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  1. #1
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    Lightbulb Need Help: How to Organize a Badminton Tournament 101

    We managed to start up the RsM Badminton Club, which has a healthy following of members, many of whom are players from here on the BFs! And though attendance has been slowly but steadily growing, it still needs an extra kick to make the club break even with the rental costs. What's been suggested by members is that one of the best ways to promote a club is to host a tournament... troubles is, I've never done this before. I've organized martial arts tournaments before, but it's a totally different ballpark by sheer virtue of the nature of the prizes, and the number of competitors.

    In the process I figured that perhaps we could all learn something together by making it an open discussion.

    So what I'm asking for is for some advice. What have you done as a tournament organizer to make your tournament a success? What have you as a competitor in a tournament appreciated/disliked about it?

    I've got a lot of questions, but maybe by just opening up the subject, a few of them will answer themselves.

    A few topics, such as the "Knight to remember" thing, have been mentioned, and I don't really ened that reiiterated since it's got it's own thread (thanks Devlicious).

    My ideas so far is to charge a fee of around 15$ CAD for entry in one event, 20$ for participation in two events. The events so far are mixed doubles, and mens doubles. If I get enough teams, I will also open up a womens doubles category. There will be no rankings for the tournament-- I'm not affiliated with the local leagues.

    So a few of my questions in particular-- from your experiences, have most small tournaments been best 2 out of 3 matches per stage? What do you suppose is the minimum number of teams I should have to make a worthwhile, fun womens doubles category? What about prizes-- how many people should get prizes? Not just the top players of each category, but I mean, how far down the pyramid should prizes trickle?

    Etc. Etc. Etc.

    Please bring up any thoughts you think are relevant!

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    So you want some publicity? Send it round through the grapevine but you may want to limit numbers if you have to book courts. Maybe on a first come first served basis.

    You only have two events. So Round robin is very appropriate (3 or 4 per group) and helps people feel they got enough time on court. I suggest one game up to 21 points (3 games might take up a lot of time and tires people out for the elimination rounds!!). Winners and/or 2nd placing go through to a knock out format.

    So you want a theme? I suggest have one if you want a really big tournament. Otherwise you use the themes up on a small tournament and no more ideas left for the big ones! Alternatively, you could find some organisation willing to lend their name though. e.g. a chinese/vietnamese association. Then they may help supply the trophies or even help a bit with some of the other costs.

    Small tournament = small trophies. Winner and runner up only.

    In my experience, the biggest headache is calculating the court time needed. I allocate 20 minutes to a 21 point game and 15 minutes to a 15 point game. Granted that some games finish faster, and some are slower. At the beginning, some people have a tendency to warm up a long time (like 10 minutes). This can really harm the organisation in terms of court time and rest time for other players (in later stages of tournament). Even if people are reminded of warm up time limitation to 2 minutes, it's frequently not observed. The tournament organiser has to physicially walk up to the players and ask them to start the game.

    Get games flowing to get people where they should be...on court. In my experience as a competitor, frustration sets in when games are there to be played but 3 courts out of 4 have no game arranged. It happens all the time but keep it minimal.

    On the other hand the opposite situation can happen. I had a free court for a round robin tournament. Two pairs asked to play a match earlier since they were hanging around. I had to say 'no' because it upset the match schedule - it would have meant at another later stage, a couple of pairs would have had to play 3 consecutive matches without a break (this was a small tournament withe only 6 hours of court time spread over two dates). People didn't really understand why I was so strict. It was only later that one of my committee members realised the implications of what would have happened.

    You always get some strong minded competitors voicing their own opinions. State clearly on the entry form that the decision of the tournament organisor is FINAL! This will save you some headaches.

    Players play to their own line calls. Make this point very clear. Don't let spectators call shuttles that are in/out! Or rather let the players understand line calls cannot be decided upon by spectators. If there are disputes, replay the point and appoint impartial people to watch the lines.

    Don't have line judges as a routine for every match. You find your manpower needs outweigh your supply (and your stress levels will go higher!). I actually did away with line judges when I took over of running a tournament. It's tempting to use other players standing around to act as line judges - don't do this!
    i) there is the potential for conflict of interest
    ii) the line judge might need to play their own match and have to be changed !

    Since it is your first time, I think it's good to idea to start off with just doubles. Then later, get a feel from your badminton community on the feedback. Adding singles later on for another time may be an option.

