, see an interest in it, and really get their arxx up and go to badminton courts instead of picking up a basketball after school or on sunday afternoons, structured training programs, money, good coaches, nicely built facilities, tv coverage, etc...etc... all mean NOTHING.

    So what I have been saying in my previous posts were HOW to arouse America interest and passion on badminton. Having a WC is not the only way. But it is a START perhaps to warm up badminton in US, otherwise i think badminton in the US would remain fragmented as it is for years to come.

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    Quote Originally Posted by winstonchan
    Money, sponsors, media wont fall in until you have that "someone" to arouse the interest of the rest.
    back to the chicken and the egg cycle again.
    youngsters would not consider badminton as a career if the money isnt there.

    look at yao ming and other asian baseball players, they work hard so they can fly over to the US and work for NBA and amercian baseball teams. No national pride here, no national hero to up to, their goal is the US market Yes, chinese players play for national pride, that becoz they can live on their prize and sponsorship, for now. However, do u think american kids trains hard here so they can join the chinese teams?

    although i sounded gloomy but it's not that bad. We dont have to start from scratch, just 1 level above the ground floor US use to dominate the badminton scene. US has a history and grassroots already. Again, it just need leadership to find way to merge their strength together. It's not gonna happen overnite but the sky isnt that dark

  7. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by winstonchan
    hi kwun

    Yes i agree to certain extent, we have to look at the problem on a more macro scale. Having an organised structure, working from the grass-root, to develop this sport is most important, i dont deny that. But the utmost factor is, i have to say over and over again, the INTEREST and PASSION of the American public have on this sport. You may also think my mind and believe belongs to the last century or two, but it is true.
    and how is that going to happen? how is one going to re-program the brain of the general american public? honestly, i don't think a yellow skinned badminton WC will ever do it, if that is even achieveable.

    The Chinese are doing so bloody well in this sport because they are passionate over this sport, it's a national pride to them. That's why Badminton is POPULAR in China. Whether the Chinese really have a better structure or more money in developing Badminton than the US potentially has, is arguable. While I really dare not say that the Chinese are doing better than some other countries are in developing badminton as a sport, the Chinese LOVE the sport as much as the Brazilian love soccer.
    i dare say that the Chinese are doing so well in the sport not because of national pride, but instead because the Chinese government (and Yonex) pays a lot of money to maintain the whole badminton infrustructure in the country, all the way from the city level, to the province level, to the national level, there is government support all the way. that will be completely impossible in the US.

    and as cooler says, national pride is one of them, but being a successful athlete in China has a lot of financial benefits. if they end up inside China, even the dollar amount may be small, it is quite large in Chinese standard. it also provides a gateway to the west, many good Chinese badminton players managed to make a new life in a foreign country. that's a incentive much more than national pride.

    and again, as cooler have pointed out a few times already, i have to point back to my article, which is the very first post in this thread: there is a chicken-n-egg cycle that badminton in stuck in. we need to find a break to break ot of the cycle. the passion and interests of the mass public is one of the most difficult thing to sway.

  8. #127
    Regular Member winstonchan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cooler
    back to the chicken and the egg cycle again.
    youngsters would not consider badminton as a career if the money isnt there.

    look at yao ming and other asian baseball players, they work hard so they can fly over to the US and work for NBA and amercian baseball teams. No national pride here, no national hero to up to, their goal is the US market Yes, chinese players play for national pride, that becoz they can live on their prize and sponsorship, for now. However, do u think american kids trains hard here so they can join the chinese teams?
    I think you got mixed up between seeing badminton as a Sport and seeing badminton as a Career or Business. Yao Ming joins the NBA as a career and getting lots of sponsorship as business. But it is the national pride of China to have Yao in the NBA, and you can't deny the amount of interest and popularity the Chinese had grown in basketball as a Sport. Similarly, since the Chinese had sent their national soccer players to the English Premier League, now they have something called the Chinese Premier League for soccer in China. Why's that...? Because there is Popularity and Interest, hence there comes sponsors and money...

    The player himself or herself may not play the sport for national pride, but more likely for money or career, but it is a fact that gaining a title in a tournament does arouse the interest and sense of pride to a country.

