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Thread: No Wrist

  1. #1
    Sean Davies
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    Default No Wrist

    I was playing a guy a few weeks back who could hit the shuttle very hard from all areas of the court, but was only using a very short swing. It was incredibly effective especially in the mid court area. I commentated on this and he said the secret is when you play a shot not to use any wrist movement at all - a technique generally used by the chinese as opposed to the more traditional wristy style of the europeans. Does anybody else use this style and can they recommend any sites/books to find out more?

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    Default Re: No Wrist

    Now, that is a new concept.

    As far as I know, effective smashing strength without using the wrist is very difficult and very tiring.

    Traditionally, Europeans are supposedly less "wristy" than their Asain counterparts. In top class badminton, these generalisations are not so apparent.

    I would be very interested to see this person's technique.
    Hard smashes are a relative concept. I have a friend who hits the shuttle hard. I didn't see him for a few years and then when we played again, his smashes didn't seem way as hard as before. (He was still using the same model racquet and strings and had been playing reguarly).

  3. #3
    Sean
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    Default Re: No Wrist

    I think his power must of been coming primarily from the forearm and elbow.

    I don't know if you can expand on the following I found at :-
    http://www.badzone.co.uk/coaches%20corner/badminton%20tutorial.html

    Forearm Technique:
    OK, by now you've probably developed your own style of hitting the shuttle, probably whatever you've found works for you. Now it's time to change your style. Most likely, if you came from the old school of training, you were told to use your wrist. Unfortunately that is not the right way to do it .
    Hold the racket in the forehand position, with the correct hand grip.

    Pull the racket back in the direction of the arrow, turning your forearm as you do so. You should now be able to see the underside of your forearm. You should also be able to feel the side muscles in your forearm tightening. Quickly swing the racket in the opposite direction. This is the primary action you should use.

    When using the forearm-technique for overhead shots, you should lead with your elbow (ie. as you turn your body to hit the shot, your racket-elbow comes up, followed by your forearm turn). Your arm will swing forward and your body will follow-through for maximum power transfer.

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    Default Re: No Wrist

    Sean, what you're describing is indeed the basis of all stroke production in badminton: the pronation and the supination of the forearm. The wrist has nothing to do with producing power. The wrist is used for directing shots. So, in other words the term "wrist player" in inaccurate and should really be "forearm player". However, we're sloppy and it is die-hard terminology which sometimes causes confusion.

    Typical "wrist" (as in forearm) players have very little arm swing (as you described) and the strokes are very difficult to anticipate. In many ways, it is the "proper" way to play, and it is what you should aim for.

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    Default Re: No Wrist

    I'm getting really confused now.

    Can you provide a clearer explanation based on the following terminology?

    The wrist is a joint.
    The forearm contains muscles which move the wrist. Flexion/extension.

    As I understand at the moment:
    The pronation of the forearm adds power (as well as direction).
    Movement by the wrist joint can add power.
    Subtle use of the fingers can add power..


    When you say "very little arm swing" which part of the arm?
    Shoulder/upper arm/elbow/forearm/wrist/fingers?

    Thanks

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    Default Re: No Wrist

    Cheung, from what I've gathered you're a competent player, so I guess this is just a confusion of terms. Your description is correct, apart from the fact that movement of the wrist does NOT produce any significant power. The only movement the wrist itself is capable of is a cocking action and that is basically used only to direct the shot downwards.

    I just want to point out that anyone who can clear a shuttle from base to base is doing this pronation business... whether you're aware of it or not! (Thinking too consciously about pronation/supination can actually be a bit hampering... just do it!)

    The term "wrist shot" is a relic from pre-80's coaching, when the extra power was thought to come from cocking the wrist. In the late 70's, Canadian (yep) scientists conducted high-speed camera tests and discovered that it was the pronative/supinative movement in the forearm that added power, not the usage of the wrist itself.

    When I say "very little arm swing" I mean very little shoulder/upper arm movement. Sorry if I was unclear. The term "arm players" usually refers to somebody who swings the racquet almost like a tennis racquet, with a big arm swing... very unresourceful in badminton!

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    Default Re: No Wrist

    Thanks for the clarification, Mag.
    Maybe a glossary of terms and definations would be of help. I wonder in IBF or other badminton organisations have one.

  8. #8
    Sean
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    Default Re: No Wrist

    Mag,

    When I was shown how to play forehand overhead shots it was basically to start off by moving your racquet back behind your head so it touches/scratches your lower back. This obviously will create a big arm swing (like tennis). Are you saying this is incorrect?. Where should your racquet go.

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    Default Re: No Wrist

    You do not move your racket so back behind, I doubt this is the correct way to do a clear.

    The correct way from what I have seen the local coaches in my area teach is to actually turn and twist your torso, holding the racket at a slight angle. Hitting the shuttle at the highest point together with your torso twist plus your arm swing.

    I'm not sure if I have described it correctly. Maybe Mag can explain it better

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    Default Re: No Wrist

    Something like that. That allows you to more effectively use your natural momentum rather than you arm, wrist and shoulder strength only.

    Which I explained to Blitz before, doing baseline to baseline 'lobs or 'clears' does not require a lot of strength. Its all in the correct timing of hit and the 'correct' application of strength. If applied with pracice, its usable both for smashes, drops and clears. Very deceptive actually. I've yet to master it myself though I have seen pros do it such that the strokes look absolutley identical till the last split second !

    If you had ever seen the videos of Zhao Jianhua and Ye Zhaoying do it, you 'll understand what I mean.

  11. #11
    David
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    Default Re: No Wrist

    This no wrist business totally makes sense. I can't help but relate the badminton smash with the crack of a whip. The speeds at the end of a whip can reach super sonic speeds, thus the "crack". This technique just helps you use your arm/raquet similarly as a whip. Where you crack(smash) the birdy into your opponents chest.
    Mag, you're the pro here, can you give us some 1, 2, 3 steps to help us gain/improve our smashes? I know it's not that simple, but the little bits of information here and there help a lot, I'd just like you to organize and add tips to these. Thanks.

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    Default Re: No Wrist

    First I want to make clear that I'm definitely no pro, David. But thanks for the compliment!

    If you have problems with your smash, it is often fruitful to analyse your clears. The clear is the base stroke for the smash -- the footwork's basically the same, the swing is the same, the main difference is that you hit the shuttle in front of you on the smash and above you or even slightly behind you on the clear. And you can't execute a good smash if your clear isn't solid. It's also easier to assess when you're executing the clear correcly (it should land in the back "corridor").

    If you do have a good and consistent clear, then there is nothing I or anybody else can tell you that will improve your smash -- at least not without being able to see how you do it. The only way is to practise it.

    One thing about smash practising is to quit when you get tired. When you get tired your technique and concentration will deteriorate and you will get sloppy... and there's no point in sloppy movements!

  13. #13
    Sean
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    Default Re: No Wrist

    So when playing an overhead can you please just run through the correct technique, because it certainly seems like I'm doing it wrong.

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    Default Re: No Wrist

    Sorry for posting this so late, after you've probably gone on to other topics, but I think I understand what shot you're talking about. The only one I know of that looks like no wrist is being used is the chop, which has a very short backswing and travels fast and flat with little effort. You usually execute this shot when the bird is a little below your waist. Start with the racquet about 2 ft behind the bird and at shoulder height (or less, but still above the bird), and hit down and toward the bird as if you were chopping with a hatchet. (The path of the racquet head is abt 30 degrees from the vertical) Your wrist does move, but vertically, not so much toward the bird. this is what makes it look like a no-wrist shot.

    After you get used to it you can hit chops on higher birds, but I'm no good chopping very far above head height.

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