    Do not be a tournament organiser and a player at the same time! You get interrupted all the time. Or get a 2nd-in-command who has experience of entering tournaments (not necessarily badminton).

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    Cheung, thanks very much for your help.

    With regards to the line judges, you make a very good point. Since it's a fundraising event to raise rent money for the club, everyone working with me is strictly volunteers, and so we're trying to save manpower whever we can, and so that's sorta two birds with one stone... as far as conflicts go, I was planning on getting a copy of official badminton rules (like the ones here on BC) and putting them on the website where contestants would submit entry forms. Part of the entry form would state that people have read and understood the rules-- and since there will be no referees/umpires for individual matches, everything will indeed be self-governed by the players on court. If there's ever a real ambiguity, then the players are to replay the point.

    The round robin idea sounds like great way to go! Many of the ones around here are usually single elimination, so it's funny but I completely forgot about the concept. 21 point games sounds like a very good idea, something I wouldn't have thought of...

    The thing I like mostly about the round robin idea is that it makes most efficient use of the courts. I was previously thinking three 15 point rounds of single elimination, but not only does that suck if your first round is against the strongest team, but I was having a nightmare trying to calculate how to book the gym time, since single elimination would have had the number of matches gradually tapering off.

    What would one usually suggest as prizes (realistically)? Unfortunately, by the time I want to have my tournament, it'd take too long for my suppliers to work out a sponsorship plan-- that'd have to wait for the second tournament, in a distant future. So for now, we're operating on a sponsorless prize budget. I was thinking along the lines of t-shirts, rackets, shoes and bags. Of the bunch, I'd want to give away rackets most, however the problem I see with this is that players often don't appreciate these kinds of things because top players usually already have expensive rackets of their own. Shoes I figure are a great idea, but the problem is that I won't have sizes on hand so it'd have to be raincheck-based... which may be kind of a let down if players actually want to bring something home with them. T-shirts--- well, that seems like great for runners ups or just for participants in general, but i doubt that'll satisfy the winners.

    I was considering medals, but how do players feel about medals in a tournament where there won't be a particularly grand ceremony at the end?...

    I'm wondering mostly, I suppose, if people come to tournaments for the prizes, or if they come for the competition or if they come just for the fun of it... this will influence how I balance the prize budget between trying to get prizes for just the winners, or a bit of a prize (at least something small) for everyone.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jinryu
    The round robin idea sounds like great way to go! Many of the ones around here are usually single elimination, so it's funny but I completely forgot about the concept. 21 point games sounds like a very good idea, something I wouldn't have thought of...

    The thing I like mostly about the round robin idea is that it makes most efficient use of the courts. I was previously thinking three 15 point rounds of single elimination, but not only does that suck if your first round is against the strongest team, but I was having a nightmare trying to calculate how to book the gym time, since single elimination would have had the number of matches gradually tapering off..
    The good thing about round robin is that you can book a session of 3 hours for 4 courts, and then quickly reduce the courts needed. Straight elimination...well, like you said, it becomes a nightmare.

    Straight elimination is no fun if you get knocked out of the 1st round. I mean, lots of people will say why bother entering and then travelling at all for just one game. Giving people the knowledge of at least two games, and maybe three, will improve number of entries.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jinryu
    What would one usually suggest as prizes (realistically)? Unfortunately, by the time I want to have my tournament, it'd take too long for my suppliers to work out a sponsorship plan-- that'd have to wait for the second tournament, in a distant future. So for now, we're operating on a sponsorless prize budget. I was thinking along the lines of t-shirts, rackets, shoes and bags. Of the bunch, I'd want to give away rackets most, however the problem I see with this is that players often don't appreciate these kinds of things because top players usually already have expensive rackets of their own. Shoes I figure are a great idea, but the problem is that I won't have sizes on hand so it'd have to be raincheck-based... which may be kind of a let down if players actually want to bring something home with them. T-shirts--- well, that seems like great for runners ups or just for participants in general, but i doubt that'll satisfy the winners..
    Too ambitious - you must be entering all the pro tournaments! If you really want to give something of use, try a racquet bag or a nice T-shirt. Get large size for guys and medium for girls. If it were me, I'd get something really modest (cos number of entries is largely unknown). Some small trophies with the engraving "1st RsM Badminton Club tournament" for winners, and a medal for the runnersup. Large trophies are just no use. They take up too much space - mine are dumped in a little used room at work.
    So,
    racquets= no
    Shoes=no
    racquet bag= possible (limited budget though!)
    T shirt = possible
    medals = possible
    Couple of tubes of feather shuttles? = an option (dunno if you plan feather or nylon for the tournament)


    Quote Originally Posted by Jinryu
    I was considering medals, but how do players feel about medals in a tournament where there won't be a particularly grand ceremony at the end?...