    Quote Originally Posted by cooler
    although i sounded gloomy but it's not that bad. We dont have to start from scratch, just 1 level above the ground floor US use to dominate the badminton scene. US has a history and grassroots already. Again, it just need leadership to find way to merge their strength together. It's not gonna happen overnite but the sky isnt that dark
    I agree with you on this. US badminton is not starting from zero. Interest and popularity is not acheived overnight, but more through a gradual process of training players, winning tournaments, and gaining recognition by the public to accept that badminton is a sport they WANT to play and be good at...
    Last edited by winstonchan; 05-05-2005 at 02:24 AM.

  9. #128
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    hi kwun

    look at the amount of medals that the Chinese have won in the Athens Olympics. Record high. They even won Gold medals in sports that they have never dreamt of in the past - WD in Tennis, Liu Xiang in 110m hurdle, and a Gold for a Mens Rowing pair... etc... etc..

    And YES, i think that helped tennis and atheletics to become popular in China.

    You think these people did it for money and gateway to the west??? You think the government had thrown $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ into training them? What was the incentive for them to win a title?

    Chinese athletes are not as materialistic as you may think they are. After they are famous, then yes you are right, they go out of China and see the world.

    American dont have this incentive, dont need such incentive, a good US badminton player can earn $$$$$$$$$$$$$ by staying home in the US.

    But you need that stupid guy to be interested in badminton in America, to go work hard and win a title or medal for the US, before talking about other things.. Skin color does not matter.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cooler
    I think you're still living in the last century (or 2)

    players in mainstream sports hockey, basketball, baseball get traded like bubblegum cards. NHL hockey shut down because of national pride issue National pride my..... Explain to tiger why many many golf clubs ban him in his early years but he kept on training at his expense :rolleyes Yes, tiger wood play golf because national pride LOL. :

    ardy wiranata working in US & canada
    tony G and halim H. in the US
    Mia A in netherland
    rexy S in England
    ex #2 LS KOR in canada
    morten F in MAL, S. africa
    many ex's china(YY, ZJ), KOR working in SG, INA, MAL, AUS, etc
    Yes, national pride, LOL
    Cooler, all that you have established is that these sports can only succeed as a commercial sport because money is behind it. However, you also mentioned that sponsors dont spend money on badminton and go for "ifs and mights" in your previous posts. Hmmmm.. I have seen you post more questions than solutions. Anyways, proving Money as the driving force behind big sports is in my opinion no big news and not exactly a new discovery. However, trying to find out what is the drving force to make a sport from starting as a "national pride" sport to commercial sport that you will eventually see on TV is the main focus of this thread. At this point, badminton needs to move to "national pride" status before it even has a chance to move to a "commercial" sport status. I have not seen any viable suggestions from you besides things that everyone already know and can't be done without big money. Regarding money you also mentioned that Yonex shouldnt have anything to do with providing that its a foolish business move. All I can see is that you dont believe in the sport of badminton and you dont believe it cansucceed even with money.

    Originally Posted by winstonchan
    ... my observation is that people START getting interested in a sport because of national pride, so i guess IF an american wins a major GP title, then badminton might get kick-started in America, then the rest (sponsors, media...blah blah blah) will very happily join in.

    From what I have read, what Winstonchan is trying to say is that badminton might get more interest if americans would win some of these major tournaments. However, one must admit that the title of these tournaments are no guarantee to stir up interest even if americans were to win them all. In the sports world, you would think US Open would be a big deal. But when badminton is involved, US Open wont get TV time regardless of how many times americans win it. The same could be said of any major IBF tournaments except maybe americans winning the Olympics gold in badminton. Yes, Americans would be interested, and that would be because of "national pride". But it wont get the publicity nearly as much as a gold medal in swimming, track and field or gymanastics. Why? because USA wins so many of them. An extra gold medal means absolutely nothing to USA but it means alot to smaller countries including China who is trying to emerge in the world as the next super power.

    So I hate to burst any bubbles, but the reality is that badminton needs a major "make-over" in USA and it wont happen simply because americans start winning everything in the current state. Yes, it may generate some interest. But it wont make anyone rich from prize money or TV endorsements. After all, where is the glory in terms of american sports these days if you win a major badminton tournament and the prize money you won is less than what a single NBA super star get for playing one game of basketball ??

    In USA at the current rate when there is no money being spent on marketing and no successful outreach to educate the american public about the sports of badminton from IBF, USAB, Yonex.. list goes on. People has to look at the alternatives. In american sports, yes, there is the big money sports that you see everyday. But there are also lots of TV coverages on sports that is purely competitive with very little money. National competition such as College football, basketball, and lots of other events are seen on TV where winners dont get much if anything other than a title. World competitions get coverages as well. This type of TV coverages are what badminton needs to go after at this time.

