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  1. #1
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    Default Tan Joe Hok replace Icuk ???

    There is a gossip right now in Indonesia that PBSI will point Tan Joe Hok to replace Icuk as a directur of training in a few days.

    TJH (who now is a directur of development in PBSI) is a first Indonesia player to win MS in All England in 1959.
    It will very interesting if TJH is pointed. Because he will be the fourth old player to take the job after Rudy, Christian and Icuk.

    Hendra Kartenegara (his official name) received a Distinguished Associates Award from IBF ini 1987.

  2. #2
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    Default Perhaps a good move

    Tan is certainly a very bright man, and he cares, although he has had a terrible few years dealing with discrimination as an ethnic Chinese (he hates using that made up Indonesian name Hendra Kartanegara, which he was forced to do during the period of "assimilation)). Here is a recent profile of him from The Jakarta Post, where he talked about his ideas for the future of Indonesian badminton.


    It's mind over matter for badminton legend


    Sports News - February 13, 2005

    Bruce Emond, The Jakarta Post, Jakarta

    Meeting Tan Joe Hok for the first time may lead some to suspect that a horribly decaying portrait lies tucked away in a dark corner of his home in Kuningan, South Jakarta.



    While other sporting legends descend into stooped, sagging shadows of their once active selves, the country's first winner of the All England badminton men's singles title -- way back in 1959 -- looks suspiciously well preserved.

    At 68, his vigorous bearing is not due to some Wildean pact with the devil, but his concerted approach to warding off the ravages of the aging process, what he terms "integrated life management".

    Although he does not play badminton anymore, he takes early morning walks, works out in the small gym in his home and has been basically vegetarian for the past 10 years.

    And there is also his enduring philosophy -- dating back to his playing days -- of the power of mind over matter.

    As with everything in his life, from working hard to become the best in the world by the age of 22, only to hang up his racket for university study, the decision to stay fit was one made with careful, calculated consideration.

    Like the scientist he is (he majored in chemistry and biology at Baylor University in Texas), he sizes up the problems of life, studiously considering all the attendant variables before embarking on a plan of action.

    Never one to make rash decisions or to take risks, he returns time and again to his life motto of "the future belongs to those who are prepared".

    Of course, his scientific training has contributed to his viewpoint, but it seems that other factors, gleaned from personal experience, have also been at play.

    Not least among them was growing up at the tail end of the Depression, followed by the difficult Japanese occupation during World War II. Also among them is the persistent insecurity of being of ethnic Chinese descent, even if one was a world beater proudly bearing the name of Indonesia.

    Born in Bandung, Tan moved around West Java with his family during the tough times of the late 1930s and early '40s, eventually returning to settle in the province's capital.

    His father was from a wealthy family, but, Tan said, "he didn't like to work, he was what we call badung (reckless)".

    As a child, he would watch his mother play badminton in their yard. "I was a born athlete. I could turn my hand to anything."

    From the young standout in his neighborhood, he became champion of Bandung by the age of 15; at 17, he won a famous victory over top player Nyoo Kiem Bie in Surabaya.

    Two years later, Tan took the Indonesian Open singles and men's doubles titles in his hometown.

    He nursed ambitions to leave Indonesia and conquer foreign shores.

    "I would read in the newspaper about Finn Kobbero and Eddy Choong, and I wanted to become number one like them," he said of the Danish and Malaysian players.

    "I worked hard and prepared myself mentally. I would wake up at 5 a.m., without needing an alarm clock, and bike to a running track, but still be at school before the gates closed at 7 a.m."

    In 1956, his dream came true with a trip to Singapore. He won the tournament, but the experience also provided the sobering realization that he could not earn a living from the sport.

    He stayed during the tournament with Ismail bin Marjan, a doubles player who had been a runner up at the 1951 All England when Singapore was still part of Malaysia.

    "Singapore wasn't like it is today. He still lived in a kampong where you had to walk outside along a plank to go to the toilet ... I cried in my heart seeing it."

    Marjan supported his family by working as a night watchman.

    "I decided then and there that I would become number one in the world, beat everybody, and then say goodbye."

    He did just that in a charmed season in 1959. He rallied to defeat the legendary Kobbero in their first meeting, and took the All England by beating compatriot Ferry Sonneville, one of his teammates in the victorious, history-making Thomas Cup campaign a year earlier.

    He also won the Canada Open and All America Open; Sports Illustrated, not known for its coverage of a sport considered more of a backyard pastime in the U.S., devoted a two-page story to Tan in April 1959, quaintly described as one of "... the young brown men who know very little of highballs and hamburgers".

