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View Poll Results: How do you place your feet for a backhand serve in doubles?

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  • Non-racquet foot forward

    344 19.78%
  • Racquet foot forward

    1,057 60.78%
  • Both feet (roughly) square to the net

    172 9.89%
  • It varies, depending on which side I serve from

    166 9.55%
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  1. #154
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trmun View Post
    You could use that logic about every single shot in the game - yet, you don't say to your rookies "do what feels the most comfortable". I've seen people who used pan handle, yet were still able to clear without any sort of trouble since they had awesome foot-work to compensate. I don't think you'll disagree that they would've been better off had they used a proper technique and not what felt the best.

    Standing with the non-racket foot forward has a couple of cons which are pretty big:

    1) less room for the rackets backswing which makes it more likely that you'll hit your own body with your rackethead.

    2) When setting off from the center, everyone sets off with their non-racket foot - by standing with this one forward, you'll be slower at getting to the net, than someone who has already placed his jump foot behind him.

    How comfortable you are is something you'll get by doing something loads of time - heck, in the beginning I think most of us were more comfortable using the panhandle, yet we were all trained how to do it properly so that holding it right is now what feels the most comfortable.

    To your improvement.
    I think for point no 1, some ppl lean forward quite a lot. That's why they don't find the racket head hitting their non-racket leg (which is in front).

    I personally use racket feet forward (near the T) because I don't lean so much to the front. When you lean too much to the front, there is a tendency to have higher racket position which is actually illegal.

    So I think there is another factor which is the body position in this argument about which leg is in front during a serve. When the non-racket is forward, they can also just step that foot to the left and they will be in the center position (when serving from the right side). When serving from the left side, just step the racket foot to the right and the effect is similar.

    I have seen ppl with square footing (looks strange to me) but it can work.

  2. #155
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    I probably should've pointed out that 2) was the most important

    Regarding stepping one foot to the side - that isn't what I was getting at in nr. 2, but rather when the reciever returns with a netdrop. You'll have to jump to the net if you want to keep the attack, and if you have your non-racket leg behind already, you'll be that much quicker there than if you have to first get your feet parallel, then jump to the front.

  3. #156
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trmun View Post
    I probably should've pointed out that 2) was the most important

    Regarding stepping one foot to the side - that isn't what I was getting at in nr. 2, but rather when the reciever returns with a netdrop. You'll have to jump to the net if you want to keep the attack, and if you have your non-racket leg behind already, you'll be that much quicker there than if you have to first get your feet parallel, then jump to the front.

    Theoretically it sounds right but I don't do it (non-racket foot in front) so I would refrain from commenting. I was just trying to explain why some ppl find that it is not a problem. I'll observe the ppl in my group if they are doing this. That is best.

  4. #157
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    Racket foot forward =/ Everyone I know in my HS badminton team does that and our coach tells us we should do it that way. xD

  5. #158
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trmun View Post
    Standing with the non-racket foot forward has a couple of cons which are pretty big:

    1) less room for the rackets backswing which makes it more likely that you'll hit your own body with your rackethead.
    If this is an issue, then your backswing is way too long.


    2) When setting off from the center, everyone sets off with their non-racket foot - by standing with this one forward, you'll be slower at getting to the net, than someone who has already placed his jump foot behind him.
    Immediately after serving, you should make a split drop, so you are ready to push off for the next shot. During this movement, you can reposition your feet however you please (I suggest approximately side-by-side, as you have much more net width to cover than forwards/backwards movement; but it may depend on your opponent's preferred returns).

    So by the time your opponent is hitting the shuttle, it shouldn't matter where your feet were originally positioned.

  6. #159
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gollum View Post
    If this is an issue, then your backswing is way too long.
    It depends on your serving technique. You can either use the wrist or a more pushing motion with a stiff wrist. The pushing motion is great as it is very easily reproduceable, downside is that it requires more space, which you won't have if you stand with the non-racket foot forwards.

    Immediately after serving, you should make a split drop, so you are ready to push off for the next shot. During this movement, you can reposition your feet however you please (I suggest approximately side-by-side, as you have much more net width to cover than forwards/backwards movement; but it may depend on your opponent's preferred returns).

    So by the time your opponent is hitting the shuttle, it shouldn't matter where your feet were originally positioned.
    If your opponent intercepts your serve high and drops it to the side you will be able to jump forwards immediatly, sure it is situational but as there isn't any downside to standing with the racketfoot forward I don't see the reason not to do it.

  7. #160
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trmun View Post
    It depends on your serving technique. You can either use the wrist or a more pushing motion with a stiff wrist. The pushing motion is great as it is very easily reproduceable, downside is that it requires more space, which you won't have if you stand with the non-racket foot forwards.
    Well, I can't recall seeing anyone playing at the top level who uses this big a backswing.

    I'm not sure whether I've got the right picture in my head of what you're describing. If it's what I think, then it's something I would try to coach out of students.

    My experience -- for what little that counts -- is that these long-push serves are pretty easy to attack.