    I'm wondering mostly, I suppose, if people come to tournaments for the prizes, or if they come for the competition or if they come just for the fun of it... this will influence how I balance the prize budget between trying to get prizes for just the winners, or a bit of a prize (at least something small) for everyone.
    I'm a bit surprised by this question. By the sounds of it, you should be mainly aiming for regular players in the local area (within an hours drive). Are you honestly expect Provincial/National players to come to a small club tournament?

    When you yourself enter local tournaments, what do you expect from the tournament? For competition, or the fun, or both?

    My view is only winners and runners up get a token of appreciation. They get their modest prizes presented from the tournament organisor. Of course, the situation may be different in your locality. Do tournaments usually give prizes out to losers as a norm? If so, the entry fees must be really high to cover the costs!

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    Good luck..it's a tough job but someone gotta do it !!

    Round robin to 21 pts highly recommended. Elimination is no good as some may not bother to sign up. Mention the minimum # of games guaranteed.
    SF & Finals could be 2 out of 3.

    Prizes given out depends on your budget. If budget permits, random door prize is an idea.

    Prizes suggestion:
    Gift cert to badminton store(s)
    Grips
    Bags
    Feather/nylon shuttles
    T-shirts
    Other type of Gift certs.

    To get games moving smoothly:
    Have a waiting list of games that are to go on Court 1, Court 2 etc.

    All the best to you.

  6. #6
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    I really appreciate round robin based games where people in the same category are divided into two pools. In the pools, participants play 1 game of 15 pts. A game of 21 would be ok too, but it might become tiring depending on the size of the pool (and is longer! if you played in the Guy-Favreau YMCA bad. tournament, you'd know what i mean). That way, although the games end quickly, it is a good way of energy saving. And participants have nothing to complain about since they play many games. When the teams have played all the others in their respective group. The top two pairs "get out" of the pool -here comes the semis. If you're doing round robin, you won't need hundreds of participants to make the tournament fun, since people will all be playing many games. I'd say 20 per category is more than enough.

    Personally, as a player, I think the draw sheets are very important. I like to be informed about who my opponents are and, more importantly, when I'll be playing (approximatively). The sheets should be posted in a clear area where players can check them out without creating traffic jam. I just hate those times where a huge crowd gathers around the control table to see the draws, leaving players who come to give the scores a little disoriented. And, needless to say, the draw sheets should be updated on a regular basis. Also, as some players may participate in two categories, you need to make a schedule so their games don't conflict with each other. Maybe finish the XD first, then start MD after or vice versa. It'll also allow players who play in one category to estimate when to arrive.

    As for prizes, I believe anyone who gets into the finals deserve one. I agree with Cheung in the choice of rewards. Winners don't usually expect to win a racket, since, as it has been discussed numerous times already, each person has his own suitable racket. As for shoes, it'd be such a pain to match the sizes and the value might be just too high to give out pairs to every winner. To keep it simple, avoid giving out stuff that has specific sizes for each person. In the championship hosted by BK and Lucien Laverdure, as a finalist, I was a just too speechless when I received a pack of grips and well, a pair of... BK socks. The socks were somewhat like 4 sizes bigger and were therefore of no use. LOL. I still can't help laughing at the choice of prize. Anyway, comparing to rackets and shoes, bags can be a really good choice. I mean, they aren't as expensive compared to the first two but are very practical items. Gift certificates are also pretty good. The two most popular (are they the only specialist stores around?) badminton stores I know of would be Tenniszon and Lucien Laverdure. I know many would be happy if they get money to spend at these stores. And, if not, last but not least, you own an online store! Why not reward people with gift certificates to your store? That way, you can both promote/advertise for your own shop and get to sell stock! If you have additional funds left, you can always get additional prizes such as grips, shuttles, wristbands and maybe even a racket (then again, there are preferences...) for draw. It's always fun to have a souvenir from tournaments we participate in.