    True to his word, he quit when he was on top, heading to Baylor with his wife to study (he returned to win two golds in the 1962 Asian Games and was on the team that took the Thomas Cup again in 1964).

    His wife, herself a former player, did not like the U.S., so the family took on coaching stints in Mexico and Hong Kong. They returned home in the early 1970s, with Tan working in several ventures.

    It was then, under the fledgling New Order government, that discrimination became infuriatingly apparent to him. It ranged from the bureaucratic runaround about his citizenship papers, to having his two children rejected from entering the neighborhood school. It also included being told, as the coach of the successful 1984 Thomas Cup team, to replace an ethnic Chinese player with a Javanese because, some griped, the team did not look Indonesian enough.

    He still smarts at the injustice.

    "I am a nationalist, a product of Sukarno. He gave us a sense of pride and a sense of nationalism, regardless of who you were ... Why should I be treated like a stepchild by my own country? It's crazy."

    By 1997, he had had enough, and applied to emigrate to Australia. However, his wife died suddenly in February 1998, and then came the May riots, in which Chinese-Indonesians were targeted.

    The memory of the latter is still so painful that he breaks down as he talks about it. But age has also given him license to speak his mind.

    He is grateful the Chinese New Year has been made an official holiday, but he still considers it "peanuts ... If there is real political will, it's easy for the government to state the rights and responsibilities of all its citizens ... Is there any guarantee it (anti-Chinese violence) won't happen again?"

    It has taken him him several years to get over the trauma of 1998, but now he is back helping the sport once again. He is the head of research and development for the Badminton Association of Indonesia (PBSI), with plans to improve the training facilities and living conditions of the players.

    Sports psychology, not surprisingly, is also a big part of his plans. "Everything is given to the players, but we must work on their mentality, to make them hungry ... If a coach says that a target is to reach the semifinals, then there should be a big question mark."

    If the players and coaches are not receptive to his input, he will move on to other things, or spend a quiet retirement -- "I'm a loner, as a Leo, it's in my character" -- with his two dogs and his large library of books, many devoted to psychology and sports nutrition.

    He is not slavishly devoted to memories of his heyday -- his trophies are kept in a cabinet on the second floor -- but he still takes satisfaction in what he accomplished. "What is past is past. It's only sometimes that I cherish the things I did all those years ago. Nobody knew Indonesia before there was me and my friends. I am happy to say I was a pioneer."

  3. #3
    Regular Member ctjcad's Avatar
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    Default A new movie based on the life of Tan Joe Hok..

    ..just came across this news recently.

    Apparently, a film producer in Indonesia, Salman Aristo, is going to make a movie based on the life of Tan Joe Hok, arguably, one of Indonesia's great shuttlers.
    To most of us, he is know as the fore-father of Indonesian badminton.
    Amongst his well know accomplishments, he is the first Indonesian shuttler to win the coveted All-England back in 1959. Then, he helped Indonesia claimed and retained the Thomas Cup in 1958, 1961 & 1964.

    According to the article, the intention of making this movie is to
    - pay homage to one of the great Indonesian shuttlers of all time
    - to promote Indonesia, as a country, and its accomplishments
    - to strengthen the resolve of the people who will watch the movie. To plant the seed of belief that they should not give up and always have hope. And to show that "Indonesia Bisa!"
    - lastly, as entertainment..

    They are planning to start shooting the movie at the beginning of next yr (2009), as they are still in the process of pre-production, pre-scripting and doing casting calls. Yes, Mr. Tan is still alive and the producer even asked him if he wants to contribute a bit in the movie.

    A May (20th) 2009 release, at the earliest, is what their aiming for to commemorate Indonesia's Hari Kebangkitan Nasional (Indonesia's National Awakening Day). If they can't do it by May, then they will shoot for August 17th, which happens to be Indonesia's Independence Day. If worst comes to worst and they still won't be able to release it in August, then they'll shoot for September, to be held in conjunction with the National Sports Day.

    Source:
    http://www.inilah.com/berita/2008/06...-melawan-lupa/

    ..any BCer interested in applying to play as Tan Joe Hok??..

    pic of Tan Joe Hok, below. (For those who remember Mr. Tan, e.g. taneepak, Loh and maybe Oldhand)...
    Last edited by ctjcad; 07-02-2008 at 04:23 AM.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by ctjcad View Post
    ..just came across this news recently.