    Ultimately, I believe there is not enough courts for badminton to expand to a level that we would like to see and be viewed on TV. To simply put, every court that I know in my area is packed with people waiting and wait time could reach over an hour to play one game. There is simply no room for new players. There is no room for kids to learn the sport of badminton. Even if its possible to double the badminton player population in one year, is it possible open the # of courts to support that populaion ? If it is, who is working on that ?? Is there an organized effert to open up more gyms, build more courts, create new badminton programs? After all, if there is just one successful program in every state of USA there would be 50 successful programs !!!!

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    jumpalot

    1. before we all go further, we must define the term 'popular'.
    How popular do u want it to be before we can say badminton is popular. We need benchmark or certain goal before we compare discussion as ur and my definition of popular might be quite different.

    2. i did offered solution, i've point to leadership from the top repeatedly. I have dwell into the subject of $$$ and sponsorship only in respond to other poster's chicken and egg spin cycle.

    3. u said However, trying to find out what is the drving force to make a sport from starting as a "national pride" sport to commercial sport that you will eventually see on TV is the main focus of this thread

    u should know that they are many routes possible to attain a goal. The national pride one is the best but takes the longest. Throwing tons and tons of money at badminton is the quickest. Which one path is the best? everybody will have their opinion.

    4. u said that courts are bursting its seam at the the grassroot level. Ain't this a POSITIVE sign and confirmation of badminton eventual popularity Ain't this is what growing from the grassroot camp want Question is, why ain't sport bodies & the media people know about this huh Back to my point #2, where is the leadership to gather up all these momentum
    Last edited by cooler; 05-05-2005 at 04:01 PM.

  12. #131
    Administrator kwun's Avatar
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    i personally do not think the availability of gym will be an limiting factor. if people find out that gyms are saturated, unless if the location is so expensive thus prohibitive of opening up one, sooner or later, there will be business-savy ppl who sees the potential. for example in the bay area, when popularity grows, the number of gyms grows with it. similarly for Phillippines.

    in other words, if one can make the game popular, then clubs will spring open.

    college sports:

    good point about no money sports like college sports. there are in fact, channels dedicated to college sports. i was flipping through the channels and saw some collegiate swimming competition being broadcasted.

    i think these collegiate sports falls into a different category. they are not totally commercial driven, in fact, there is a limit of endorsement each collegiate athlete can have. they are also not national pride as the competition is only at the national level.

    i think the reason why these sports are broadcasted is because many people can relate to them. either because they used to play such a sport, or they used to go to that particular university, or merely the university is in their home town. there is a sense of relation and support will naturally be given.

    this is of course, based on the fact that they cared about it in the first place. i am not sure how much viewership one would get if they start broadcasting the national badminton collegiate championship.

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    Cooler,

    1. popular is pretty much defined in Kwun's article. However, eventhough most can disagree on the exact definition of "popular" I am sure we can all agree at this time badminton is not popular in north america.

    2. Without going into great details, what do you propose the leadership from the top do ? I think alot of us wants to know. By the way, your proposed solutions is as simple as saying a president in a country should fix all the problems in a given country. I think that line of thinking it's quite naive and unrealistic as we already have seen that there isnt much leadership from the TOP in badminton. Ok, there I have said it. The only things I have heard from the TOP is how they propose to change the game. And for those that have read that thread about proposed changes, they were pretty drastic including changing scoring, lines and service positions and possibly changing badminton as a sport.

    3. "The national pride one is the best but takes the longest." hmmmm... I seem to just quoted your post trashing the theory on national pride and supported commercialization of a sport is the best approach. Plus, if you read my post again I already said that it is obvoius there wont be any big money in the near future to promote badminton, so we will have to look at alternatives.