    Regarding medals, I don't know if it's necessary, since this won't really be a big tournament. What I mean is, you might want to spend that money elsewhere. Why not make some RsM keychains for each participant (just a suggestion, cuz I have no clue about the costs)?

    One last note: you're thinking of charging 15 CAD/category and 20 for both. Wouldn't this be a little "unfair" for girls since they can only play in one category? As there'll probably be less girls, perhaps you can make a third category in the tournament: WS (11 pts round robin)?

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    Devilicious has some valid points.

    Regarding the scoring system, I think 21 points is mandatory if the group has 3/4 pairs. If you have 5 pairs, things get a little tricky and you may have to reduce to 15 points to get through the exponential number of games required (plus the getting tired factor may start to arise)

    Once you have 6 pairs in a group...seriously consider splitting it into 2 groups.


    Personally, as a player, I think the draw sheets are very important. I like to be informed about who my opponents are and, more importantly, when I'll be playing (approximatively). The sheets should be posted in a clear area where players can check them out without creating traffic jam. I just hate those times where a huge crowd gathers around the control table to see the draws, leaving players who come to give the scores a little disoriented. And, needless to say, the draw sheets should be updated on a regular basis. Also, as some players may participate in two categories, you need to make a schedule so their games don't conflict with each other. Maybe finish the XD first, then start MD after or vice versa. It'll also allow players who play in one category to estimate when to arrive.
    Agree, agree but it depends on the numbers of competitors. Something to always bear in mind.

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    Just a big GOOD LUCK & ALL THE BEST with organising the tournament. I have helped organised tournment once before and realised how hard it is and how strict you have be in keeping to your plans and schedules. Don't be influenced by players suggestions or complaints easily, cos none of them will understand the full picture. Other BC members here have covered more than what I can offer. They all gave very good and solid points and I wish your tournament a successful one.

    winston

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    You're running a tournament for fund raising or to promote your club ?. If its is for fund raising, in my many years experiences of running local to international level that tournaments has never made money. Do you sum carefully and soon you will find out. The implication is if you charge to much your number will be down.
    This is my suggestion, run a friendly competition where no trophies will be given (can be round robin) and us players to donate foods for after match.
    Many ways can make it attractive, fund and competitive by winner stay on court until beaten or pull out (for rest) or winner stay and challenger keep finding new partner.

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    Jinryu

    If you go for 21 point elimination, one option is to have a plate event. Losers of all first rounds go into another draw for the plate. The rest go on for the champ and runner up. That way, everyone would get at least 2 games? So that means you'd have 3 prizes: Champ, Runner-Up, and Plate.

    If the purpose of this tourney is to promote your club, some gifts ideas would be

    - vouchers for your badminton club nights
    - vouchers for racquet stringing
    - vouchers for discount off buying any product off your website (no harm in some shameless marketing )
    - vouchers for any shop around your area that's willing to provide discount! (tuckshop, some sports shop, restaurants, whomever might appreciate the publicity I guess)

    good luck

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    Hi Jinryu,


    It is always good to hear a new club is trying to promote oneself to attract new members into its courts!


    Although I have only organized a few tournaments / events in the past years, here are some of the factors that may help you in organizing your tournament.


    (1) Determine the format (F) of the tourney
    ie/ single knockout, double knockout, drop-flight ABCD, round-robin


    (2) Determine the number games (G) per match
    ie/ one game to 21 points, best out of 3 to 15 points


    (3) Based on G, determine the how much time (T) is required per match on average
    ie/ for 30 minutes T=0.5, for one hour T=1


    (4) Calculate the number of matches (M) based on the number of teams (t) [ex/ 16,32,64]
    ie/ single knockout M=t-1, double knockout M=2t-1, etc.


