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View Poll Results: How do you place your feet for a backhand serve in doubles?

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  • Non-racquet foot forward

    344 19.78%
  • Racquet foot forward

    1,057 60.78%
  • Both feet (roughly) square to the net

    172 9.89%
  • It varies, depending on which side I serve from

    166 9.55%
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  1. #52
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    sorry if this has been posted already, i havent read through everyones replies. but when i serve backhand, regardless of left/right box, i serve with my racket foot forward as it allows me space to bring my racket back in case i want to flick a serve to the back otherwise i just hit my hip and fumble the serve into the net. reason being i can't get enough power otherwise

  2. #53
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    I play at an intermediate level and most people I play, like me have the raquet foot forward, because as many people say it allows then to swing.

    However, when you watch international doubles, they tend to stand square. I think this is because the likely return of serve will be a drop or a push and so the server is more likely to be moving left and right, not backwards.

    Also, because doubles is dominated by the low serve and attack, one foot doesnt really need to be leading, because the only purpose this has is to prepare for a smash or clear (which wont happen at the net). A server will be waiting to push or tap the return to keep the attack, and push and taps tend to be used with a square stance.
    Last edited by Radium; 03-24-2006 at 11:17 AM.

  3. #54
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    i think if your non-racket feet is foward, there is a slight little chance that your racket might just hit your leg, but thatz very rare. I could do both feet and racket feet up, and i do good serves with both

  4. #55
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    i put racket foot forward but i voted wrong woops

  5. #56
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    racket foot forward for me.it just seems the most natural

  6. #57
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    i stand with my racket foot forwards so that i am ready to attack the return of serve.

  7. #58
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    i used to play with my non-racquet leg for such serves but am recently changing to the racquet leg, primarily because i'm trying of getting into the habit of keeping my right leg forward in start-position most of the time. i realised that with my change i need to take only two steps to the net, as opposed to three with my non-racquet leg, to counter a drop shot. movement also feels smoother.

  8. #59
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    this is tricky one to answer for me for if i'm playing mens level doubles then i stand completly square to the net BUT if i'm mixed doubles then i will place my racket foot forward. however when i play singles i will place my non racket foot forward. so for me it really does depend on what game i am playing

  9. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by RaymondLin
    Ya it is incorrect because coach usually right and I find the reason he give me for racket foot foward makes sense.
    Before I did non racket foot foward and after i switched it around I find it a lot easier to serve.(More space) doesn't hit non racket foot.
    the non - racket foot foward thing is not incorrect. you get to choose whether or not to have your right foot or left foot out.
    i find having my racket foot out easier, but some people prefer their non racket foot because it helps them move back a bit better.

  10. #61
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    This topic has generated a lot of discussion!

    In my view, it does not matter which foot you place forwards (for backhand serve in doubles).

    I have tried all the variations; right now I serve with both feet placed together, because I find it more comfortable to stand like that.

    Lee Jae Bok also says that it doesn't matter how you arrange your feet for the doubles service.

    Whichever method you choose, you should get ready for the next shot by doing a split drop: widen your base (legs) and load your leg muscles ready to move immediately.

    Given that your role after the low serve is to intercept at the net, it makes sense to end with a side by side feet position. That is the most effective position for moving sideways along the net. You can move into this position using your split drop "get ready" motion, regardless of where your feet were originally planted.

  11. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by raptorman
    So you're saying the serve of the number 2 in men doubles (Martin Lundgaard) is incorrect lol.
    And why would you need more place if the shuttle is very close to your racquet when serving?
    Lol, a bit obvious y u need it close to your racket, less room for error and you know where you have to move your racket.

    I have 2 very different types of service in doubles, both backhands and both very effective:

    One is standing right foot forward with weight on the back foot and slicing the shuttle (hehe, owns club players coz it swerves in the air - its called an s-serve) but this is almost impossible to drive serve from, however, you can serve anywhere in the court with alot of disguse with this.

    My usual one is both feet up to the line getting my racket as high as is legally possible and as close to the net as possible, this is good for straight short serves, drives and flicks. Impossible to serve a deceptive wide service though.

  12. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gollum
    This topic has generated a lot of discussion!