    4. " u said that courts are bursting its seam at the the grassroot level. Ain't this a POSITIVE sign and confirmation of badminton eventual popularity Ain't this is what growing from the grassroot camp want Question is, why ain't sport bodies & the media people know about this huh Back to my point #2, where is the leadership to gather up all these momentum "

    At this point I would consider lucky just to find an "american" that knows the word BADMINTON. Yes, its a positive sign and the courts are packed, the parking lots are full and the players are waiting to play but guess what, take a look at the players themselves. All the players are either A. Asian Immigrants B. Asian American C. American with Asian friends that play badminton ( and thats pretty rare sighting ) but have you noticed how many "white, black, hispanic, native, non-asian" americans are playing badminton lately? So to answer your questions, yes, its getting popular, but its getting popular in a demographic that badminton is already popular and thats a result of immigration not promotion. Its not a positive sign when you look at who is packing the clubs and gyms since badminton is not getting popular in Main Stream AMERICA. In fact, it has not changed over time at all in Main Stream America media in decades. It is hardly a confirmation of badminton eventual popularity.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kwun
    i personally do not think the availability of gym will be an limiting factor. if people find out that gyms are saturated, unless if the location is so expensive thus prohibitive of opening up one, sooner or later, there will be business-savy ppl who sees the potential. for example in the bay area, when popularity grows, the number of gyms grows with it. similarly for Phillippines.

    in other words, if one can make the game popular, then clubs will spring open.

    college sports:

    good point about no money sports like college sports. there are in fact, channels dedicated to college sports. i was flipping through the channels and saw some collegiate swimming competition being broadcasted.

    i think these collegiate sports falls into a different category. they are not totally commercial driven, in fact, there is a limit of endorsement each collegiate athlete can have. they are also not national pride as the competition is only at the national level.

    i think the reason why these sports are broadcasted is because many people can relate to them. either because they used to play such a sport, or they used to go to that particular university, or merely the university is in their home town. there is a sense of relation and support will naturally be given.

    this is of course, based on the fact that they cared about it in the first place. i am not sure how much viewership one would get if they start broadcasting the national badminton collegiate championship.
    yes, I agree to a certain degree that popularity will create more courts. But lets not forget that its extremely expensive to open new courts and gym time are always limited and potentially have to compete with basketball and volleyball. Ultimately court availability to the public will be a limiting factor for the growth of badminton. For example, if someone were to see a promotion for badminton but unable to find a local court to play in, he / she is very likely to give up. The same result occurs for someone shows up to a very crowded gym and have to wait forever just to play. This is not counting on lack of partner as well as lack of players willing to play with them. We all know how difficult it was to start playing badminton when everyone is better than you and may not want to play with a beginner.
    Regarding new courts being built cause it's more popular, I am quite certain its due to demands from immigration and not really from local "non-asian" community. Whether that will continue for the rest of america, I highly doubt it but remain hopeful.

    As for college sports, there is alot of money in it. It may not be immediate for the athletes but its a major pool where professional teams select their new players. But in general, its true that if there is alot of interest, the sports will be on TV. Why? a simple way to look at it is TV programs will only air anything is if they know they get ratings. Ratings are how TV shows get Sponsors. So if everyone is interested in watching a program, you can expect the show to charge a few million $ for 30 sec commercial. Currently A badminton tournament with little prize money will never ever get on TV unless its the Olympics. Even with that it's usually air at midnight lol. Once again, all one has to do is create interest and make sure there are enough courts available and badminton will have a future in North America.
    Last edited by Jumpalot; 05-05-2005 at 08:15 PM.

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    I consider 'National Pride' as one of the main reasons why certain sports are supported to a level where champions are produced.

    It is National Pride for the US to continue to be top of the table at every Olympics and the government and the local sports authorities will try its level best to ensure this happens.

    It is National Pride for up-and-coming China to try to topple the US in gold medals standings and she will do her utmost to become No.1.

    In tiny Singapore, the government and its people were all glued to the TV to watch Ronald Susilo's fiancee, Li Jiawei, battled it out at table-tennis during the Olympics semi-finals. The entire nation was proud that a Singaporean has reached the SF and was hoping that Jiawei would win at least a bronze after so many barren years.

    When Ronald himself won the Japan Open last year after his All-England semi-final appearance, the entire nation celebrated and badminton became more popular overnight! The schools were abuzz with excitement and badminton was on everyone's lips. This sudden interest in badminton was truly amazing and I'm sure Yonex and other badminton equipment suppliers must have done a roaring business! Of course the media, especially TV, helps in stirring the interest and excitement. The goverment was very happy that a badminton event can help gel the people and bring them together in friendly discussion. This makes for a more harmonious nation and winning brings pride to a nation.

    So I contend that National Pride is an important ingredient.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Loh
    I consider 'National Pride' as one of the main reasons why certain sports are supported to a level where champions are produced.

    It is National Pride for the US to continue to be top of the table at every Olympics and the government and the local sports authorities will try its level best to ensure this happens.