    (5) Based on the number of courts (C), determine how many gym hours (H) is required
    ie/ H=MT/C, this will give you the “minimum” time required


    (6) Based on GTM, determine how many feather or plastic shuttles (S) will be consumed


    (7) Determine the approximate cost of food (F), door prizes (P), and awards (A)


    (8) Presuming break-even, calculate the entry fee (E) per team
    ie/ E=(H+S+F+P+A)/t




    You will now need to determine if the entry fee is at a reasonable cost that players will be interested in playing your tournament. Often, the entry fee is high unless you find ways to reduce the over-all cost, example


    - restrict the number of shuttles allowed per match

    - increase the number of teams, decrease the number of guaranteed matches

    - find local businesses near the facility who can donate door-prizes in exchange for advertising, such as a coffee or pizza shop who may benefit from players patronizing their shop in between matches on the day of the tournament, or have the facility that you are renting the gym from offer some simple door prizes

    - use shuttles as awards for the winners & runner-ups, or the remaining new shuttles as door prizes

    - have the players bring some snacks & fruits as a “pot-luck” way of sharing food & drinks

    - you can design & print tourny t-shirts as long as players pre-order


    And Now For Some Reality Check!

    Unless you already have a strong commitment from existing members willing to join your tournament, set a limit on the number of teams rather than accepting every entry.

    Having too many events (ex/ MS, MD, WD, MXD) with small number of teams will be difficult. It may be better just to have one doubles event, regardless gender.

    Take every opportunity to not have a court empty unless it's near the finals. Players usually don't like waiting, plus if you finish early, eliminated players can have some free play time.

    Definitely, get a few volunteers to help setup the tables, food and stuff while you look after the entry fees & draws, plus have 1 or 2 players (or 1 non-player) as your co-organizer and who knows the procedure of the tournament when you're on the courts.


    Cheers! (for now...)

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    Hi all,

    I'm really moved by everyone's well wishes and suggestions! Thank you all in advance for all your help-- if a month or so down the road you hear me posting that the tournament went well, then you can credit yourselves for some of the work. From what I'm reading, it seems that I may have been biting off more than I can chew in terms of going crazy with the prizes-- as pointed out, it is a local tournament and not a provincial finals, so starting out small and manageably might be wiser. I guess my enthusiasm to get this thing started really has me reaching, but this is why I ask you guys so that I can get a slap of reality.

    As to some of the ideas:

    • gift certificates to my own store. Hell, why didn't I think of that?!
    • What does the 'Flight ABCD' thing mean? I'm not familiar with the terminology.
    • I realize that female participants will likely be the minority-- I was wondering, do you think it wise to charge less for women to maybe encourage their joining? Or do you think that this is patronizing? So, I was thinking, perhaps the price would be 15$ for men to join one event, 20$ to join both, and for women, it'd be 10$ for one event, 20$ for both? I'm basing this on the fact that I don't even know if we'll have a womens doubles event yet, it depends on how many people. ( i realize that the men's two-event thing is not proportional, but i don't think someone would pay 25$...)
    • I was also thinking that in order to get a good idea of how many people are actually going to be there, the prices I've already stated are if you register with us at least a week before the tournament... anything else is going to be 5$ more, and there's a chance that we won't even have anymore space. I figure, that's a pretty hefty price (20$ for man to participate in a single event, 15$ for a woman to participate in a single event) but the whole point is that I want people to register in advance, and not leave everything to the last minute which would be problematic for the planning. At the same time, I'd like to leave the possibility (though not guarentee) of just showing up at the last minute and finding a spot.
    • Sorry to dwell on the prizes thing so much, but the whole thing about a pack of grips and socks is just too hilarious. Can you guys tell me about what prizes you got at some other tournaments, and how much you paid for entry, and how many games you got to play? I just want to make sure that what i'm charging is in a reasonable ballpark.
    • edit: I think I'll stick to the doubles categories for now-- singles just might take too much time and takes too much court space, i'm not confident enough of my planning abilities yet to mix that into the complexity as it is!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jinryu