    In my view, it does not matter which foot you place forwards (for backhand serve in doubles).

    I have tried all the variations; right now I serve with both feet placed together, because I find it more comfortable to stand like that.

    Lee Jae Bok also says that it doesn't matter how you arrange your feet for the doubles service.

    Whichever method you choose, you should get ready for the next shot by doing a split drop: widen your base (legs) and load your leg muscles ready to move immediately.

    Given that your role after the low serve is to intercept at the net, it makes sense to end with a side by side feet position. That is the most effective position for moving sideways along the net. You can move into this position using your split drop "get ready" motion, regardless of where your feet were originally planted.
    Indeed, i have been coached by Lee Jae Bok himself, but he said you should always stand with you right foot slightly infront of your left, seeing as you leed with your right foot. We are ofcourse forgetting about the lefties here.

  13. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sunsgambit
    My usual one is both feet up to the line getting my racket as high as is legally possible and as close to the net as possible, this is good for straight short serves, drives and flicks. Impossible to serve a deceptive wide service though.
    i have to disagree in that i have developed a technique that allows me to serve as far outwide as i possiblly can but still no showing exactly where i'm going to place the shuttle

  14. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sunsgambit
    One is standing right foot forward with weight on the back foot and slicing the shuttle (hehe, owns club players coz it swerves in the air - its called an s-serve)
    The S-serve is not legal. The IBF introduced a service law specifically intended to ban it: the law says you must hit the cork first; the S-serve involves striking the feathers first or the feathers and cork together.

    My usual one is both feet up to the line getting my racket as high as is legally possible and as close to the net as possible, this is good for straight short serves, drives and flicks. Impossible to serve a deceptive wide service though.
    No it's not. To learn the technique, see Lee's www.ibbs.tv video on the low serve in doubles; the sliced low serve to the left is extremely deceptive. When I do this well, I get often get aces against good players.
    Last edited by Gollum; 06-06-2006 at 02:38 PM.

  15. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gollum
    The S-serve is not legal. The IBF introduced a service law specifically intended to ban it: the law says you must hit the cork first; the S-serve involves striking the feathers first or the feathers and cork together.
    Dam it, well there goes my favourite tournament serve..

    Quote Originally Posted by Gollum
    No it's not. To learn the technique, see Lee's www.ibbs.tv video on the low serve in doubles; the sliced low serve to the left is extremely deceptive. When I do this well, I get often get aces against good players.
    No no, when i serve like that, i point the shuttle at where i'm serving, so my opponet sees that easily. That's another advantage of my other serve, it's very deceptive seeing as i always slice from left to right no matter what type of serve it is. THanks for the site though, but which vid is it?

    EDIT:

    Scratch that, actually, if i cut it and use a lifting action it goes cross-court and short. I have discovered this thatnks to you and i am grateful
    Last edited by Sunsgambit; 06-06-2006 at 03:23 PM.

  16. #67
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    No no, when i serve like that, i point the shuttle at where i'm serving, so my opponet sees that easily. That's another advantage of my other serve, it's very deceptive seeing as i always slice from left to right no matter what type of serve it is. THanks for the site though, but which vid is it?

    EDIT:

    Scratch that, actually, if i cut it and use a lifting action it goes cross-court and short. I have discovered this thatnks to you and i am grateful
    In Lee's video, he turns the shuttle outwards at the very last moment. This reduces the amount of slice needed for the angle. It's almost impossible to read.

    The video: http://www.ibbs.tv/IBBS/secure/video...D=3&IsActive=2

    It costs 2.

    This video also contains one of the very few instances where I disagree with Lee's teaching -- the part about drive serves.

  17. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gollum
    In Lee's video, he turns the shuttle outwards at the very last moment. This reduces the amount of slice needed for the angle. It's almost impossible to read.

    The video: http://www.ibbs.tv/IBBS/secure/video...D=3&IsActive=2

    It costs 2.

    This video also contains one of the very few instances where I disagree with Lee's teaching -- the part about drive serves.
    Hmm, thanks, i'll have to try that out and prehapse ask my dad, who has recently become the head coach of Oxfordshire Badminton Association, nothing on Lee, but still, used to be No. in the county and did coach former England No. 1 Julie Bradbury.

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