    It is National Pride for up-and-coming China to try to topple the US in gold medals standings and she will do her utmost to become No.1.

    In tiny Singapore, the government and its people were all glued to the TV to watch Ronald Susilo's fiancee, Li Jiawei, battled it out at table-tennis during the Olympics semi-finals. The entire nation was proud that a Singaporean has reached the SF and was hoping that Jiawei would win at least a bronze after so many barren years.

    When Ronald himself won the Japan Open last year after his All-England semi-final appearance, the entire nation celebrated and badminton became more popular overnight! The schools were abuzz with excitement and badminton was on everyone's lips. This sudden interest in badminton was truly amazing and I'm sure Yonex and other badminton equipment suppliers must have done a roaring business! Of course the media, especially TV, helps in stirring the interest and excitement. The goverment was very happy that a badminton event can help gel the people and bring them together in friendly discussion. This makes for a more harmonious nation and winning brings pride to a nation.

    So I contend that National Pride is an important ingredient.
    SG is slightly different from the larger USA. Being a small country where they don't dominate many things internationally, singaporian really relish on the any accomplishment of their countrymen / countrywomen. If kevin han win a MS gold at athen 2004 or gunawan/bach win gold MD in this coming WC, i dont think US badminton national pride effect would be in the same percentage scale proportional to SG's bronze in TT or ronald S win in japan open. Yes, any major win by an american in badminton would significant but it would takes a few more these win or consistent years of wins to imprint national pride into younger generation of american and canadian, and into the media mentality as well.

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    "I consider 'National Pride' as one of the main reasons why certain sports are supported to a level where champions are produced."

    Loh, thank you for your support

    "and again, as cooler have pointed out a few times already, i have to point back to my article, which is the very first post in this thread: there is a chicken-n-egg cycle that badminton in stuck in. we need to find a break to break ot of the cycle. the passion and interests of the mass public is one of the most difficult thing to sway."

    Kwun,

    If you and Cooler keeps on thinking that badminton is stuck in a chicken-an-egg cycle, then there's no way out to this topic. First of all, you yourself must believe that there is a way out, because Badminton IS popular in other countries like China and Denmark. Why? What have these countries done that US has not done? Why do the Chinese government, the Danish government, and now even the British government after Nathan Robertson and Gail Emms won medal in the Sydney Olympic, are pouring money into developing this sport? Why aren't the US government not doing anything? And the best example, the Brits have been so down in badminton until the MXD pair won an Olympic medal in 2000. They did not play for money. There is no money in Olympic. They played for National Pride. Money, fame, comes afterwards. The same in all sports and business.

    "u should know that they are many routes possible to attain a goal. The national pride one is the best but takes the longest. Throwing tons and tons of money at badminton is the quickest. Which one path is the best? everybody will have their opinion."

    Cooler

    National Pride may not be the quickest and certainly not the only method to attain Popularity in a sport, but surely it is an important element to kick something off. Throwing tons and tons of money into something is what you do afterwards, not the first step. Ask yourself one question. Imagine IF you were the government or a potential sponsor, imagine you were the Chairman of Yonex, would you start pouring in tons and tons of money into US badminton now?

    You see, badminton as a sport in US is so low in priority to the US government, to Yonex, and to the media. The badminton community in the US (including players, clubs, and the USBA) have to put in joint effort to open the eyes and eventually the wallet of the US government, Yonex... To tell them "hey come look at us, we need your support..." US badminton needs to initiate the first move to attract attention. Then the rest will come.

    And how...? Win a title or a medal. Not guaranteed it will definitely work, but definitely a good start.

    World champions in China, Malaysia, Denmark etc.. are trained from as young as 5 years old. Don't tell me that the coach said to Lin Dan.. "Hey son, badminton will earn you money and get you a ticket to the West...". I think the coach said "hey son, badminton is good for your health, and go earn a medal for China when you grow up..."

    And stop finding excuses. Badminton popularity has no geographical size limitation. You see large and small countries where badminton is popular and doing so well. And trust me, if US does have a title or medal winner in badminton, the US government will open their eyes even more to a sport that they have not had an achievement for so long.

    INTEREST & NATIONAL PRIDE are the fuel to start the engine. Money, TV coverage, sponsors, are only engine oils to make the car run smoother and faster.....
    Last edited by winstonchan; 05-05-2005 at 09:49 PM.

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