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  1. #1
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    Default What will be Lin Dan names if he is a Korean/Malaysian Chinese/Japanese/HongKong/etc

    Just for fun

    For those who cannot understand what is this all about, i should explain like this. The Chinese, Malaysian Chinese, Korean, Japanese all have names in the Chinese characters.

    Chinese characters have different pronounciation in different regions. For example, the character "Lin" (as in Lin Dan) is pronounced as "Hayashi" in Japanese, "Lam" in Cantonese/Hong Kong, and of course "Lin" in Chinese language, etc

    For Malaysian Chinese names, although they are always read in Mandarin, but in the identity card/birth cert, it is not written in pinyin mostly, but most of the time, wrriten in pronounciation in Cantonese or Hokkien or other dialect or mix of them.

    HOwever, compare to others, Korean less use chinese character in their names.

    Lin Dan

    Malaysian Chinese - Lim Tan
    Japanese - Hayashi xxx(dunno how 2 pronounce character 'dan' in japanese)
    Hong Kong - Lam Tan
    Korean - ??


    Wong Choong Hann
    Chinese - Huang Zhonghan
    Hong Kong - Wong Chung Hon
    Japanese - ???
    Korean - ???


    Zhao Jianhua
    Malaysian Chinese - Chew Ken Wah
    Hong Kong - Chiu Kin Wa
    Japanese - xxx

  2. #2
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    actually when pronoucing Lin Dan in Cantonese its Lum Dan. Lam is usually the written surname.

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    Quote Originally Posted by weeyet
    Just for fun

    For those who cannot understand what is this all about, i should explain like this. The Chinese, Malaysian Chinese, Korean, Japanese all have names in the Chinese characters.

    Chinese characters have different pronounciation in different regions. For example, the character "Lin" (as in Lin Dan) is pronounced as "Hayashi" in Japanese, "Lam" in Cantonese/Hong Kong, and of course "Lin" in Chinese language, etc

    For Malaysian Chinese names, although they are always read in Mandarin, but in the identity card/birth cert, it is not written in pinyin mostly, but most of the time, wrriten in pronounciation in Cantonese or Hokkien or other dialect or mix of them.

    HOwever, compare to others, Korean less use chinese character in their names.

    Lin Dan

    Malaysian Chinese - Lim Tan
    Japanese - Hayashi xxx(dunno how 2 pronounce character 'dan' in japanese)
    Hong Kong - Lam Tan
    Korean - ??


    Wong Choong Hann
    Chinese - Huang Zhonghan
    Hong Kong - Wong Chung Hon
    Japanese - ???
    Korean - ???


    Zhao Jianhua
    Malaysian Chinese - Chew Ken Wah
    Hong Kong - Chiu Kin Wa
    Japanese - xxx

    Do you have their names in Kanji? I might be able to help

  4. #4
    Regular Member winstonchan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by weeyet
    Just for fun

    Zhao Jianhua
    Malaysian Chinese - Chew Ken Wah
    Hong Kong - Chiu Kin Wa
    Japanese - xxx
    I think it should be Chiu Kim Wa in Hong Kong cantonese pronunciation

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neosakai
    Do you have their names in Kanji? I might be able to help
    Lin Dan - 林丹
    Wong Choong Hann - 黄宗翰
    Zhao Jianhua - 赵剑华

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by weeyet
    Just for fun

    For those who cannot understand what is this all about, i should explain like this. The Chinese, Malaysian Chinese, Korean, Japanese all have names in the Chinese characters.

    Chinese characters have different pronounciation in different regions. For example, the character "Lin" (as in Lin Dan) is pronounced as "Hayashi" in Japanese, "Lam" in Cantonese/Hong Kong, and of course "Lin" in Chinese language, etc

    For Malaysian Chinese names, although they are always read in Mandarin, but in the identity card/birth cert, it is not written in pinyin mostly, but most of the time, wrriten in pronounciation in Cantonese or Hokkien or other dialect or mix of them.

    HOwever, compare to others, Korean less use chinese character in their names.

    Lin Dan
    Malaysian Chinese - Lim Tan
    Japanese - Hayashi xxx(dunno how 2 pronounce character 'dan' in japanese)
    Hong Kong - Lam Tan
    Korean - ??


    Wong Choong Hann
    Chinese - Huang Zhonghan
    Hong Kong - Wong Chung Hon
    Japanese - ???
    Korean - ???


    Zhao Jianhua
    Malaysian Chinese - Chew Ken Wah
    Hong Kong - Chiu Kin Wa
    Japanese - xxx
    oh oh, interesting what about cai yun and fu haifeng in malaysian chinese, cantonese, japanese, korean and so on ??

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qidong
    Wong Choong Hann - 黄宗翰
    should be 黄综翰.........

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by weeyet

    Lin Dan

    Japanese - Hayashi xxx(dunno how 2 pronounce character 'dan' in japanese)
    learn a new word today, Lin Dan will become Hayashi Tan in Japan.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by yannie
    oh oh, interesting what about cai yun and fu haifeng in malaysian chinese, cantonese, japanese, korean and so on ??
    Cai Yun 蔡赟
    Malaysian Chinese - Chua Yin
    Cantonese - Choy XXX

    Fu Haifeng 付海峰
    Malaysian Chinese - Foo Hai Fong
    Japanese - XXX KaiXX

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neosakai
    Do you have their names in Kanji? I might be able to help
    May I Know what is Kanji?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by madturtle
    May I Know what is Kanji?
    Kanji is the chinese characters weeyet was talking about.

    http://www.kanjisite.com/html/wak/wak4.html

  12. #12
    Regular Member jug8man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by madturtle
    May I Know what is Kanji?

    Chinese characters or ideograms used in Japanese writing. The characters may have different meanings from their Chinese counterparts. See Hiragana and Katakana.
    www-106.ibm.com/developerworks/library/glossaries/unicode.html


    (kahn-gee) is Japanese for "Chinese (kan) characters (ji)." These characters originated in China approximately 4000 years ago, and were imported into Japan, where they were adapted to the Japanese spoken language. Consequently, kanji are very close to the Chinese hanzi and share many identical characters, although they are pronounced differently (eg, "kan" instead of "han," and "ji" instead of "zi"). Kanji are sometimes (loosely) called ideograms as they generally represent ideas or objects, although they are frequently used only phonetically. The other Japanese characters sets - hiragana, katakana, and romaji - are exclusively phonetic. Some words consist of just one kanji
    www.aproposinc.com/pages/asiantrm.htm




    cheers

    8man

  13. #13
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    woah, thanks for that detailed explanation. sounds like a tuitorial.

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