    Apparently, a film producer in Indonesia, Salman Aristo, is going to make a movie based on the life of Tan Joe Hok, arguably, one of Indonesia's great shuttlers.
    To most of us, he is know as the fore-father of Indonesian badminton.
    Amongst his well know accomplishments, he is the first Indonesian shuttler to win the coveted All-England back in 1959. Then, he helped Indonesia claimed and retained the Thomas Cup in 1958, 1961 & 1964.

    According to the article, the intention of making this movie is to
    - pay homage to one of the great Indonesian shuttlers of all time
    - to promote Indonesia, as a country, and its accomplishments
    - to strengthen the resolve of the people who will watch the movie. To plant the seed of belief that they should not give up and always have hope. And to show that "Indonesia Bisa!"
    - lastly, as entertainment..

    They are planning to start shooting the movie at the beginning of next yr (2009), as they are still in the process of pre-production, pre-scripting and doing casting calls. Yes, Mr. Tan is still alive and the producer even asked him if he wants to contribute a bit in the movie.

    A May (20th) 2009 release, at the earliest, is what their aiming for to commemorate Indonesia's Hari Kebangkitan Nasional (Indonesia's National Awakening Day). If they can't do it by May, then they will shoot for August 17th, which happens to be Indonesia's Independence Day. If worst comes to worst and they still won't be able to release it in August, then they'll shoot for September, to be held in conjunction with the National Sports Day.

    Source:
    http://www.inilah.com/berita/2008/06...-melawan-lupa/

    ..any BCer interested in applying to play as Tan Joe Hok??..

    pic of Tan Joe Hok, below. (For those who remember Mr. Tan, e.g. taneepak, Loh and maybe Oldhand)...
    i hope its gonna be a great movie..

  5. #5
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default A chance meeting with Tan Joe Hok

    It was during the Thomas Cup/Uber Cup competitions in Jakarta last May.

    Our BC group was hosted to dinner by Krisna and his friends at Lagunas Restaurant one evening. I think it was towards the end of the dinner that the legendary Tan, who was smartly dressed in a light jacket I think, appeared to have a word with Krisna. He looked rather studious and business-like with his spectacles in place. That was why I couldn't recognize him at first until I heard someone whispering his name!

    We really missed the chance to talk to him. But it was already very late.
    I wish him well.

  6. #6
    Regular Member ctjcad's Avatar
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    Default ^^I hope..^^

    ...those sneaky movie-goers won't bring their tiny digicam and record the movie in the theatre...and then record it on a DVD & sell bootleg copies of it in the middle of one of the malls..
    Last edited by ctjcad; 07-02-2008 at 05:13 AM.

  7. #7
    Regular Member ctjcad's Avatar
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    Default Hmm..

    Quote Originally Posted by Loh View Post
    It was during the Thomas Cup/Uber Cup competitions in Jakarta last May.

    Our BC group was hosted to dinner by Krisna and his friends at Lagunas Restaurant one evening. I think it was towards the end of the dinner that the legendary Tan, who was smartly dressed in a light jacket I think, appeared to have a word with Krisna. He looked rather studious and business-like with his spectacles in place. That was why I couldn't recognize him at first until I heard someone whispering his name!

    We really missed the chance to talk to him. But it was already very late.
    I wish him well.
    ..Loh, you must've been overly pre-occupied with all the delicious food that you totally ignored the fine & dapper gentleman..

    I wonder what did Mr. Tan whisper to Krisna??..**Fictional**Maybe he said:
    "I'm in a bit of mood to play some baddy tonight. Do you know if any of your friends here would like to play with me?" And Krisna replied back "Uuhh, sorry, no can do, Uncle Tan. Do you see how full they are?? We doubled the order for each dish and they finished them all. Sorry, not this time, maybe next time, Uncle Tan"....and there goes the chance...
    Last edited by ctjcad; 07-02-2008 at 05:15 AM.

  8. #8
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    I saw Tan Joe Hok playing against Australia in Melbourne in the 1957/58 Thomas Cup Preliminary Challenge Round. Joe Hok is, I am sure, older than 68 years of age, perhaps closer to 71. At that time he did not strike me as brilliant. I believe the then native Australian champion he played against was Don Murray, and the match went to rubber. At that time a friend of mine, Ong Eng Hong, the then Australian Open champion, could thrash Don Murray quite easily. Maybe Joe Hok was just taking it easy when Indonesia played Australia in 1957.

  9. #9
    Regular Member huangkwokhau's Avatar
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    We were lucky and met him several times.........

