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View Poll Results: where do you contact during a backhand serve?

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  • near racket top

    213 37.30%
  • sweet spot

    333 58.32%
  • near t-joint

    25 4.38%
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  1. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by chris@ccc View Post
    .
    taneepak ... Again, we have come to another stroke which is easier to be done for a left-handed player... the Service that you have just described.

    Many comments have been made about the 'Sliced Dropshot' performed by a left-handed player.

    Yes, there are also pros and cons for being a right-handed or a left-handed player as well.
    .
    Actually, it is the same slice motion, irrespective of whether it is executed by a right-hander or a left-hander. In the doubles backhand serve, the short serve that is sliced in an unorthodox way, namely from right to left for a right-hander is the same as one that is sliced from left to right by a left-hander. The serve/slice movement is inwards not outwards. An outward sliced serve will not make the shuttle wobble. Only an inward sliced serve does funny things to the shuttle. Serving with an outward slice is easy because of your hand's natural tendency to move away. With an inward slice serve, the movement looks like a side-to-side slice with no foreward movement of the racquet, which makes it very difficult to master this type of serve.

  2. #70
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    As an experiment, I tried hitting serves from near the top of the racket, and I was astonished by the difference it made. The serve trajectory become much less disobedient and, despite a few ballooned efforts (due to me getting used to the new technique), I was clipping the tape and grazing the service line at least twice as many times as before.

    I'll try hitting from near the throat on Friday. I am theorizing that since the (racket) throat is closer to the serving hand than the (racket) nose is, any variations in power will be cut down to the minimum by serving from here.

  3. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gollum View Post
    Interesting idea.

    I always serve on (or near) the sweetspot, and I expect most people do the same. I will have to try this suggestion

    I imagine this method would make slice serves very difficult.
    How do you mean slice serve? Is spinning the shuttle not illegal in service?

  4. #72
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    Yes, spinning the shuttle is not illegal in service.

  5. #73
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    I haven't really noticed where my contact point is for my backhand serve.
    I'll check it out later today and tell you all later.

  6. #74
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    I used to serve on or near the sweet spot, but my doubles partner suggested I try hitting the bird near the top of the racket and have been doing so ever since. I slice serve on the sweet spot still, but everything else is near the top. I find I can keep my short serves consistently lower this way. Also I find it way easier to drive and flick serve. I noticed I was sometime unintentionally slicing the bird before, which led to problems with my flick serve.

  7. #75
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    I ave just employed this new technique into my serve. My serves are more consistently lower to the tape now but I find a lot of my serves are short than wot they were before but I ave practiced last 3 times hitting 300 serves in total and I am now getting the distance pretty good.

    This is a great technique! Keep it to urself now guys lol. For the serve can b a great weapon esp in doubles for getting on the attack!

  8. #76
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    Yeah, sometimes just trying new things does certainly help. Just little things like the way you hold the shuttle, the grip, stance, set up. Never hurts to try

  9. #77
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    Hmm. Don't know if it's something peculiar to where I play or get coached but I've always had the explanation that you always hit your serve with the top of your racquet. Nothing to do with sweet spots but keeping the shuttle still.

    Reason being, if you try & put the shuttle at the sweet spot the majority of your hand is in the path of your swing. The only way to serve is to let go of the shuttle, get your hand out of the way and then hit it.

    If you hit it with the tip of the racquet the majority of your hand is not in path of the swing. You can let go of the shuttle later, so it doesn't start falling & the angle of the cork doesn't drop toward vertical.
    This means you don't have to track how it's falling, you can aim the shuttle at the tape. You can also look at the tape as you know where the shuttle is.

  10. #78
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    The actual proper way of serving is to perform slice serve when you serve with backhand. Because when the shuttle is strike, the shuttle should fall onto the service line because of the speed and the rotation of the shuttle.

    Striking the shuttle at a serve on the T-Joint, Sweet Spot, or Racquet top will not cause this effect, in fact serving it on the side of the racquet will cause this effect.
    Much like when you perform a slice- drop shot you slice the shuttle on the side of your racquet not the top, sweet spot nor t-joint.



  11. #79
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    It's illegal to slice in the serve... The rules quite clearly state that you should hit the cork first, hence slicing is illegal.

  12. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trmun View Post
    It's illegal to slice in the serve... The rules quite clearly state that you should hit the cork first, hence slicing is illegal.
    Your premise is correct, but does not entail your conclusion. Spelling out your argument (with unstated premise):

    • Premise 1: the laws require that the server's initial contact with the shuttle shall be on the base (cork)
    • Premise 2: all slicing involves contacting the feathers first, or the feathers and base together
    • Conclusion: slicing is illegal on serve



    The second premise is false. Slicing sometimes involves contacting the feathers first (or together with the base), but this usually leads to your losing control of the shot. Indeed, it was this "out of control" effect that led to the S-serve being so effective: it was reportedly impossible to track the shuttle, which swerved and tumbled crazily.

    More often, slicing involves hitting the base first. You may then go on to hit the feathers too, or maybe not.

    You can play slices without contacting the feathers at all; so it's perfectly possible to slice the serve legally.
    Last edited by Gollum; 12-06-2009 at 12:13 PM.

  13. #81
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    Good thread!

    In the past week, just by changing the contact point from sweet spot to top of the racket has immensely improved my serves. They are now perfectly consistent just over the tape and just over the service line. Somehow, the strings are tighter here and provide much better control on power input and direction.

    Even my usual playing buddies were surprised by my serves and asked me what I changed. But of course, I just said I practiced lots without letting on about this little change in contact point!
    Last edited by visor; 05-15-2010 at 07:29 PM.

  14. #82
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    Haha! Now they know :P! That is if they're BF members...

    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    Good thread!

    In the past week, just by changing the contact point from sweet spot to top of the racket has immensely improved my serves. They are now perfectly consistent just over the tape and just over the service line. Somehow, the strings are tighter here and provide much better control on power input and direction.

    Even my usual playing buddies were surprised by my serves and asked me what I changed. But of course, I just said I practiced lots without letting on about this little change in contact point!

  15. #83
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    See How Cai yun teaches net play and backhand serve.


    You are not supposed to hit the sweet spot. To be able to consistently hit to the same spot, for me, there is a slight (only slight) slicing action.

    Anyway, just watch cai yun teach... ...




  16. #84
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    There's an unclear line between the "correct" way and the trend

    Although, Cai Yun did say it's better to contact the shuttle slightly towards the top-edge of the racket rather than directly within the sweetspot at center of the racket

    It's arguable because some professionals do it this way, some do it that way.

    I've personally tried out both, and found the edge better though. More consistent serves and easier to control the serve hitting there than the sweetspot, but maybe that's just me.

  17. #85
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    ^ If Cai Yun says it's better this way, that's all I need to know.

    And definitely, the top edge is certainly more stable and consistent for me in controlling height and distance.

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