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    Default Relation of backhand clear length to stiffness of racket shaft

    Hi BC-ers, I was wondering whether there's any relation between backhand clear length and racket type (especially the stiffness of the shaft). I have been using a racket with high flex (6.8mm shaft), 26/27lbs tension, and weighs around 85g. Overall, this racket is good for accurate strokes but is not ideal for power play.

    This is the racket:
    http://www.yangyang-rg.com/index.php...il#.VJOuFmcCYw

    I find it difficult to produce a full length clear when being caught by a punch/attacking clear to my backhand after rushing from MC to RC. Usually I will resort to doing a wristy half smash/drive as clearing the shuttle after my body will definitely not travel full length. Would a stiffer shaft have made it easier?

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    Probably not.

    Playing a full backhand clear behind the body when being caught is about the hardest thing to do.
    A stiffer racket will need even more power! Because it is harder to bend.

    I would recommend to work on your footwork instead of buying a new racket. The faster you are, the less you get into bad positions (like having to play backhand)...

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    This is a hybrid topic with multiple elements in question, so I appreciate your effort in trying to answer me.

    I'll stick with high flex rackets then. Well, I can't deny it's a footwork problem when you're caught with the shuttle in front of your body (that scenario is self-evident). But I've seen many professional players being caught that way, some even being forced to nose dive but they still manage a good length backhand with a very small 'flick' action. It could be wrist power as well? I bet they'd be using much stiffer rackets than mine.

    People have said that my backhand looks natural and relaxed but I feel I'm missing a key element of power generation. Somehow I can't 'thunder' a backhand like I've seen many players do. I feel that my motion is smooth with a crisp contact but there is no 'umph'. When I do a backhand, I feel it as more of a side to side motion. When I do the 'twisting the doorknob' action, I feel more of the racket head traveling from one side of my head to the other side where it makes contact. It may dip below for a while as I draw it up like a sword to strike at the shuttle, but that's not where I feel the momentum gather. Should it be more of a drawing up action then a side to side one?

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    Okay, couldn't edit my post after 15 mins but I found something about flex:

    http://www.badmintoncentral.com/foru...lity-explained

    Slower swing goes better with high flex so that the shaft has time to unbend.

    Faster swing goes better with stiff shaft as it unbends quickly.

    I'll experiment with this idea!

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    whatever stiffness, it has to be the right one for your stroke style and hand speed in order to generate length or power

    but generally, flexier (and head heavier) is easier

    technique wise, make sure you're leading the stroke with your elbow as part of your arm uncoiling into striking the shuttle... as well as shifting your weight into the strike

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    You can't compare a leisure/hobby players backhand to the one of the pros. Most pros have ridiculous wrist-power. I've played against players playing crosscourt-underarm clears virtually out of nowhere.
    That's a different world...

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    Quote Originally Posted by FeatherDance View Post
    Okay, couldn't edit my post after 15 mins but I found something about flex:

    http://www.badmintoncentral.com/foru...lity-explained

    Slower swing goes better with high flex so that the shaft has time to unbend.

    Faster swing goes better with stiff shaft as it unbends quickly.

    I'll experiment with this idea!
    How many hours a week do you spend on court hitting a shuttle compared to a pro?

    A bigger factor will be your technique (that includes footwork and stroke production and the striking point).

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    Hey Cheung, below is my schedule. Yeah I know, just keep rethinking what I'm doing and trying to be better.

    Sunday: 2 hour matches
    Tuesday: 3 hours training
    Thursday : 2 hours matches
    Saturday : 4 hours training

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    That's what pros do in 2 days. For years.

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    The others have it right - this is nothing to do with your racket, its just your technique. Post a video if you want help developing power in your backhand. You could give me a stiff shafted racket, or a flexible one, it won't matter, I can still play a full court backhand clear (assuming the shuttle is not slow) - however, one racket feels better than the other thats where the racket makes a difference - I like the way it feels when I play with it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    whatever stiffness, it has to be the right one for your stroke style and hand speed in order to generate length or power

    but generally, flexier (and head heavier) is easier

    technique wise, make sure you're leading the stroke with your elbow as part of your arm uncoiling into striking the shuttle... as well as shifting your weight into the strike
    Yep. It's really down to how well the racquet suits you individually.

    I personally find a non-head heavy racquet far easier to play any BH shots and get most power from.

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    And to those who note that we mere mortals don't have good backhand like the pros... they are absolutely right! That's why the choice of a racket with a not too stiff shaft and slightly head heavy is very helpful in generating power.

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    Keep doing your training, particularly on backhand, and i believe one day you might post your video doing various shots of backhand. You're lucky enough to undergo daily training, which mean somebody has to help you feeding the shuttlecock. If your skill is naturally good enough and yet you feel thr lack of "boom" power of backhands, then simply do backhand dumbell lifting. Start at 1kg for the first 2-weeks, daily at 20x5. Then incrementally increase by 0.5kg (or increase the number of set) for every other week. By the time you reach 5kg dumbell lifting for 20x5 without hurting anywhere your wrist or arm, then guarantee you'll be satisfied with your powerful backhand (on condition you're still doing it naturally skillful).

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    I was never trying to blame my bh on my racket as I allowed for all other contentions. My main concern is the relationship of bh power generation to shaft stiffness which is pretty much answered. I least care if a pro does what I do for a week in 2 days, it poses no relevance to a hobbyist. I have seen other hobbyists being able to thunder backhands all the same. But suit yourselves.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FeatherDance View Post
    I was never trying to blame my bh on my racket as I allowed for all other contentions. My main concern is the relationship of bh power generation to shaft stiffness which is pretty much answered. I least care if a pro does what I do for a week in 2 days, it poses no relevance to a hobbyist. I have seen other hobbyists being able to thunder backhands all the same. But suit yourselves.
    You are quite right - many players I know have excellent backhands. What I would generally say - the most powerful backhands are from people with the best technique (obviously!) and the best technique is normally the smallest and most compact technique, and that most suits a stiff racket.

    So, whilst racket stiffness will not affect your backhand, you will probably end up at a stiff racket in the end if you keep practicing lots!

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    If you are caught late turning to BH....the grip, the pre-swing prep, and the swinging technic all goes together. Yet, the weaker, slower pace BH clears (from the pros), are swallowed up whole by another pro.

    Even pro wants to drive, and keep it low, in the same scenario. Not sure this helps at all.

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    Default Right technique comes first. Equipment comes second.

    One should work hard to develop right technique for each stroke.

    With right technique you can make right and effective strokes with any dam racket.

    Racket (equipment) may makes little/marginal difference. A particular racket may offer slight advantage for a particular stroke, but in a game one has to play variety of strokes.

    Another point is you have to tune your strokes with racket. Once you are used to using a particular type of racket, you can play all strokes well with that. No matter whether it is heavy, light, flexible or stiff. Player with right technique will play all kinds of strokes well with any racket with some practice.

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