  10. #10
    Regular Member huangkwokhau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jkusmanto View Post
    There is a gossip right now in Indonesia that PBSI will point Tan Joe Hok to replace Icuk as a directur of training in a few days.

    TJH (who now is a directur of development in PBSI) is a first Indonesia player to win MS in All England in 1959.
    It will very interesting if TJH is pointed. Because he will be the fourth old player to take the job after Rudy, Christian and Icuk.

    Hendra Kartenegara (his official name) received a Distinguished Associates Award from IBF ini 1987.
    Hm...Let me find out more......

  11. #11
    Regular Member huangkwokhau's Avatar
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    During China Open ( GZ), we met him and he told us his whole life, badminton....it was very interesting....

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    Quote Originally Posted by huangkwokhau View Post
    Hm...Let me find out more......
    This issue was posted 3 years ago.
    Still relevant now?

  13. #13
    Regular Member huangkwokhau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jagdpanther View Post
    This issue was posted 3 years ago.
    Still relevant now?
    ...Actually, Icuk now is campaigning himself being PBSI's chairman along with Tommy Soeharto, our sport Minister and another military guy....
    I hope They do not elect Icuk as he has mismanaged many things and also known as NOT friendly toward Chinese Indonesian players...
    Even his Car's ID is P 13 S I, if you put number 1 and 3 together becomes B..so it is PBSI...

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    Quote Originally Posted by huangkwokhau View Post
    ...Actually, Icuk now is campaigning himself being PBSI's chairman along with Tommy Soeharto, our sport Minister and another military guy....
    I hope They do not elect Icuk as he has mismanaged many things and also known as NOT friendly toward Chinese Indonesian players...
    Even his Car's ID is P 13 S I, if you put number 1 and 3 together becomes B..so it is PBSI...
    So you prefer this 'military guy' then?
    Well, he isn't known for his reputation. But surely he HAS money. BIG TIME!

    Anyone dare enough to declare, "If I am elected, INA will cleansweep OG medal in OG 2012!"?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by huangkwokhau View Post
    During China Open ( GZ), we met him and he told us his whole life, badminton....it was very interesting....
    Yup...me and Hau-Ge had dinner with Om Tan and a Doctor in GZ. Had nice conversation with him!

  16. #16
    Regular Member ctjcad's Avatar
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    Default Hmm..

    Quote Originally Posted by taneepak View Post
    ...Joe Hok is, I am sure, older than 68 years of age, perhaps closer to 71.
    ...
    ..yes, he is 71 yrs old. He was born on August 11, 1937. You're lucky also, taneepak, to have watched Mr. Tan play...Even though without him, seemingly, playing at 100% capacity..
    Quote Originally Posted by huangkwokhau View Post
    We were lucky and met him several times.........
    Quote Originally Posted by huangkwokhau View Post
    During China Open ( GZ), we met him and he told us his whole life, badminton....it was very interesting....
    Quote Originally Posted by badMania View Post
    Yup...me and Hau-Ge had dinner with Om Tan and a Doctor in GZ. Had nice conversation with him!
    ..i hope you guys still have his business card. Who knows, maybe you guys can contact him & can chip in to be a part of the movie..
    Quote Originally Posted by huangkwokhau View Post
    Hm...Let me find out more......
    Quote Originally Posted by Jagdpanther View Post
    This issue was posted 3 years ago.
    Still relevant now?
    Quote Originally Posted by huangkwokhau View Post
    ...Actually, Icuk now is campaigning himself being PBSI's chairman along with Tommy Soeharto, our sport Minister and another military guy....
    I hope They do not elect Icuk as he has mismanaged many things and also known as NOT friendly toward Chinese Indonesian players...
    Even his Car's ID is P 13 S I, if you put number 1 and 3 together becomes B..so it is PBSI...
    ..yes, this thread was an old news, but instead of opening a new thread, i just use it as a platform for his recent news.

    Off topic: Speaking of PBSI's new chairman, ehm, don't you guys think our Krisna should be running/campaigning for it??.. I mean, Krisna is the only candidate, out of those lot, that has been a frequent poster in BC and he does have a deep concern and passion in making badminton the pride of Indonesia, again....Don't you guys think so??..
    Last edited by ctjcad; 07-02-2008 at 11:37 AM.

  17. #17
    Moderator Oldhand's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by taneepak View Post
    [...]Joe Hok is, I am sure, older than 68 years of age, perhaps closer to 71. [...]
    He is indeed 71.
    The '68' was posted in 2005

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