    If your opponent intercepts your serve high and drops it to the side you will be able to jump forwards immediatly, sure it is situational but as there isn't any downside to standing with the racketfoot forward I don't see the reason not to do it.
    Er...

    If he drops it to the side, then you'll need to move mainly sideways (and also forwards).

    As you say, there's nothing wrong with serving racket-foot forwards. But then again, there's nothing wrong with the alternatives either.

    Some techniques are "objectively" right or wrong. Others are about personal preference. I believe this one is the latter.
    Last edited by Gollum; 02-28-2010 at 02:20 PM.

  8. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gollum View Post
    Well, I can't recall seeing anyone playing at the top level who uses this big a backswing.

    I'm not sure whether I've got the right picture in my head of what you're describing. If it's what I think, then it's something I would try to coach out of students.
    I must suck at explaining it then, because that was what I was taught by Peter Buch, an "old" top mix player from Denmark (and no he isn't the only one I've be coached to do this by, but he is just one of the more well known internationally).

    The idea is that by putting the majority of the movement to your elbow, you'll have an easier time reproducing your serve, thus making it easier to make a tight serve.

    Anyhow I believe that this is something we won't agree on, so you keep on coaching your students to stand with whatever foot in front, and I'll keep on coaching mine to stand with their racket foot in front.

  9. #162
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trmun View Post
    I must suck at explaining it then, because that was what I was taught by Peter Buch, an "old" top mix player from Denmark (and no he isn't the only one I've be coached to do this by, but he is just one of the more well known internationally).
    That's going back a long way (mid 1980s, I believe). Such a style of service may have been prevalent back when rackets were much heavier, and you needed a longer action to keep the swing smooth.

    But that's just one possible explanation. Without more information, it's completely unfair of me to dismiss his teaching as a product of his time.

    Anyway, some current world-class players, such as Donna Kellogg, serve with their non-racket foot forwards. I don't see Donna having any trouble with her serve.

    If you want to use your long-push style of serve, then yes, I think non-racket foot forwards could be a serious problem. These two technical elements are potentially incompatible (depending on just how long that swing is). For an old-school under-the-armpit serve, the only workable option is racket foot forwards.
    Last edited by Gollum; 03-01-2010 at 03:25 AM.

  10. #163
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    I think that having your knees slightly bent , ready to take off for your next shot is as important as where you place your feet. 'Yeah yeah', you might say, 'but it only takes a micro second to bend your knees'. You'd be right, but the game is about micro seconds.

  11. #164
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grotius View Post
    I think that having your knees slightly bent , ready to take off for your next shot is as important as where you place your feet. 'Yeah yeah', you might say, 'but it only takes a micro second to bend your knees'. You'd be right, but the game is about micro seconds.
    I suggest that you don't bend your knees or use a wide base when serving, as this will cause you to serve from lower down.

    A much better option is to stand upright when you serve, and then immediately transition into a split drop. The dynamic "bounce effect" you get from this movement will be much more effective than maintaining a static knees-bent position.

  12. #165
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    The best stance for doubles backhand serve is to have your right foot in front if you are a right hander. The reason is to make it easier to lead with your right shoulder, vital for the flick serve that can be executed with more deception and leverage. With your non-racquet foot in front, this will somewhat impede the stroke.
    The knees should not be bent when serving but somewhere in the stroke cycle you need leverage on your foot to make it easier for you to move. This means that either at the start of the serve or during the serve, you must raise your left foot toes. This is vital because if both your feet are flat and rooted to the floor, there is no spring for you to move fast.

  13. #166
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    I think that racket foot forward is the easiest and most effective way of serving in doubles.

  14. #167
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    actually i serve with the non racket foot in front before,

    then changing to the racket foot in front

    after that, i found some differences in the front court interception for both

    anyway, i use both styles nowadays

    next, try both feet square

    boy! its never too late to learn one of the first skill for badminton or

    in fact, the first skill for doubles lol

  15. #168
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    For me when I serve, it varies according to which side I serve. But after reading through this thread, it seems to me that racket foot forward is the correct method. Should try to practise this in my badminton game next time...
    Last edited by drifit; 01-05-2011 at 02:39 AM.

  16. #169
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    I just learned to backhand serve since I felt like it was something that I never had in my arsenal. It's really nice to have a lot more control, but my short forehand is still a lot more dangerous, since I've had so much practice with it. Can't wait to see how the backhand will turn out after some practice.

    I serve with my racquet foot forward as well. I rest my feet in ready position for the non-racquet side, then lean forward while raising my left heel a bit.

    I point the bird inwards towards the racquet while the bird is touching the racquet head. Then I pull my racquet back and swing forward, letting go at the last second.

    At the moment I'm trying to force my legs to take a step back and then do the split drop. This is singles, so I'm not sure if I'm doing it right.

  17. #170
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    You can find world champions serving racket foot , non racket foot and level, so I think any of those is good enough for the people on here.

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