    • gift certificates to my own store. Hell, why didn't I think of that?!
    • I realize that female participants will likely be the minority-- I was wondering, do you think it wise to charge less for women to maybe encourage their joining? Or do you think that this is patronizing? So, I was thinking, perhaps the price would be 15$ for men to join one event, 20$ to join both, and for women, it'd be 10$ for one event, 20$ for both? I'm basing this on the fact that I don't even know if we'll have a womens doubles event yet, it depends on how many people. ( i realize that the men's two-event thing is not proportional, but i don't think someone would pay 25$...)
    • I was also thinking that in order to get a good idea of how many people are actually going to be there, the prices I've already stated are if you register with us at least a week before the tournament... anything else is going to be 5$ more, and there's a chance that we won't even have anymore space. I figure, that's a pretty hefty price (20$ for man to participate in a single event, 15$ for a woman to participate in a single event) but the whole point is that I want people to register in advance, and not leave everything to the last minute which would be problematic for the planning. At the same time, I'd like to leave the possibility (though not guarentee) of just showing up at the last minute and finding a spot.
    • Sorry to dwell on the prizes thing so much, but the whole thing about a pack of grips and socks is just too hilarious. Can you guys tell me about what prizes you got at some other tournaments, and how much you paid for entry, and how many games you got to play? I just want to make sure that what i'm charging is in a reasonable ballpark.
    1. Nothing wrong to promote ur own store. Therefore, store credit/certificate would be a nice award for us badminton fanatics. Who does NOT want to get a $20 off for the next purchase / service?
    1.1 Don't worry about the prize might be small in market value. PPl come here to compete and to have fun (i.e. social). No one really come here to "get rich" or hope to get 50% of ur store stock share. As long as the event is well organized, I am sure ppl will think they get their $20 worth for entire day of fun and excitement.

    2. I don't think u really need to give out discount per gender, that will only give extra work for ur work. If a female player willing to participate, I doubt $5 will change her mind. Also, even if the female draw could be smaller, that means HIGHER chance for them to get a prize, right?

    3. Be prepared, as it's summer time, it's hard for ppl to plan event say 3-4 weeks in advance. Don't be surprised that 70% of the participants want to do the registration in the last 1-2 weeks. Therefore, say charge an extra $2 per event for late registration (after dead line, or at the door) could be good. However, just leave a small portion of draws to be filled (i.e no more than 15%) for the last minute participants.

    4. Round Robin might be the best bet, as it gives multiple games for participants, as well as u do NOT have worry about the final draw (i.e. fairly large amount of late participants or even at the door)
    Last edited by LazyBuddy; 06-22-2005 at 10:31 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jinryu
    • What does the 'Flight ABCD' thing mean? I'm not familiar with the terminology.
    • I realize that female participants will likely be the minority-- I was wondering, do you think it wise to charge less for women to maybe encourage their joining? Or do you think that this is patronizing? So, I was thinking, perhaps the price would be 15$ for men to join one event, 20$ to join both, and for women, it'd be 10$ for one event, 20$ for both? I'm basing this on the fact that I don't even know if we'll have a womens doubles event yet, it depends on how many people. ( i realize that the men's two-event thing is not proportional, but i don't think someone would pay 25$...)
    • I was also thinking that in order to get a good idea of how many people are actually going to be there, the prices I've already stated are if you register with us at least a week before the tournament... anything else is going to be 5$ more, and there's a chance that we won't even have anymore space. I figure, that's a pretty hefty price (20$ for man to participate in a single event, 15$ for a woman to participate in a single event) but the whole point is that I want people to register in advance, and not leave everything to the last minute which would be problematic for the planning. At the same time, I'd like to leave the possibility (though not guarentee) of just showing up at the last minute and finding a spot.
    • Sorry to dwell on the prizes thing so much, but the whole thing about a pack of grips and socks is just too hilarious. Can you guys tell me about what prizes you got at some other tournaments, and how much you paid for entry, and how many games you got to play? I just want to make sure that what i'm charging is in a reasonable ballpark.
    ABC's are ways to determine the player's level like in the provincial tournaments. But as yours won't be that official, I guess it can pass by. However, if you're thinking about dividing ppl with their level of play, then you can ask them to register for Advanced, intermediate or beginner level. Then again, it is very difficult to determine one's level as each person has his own standards. Maybe, just maybe (since I've never seen such alternative before), you can define ppl's level with their experience as a bad. player? What I mean is, set like 2 categories (AB) where A=5+ yrs of play and B=under 5 years of play. It might not be that accurate, since some play more often than others, but at least it avoids having really really strong players against ones who won't stand a chance.

    No I don't think it's a good idea to have girls pay less. And you might not even want to put a higher price on last minute registrations at the door as some might start bargaining with you and you'll explode before you know it.

    Prizes I've seen/got in tournaments: medals, trophies (only for championship) and door prizes for draw (t-shirts, rackets, grips, shuttles, gift certificates, towels, watches, bags, socks... etc. Yes, socks again) I think gift cert., grips, shuttles and towels are more suitable for everyone. T-shirts are ok at the limit, but the sizes usually are undesirable. Btw, in case you're still laughing at the socks I got, I just want to precise that a trophy and a gift certificate with a decent sum accompanied them.

    Also, from previous experience, always ask the winner of the match to bring back the two shuttles they used when giving the score. That way, you won't lose them as many have a tendency to keep the birds for themselves.

    As for food, I suggest you bring a thermal box to keep cold water and soft drinks. You can make lots of money by selling them during the tournament, especially water since it costs very little when purchased in big quantity. I've seen different kinds of food being sold at tournaments: muffins, sandwiches, cookies (like mini Ritz, mini Oreos, etc) and even chips. I've always been wondering what good junk foods do at sporting events, but then again, bad stuff are usually what people prefer.

    You're definitely going to bring your mobile shop there right? I guess the essentials like grips and strings should at least be there. You might make some money with your stringing services even!

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    I see a couple of people worrying about getting tired On tournaments in Belgium (for recreants) you play between 6 and 10 games to 2 winning sets and most people can handle that.

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    too right. Making it cheaper for one gender might potentially bring up issues that could be avoided otherwise One thing you could do is to make it cheaper for your club members to join.

    Have you allowed for the option of players without a partner to join? A partner around their skill level would be selected for them, and this would be subject to having someone needing a partner too of course.

    Last tourney I entered, this was the format:
    - entry dates closed 1 week prior.
    - A sheet of paper was stuck outside with the draws for the day shown. So everyone knew their first games, who they were playing, and the games after that too. Players were responsible for updating the sheet with the results
    - every match got 3 shuttles, 1 reasonable one for warm-up, and 2 good ones. They then bring it back after the match, so you can reuse them for warming up
    - there were at least 2 people dedicated to the draws and announcement of matches. Because the order of matches had been decided prior, as soon as a court became available, the next game was called. If the player is not available, you move on to the next match
    - there was an entry pack: bottle of water, vouchers for food at the cafe, muffin bars..
    - there was a cafe selling sandwiches, food, coffee
    - there was a mobile shop there too with some baddy products. You could always advertise a special only for that day of say 20% off any product bought on that day
    - everyone got a copy of the draw for the day
    - prizes were medals, and at the end of the day, there were lucky prize draws for grips, bags, and last of all, a baddy racquet.
    - we paid per event we went in
    - remember to include newsletters with info on your online store & your baddy club too

    As a personal opinion, having entries at the door is going to be a real nightmare. It leaves a lot of planning to the last minute as you have no idea how many entries you might get. Unless you limit the entries, but what if that quota does not get fulfilled. If something can go wrong, it probably will. Remember Murphy's Law

    I would suggest closing out the entries two days before so you have time to organise the draws. If this was someone's first experience with your club, last impression I'd want to leave is for it to be unkempt and disorganised? You want them to come back again to the next tourney you organise right

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    Quote Originally Posted by bkiat
    As a personal opinion, having entries at the door is going to be a real nightmare. It leaves a lot of planning to the last minute as you have no idea how many entries you might get. Unless you limit the entries, but what if that quota does not get fulfilled. If something can go wrong, it probably will. Remember Murphy's Law
    Totally agree, IMO at least set the closing out date to be a week before.
    Put up the draw at an appropiate place at least three days in advance and if possible I'd suggest to put it on a website too (do you have space on your online shop webpage to make place temporary? more shameless advertising ) People really want to know when they are to play the first game, and in my experience most find it nice to know the complete pool drawing in advance.

    Round-robin in pools of 4 is the way I prefer it, everyone is guaranteed a minimum of matches. IMO there is nothing more discouraging than being knocked out after one match, personally I avoid such tournaments.

    Holy crap, are you going to charge $15 CAN and include shuttles in that fee?
    In Sweden the regular entry fee for this kind of tournament is 150SEK , about $20 USD, and the players are expected to bring the shuttles (national tournament approved grade = equal/better than AS-30) themselves. Personally I find that system to work quite well, the organizers don't have to hustle with any shuttles (= no economic cost), but it's nice if you offer shuttles on sale.

    For prizes I agree, bags are good enough for the winners, vouchers for clothes (t-shirt/shorts) should work for the runner-ups, add 2-3 small prizes (grips, towels, shuttles etc) for draw in each category. No need to get any medals/trophies.

    I also support the idea of offering discount in your shop for the participants, good marketing I guess stringing will be a popular service many might need during/after the tournament

    Good luck!

    / mats

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