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  1. #55
    Regular Member jug8man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by taneepak
    The last cross string should be strung at a 10% higher tension. The reason is to compensate for the 'unseen' creep that tie-off knots are guilty of.
    Finishing the cross string with a tie-off knot at the top and at a lower tension becomes a double whammy. However, since you like it, who am I to comment?

    hmmm............
    confirmed Taneepak's stringing practices as to date:
    1) increase tension of first 4 centre mains (stringing mains from centre) to COMPENSATE.
    2) increase tension 10% higher (after the initial 10% increase for the crosses) to COMPENSATE.

  2. #56
    Regular Member DinkAlot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jug8man
    hmmm............
    confirmed Taneepak's stringing practices as to date:
    1) increase tension of first 4 centre mains (stringing mains from centre) to COMPENSATE.
    2) increase tension 10% higher (after the initial 10% increase for the crosses) to COMPENSATE.
    Hmmmm...

    1) Huh? You mean if 20lbs. main, go 22lbs for the first 4 mains then back to 20lbs.? But don't the strings even out in tension after some use?

    2) Huh? This one doesn't make sense. My guess: 22lbs. first four mains, then down to 20lbs. for the remaining mains, then back up to 22lbs. for the crosses and the final cross = 24lbs. to make up for the tension loss at the tie-off.

    Does that sound right?

  3. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by jug8man
    hmmm............
    confirmed Taneepak's stringing practices as to date:
    1) increase tension of first 4 centre mains (stringing mains from centre) to COMPENSATE.
    2) increase tension 10% higher (after the initial 10% increase for the crosses) to COMPENSATE.
    doesn't this turn out to be a guessing game? why 10%? why not 13, 15, or 17%(etc) for main and/or cross? What percentage is right for a particular machine? How can one be sure u end up with the exact tensions requested by the racket owner? Won't this deviation screw up the racket owners because if he goes to another stringer (beside taneepak/jug8man), he will sure get a different feel to his racket from other stringer. These changes prolly ok for newbie as they prolly can't tell the different but for better players, if he/she wanted 26x28 or 27x27, or whatever tensions, he/she want it exactly that, no screwing around by the stringer behind their back. What's the point buying an good or electronic machine that have increment of 0.25 lb when the stringer is playing around with +/-10%, 15% and 20% overall?
    Last edited by cooler; 10-06-2005 at 11:50 AM.

  4. #58
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    Did he say that?

    I thought he said to increase cross tension by 10% for the last cross string before tying off to compensate for loss of tension Yes? No?


    Quote Originally Posted by jug8man
    hmmm............
    confirmed Taneepak's stringing practices as to date:
    1) increase tension of first 4 centre mains (stringing mains from centre) to COMPENSATE.
    2) increase tension 10% higher (after the initial 10% increase for the crosses) to COMPENSATE.

  5. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete LSD
    Did he say that?

    I thought he said to increase cross tension by 10% for the last cross string before tying off to compensate for loss of tension Yes? No?
    i think jug8man had stated that going from left to right for the mains work better than starting from the center. Someone else had said he has to add a few lbs more to the mains when starting off from the center because he think the center feels 'lose' if he doesn't do that. What i've said is why buy a good precision machine when a stringer arbitrary add 10% more tension here and there just to patch up deficiency here and there. In the end, a racket owner asking for 24lbs tension might really be getting a 26.5 lbs racket back and thinking all that time he had a 24 lbs strung racket or why his '24 lbs' racket break so easy when the racket might be really seeing ~26.5 lbs.

  6. #60
    Regular Member DinkAlot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cooler
    i think jug8man had stated that going from left to right for the mains work better than starting from the center. Someone else had said he has to add a few lbs more to the mains when starting off from the center because he think the center feels 'lose' if he doesn't do that. What i've said is why buy a good precision machine when a stringer arbitrary add 10% more tension here and there just to patch up deficiency here and there. In the end, a racket owner asking for 24lbs tension might really be getting a 26.5 lbs racket back and thinking all that time he had a 24 lbs strung racket or why his '24 lbs' racket break so easy when the racket might be really seeing ~26.5 lbs.
    How can going from left to right or right to left be better than starting from the center for the mains? Going left to right is faster but I've seen many rackets warp/become mishaped at higher tensions because of this method.

    Also, going from the center won't feel loose if you double back and tighten the strings. I have to go play Bad right now, when I get back I'll draw something that shows how I do it. There would be no tension loss at all on the mains.

  7. #61
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    i was just rephrasing some points of others for peter. I'm not pro or against any method just as long as u know what ur going.

  8. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by S4MadMan
    Yes, I'm aware of the tension loss on the last string however, I have noticed, going lower on the last cross string up top, I reduce stress on the string and there is less change of breakage due to a mishit. When I used to string the last string 10% higher and did a mishit, the string was sure to pop. Does that make sense? I hope so.
    A racquet strung at very high tension will snap a string from one hard mishit at the top. A lower tensioned string can get away with it. The string that breaks from a mishit is a main string at the top which is above the first cross string. It breaks because it is in an area of 'you-are-on-your own' where the main strings have no support from the cross strings. A lower tensioned first cross string at the top doesn't help. It only helps if the crosses can fill up all the void at the top. You will notice that the void at the throat end is even larger, but it gets away because nobody hits it there. The top part is always more important than the lower part, the lower it goes the lesser it's role.
    If you don't want your strings to pop from mishits, you can either go for high tension + no mishits, or go lower tension and do what you want.

  9. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by taneepak
    The last cross string should be strung at a 10% higher tension. The reason is to compensate for the 'unseen' creep that tie-off knots are guilty of.
    Finishing the cross string with a tie-off knot at the top and at a lower tension becomes a double whammy. However, since you like it, who am I to comment?
    All I said is all of the above. I don't quite understand what Jug8man and Cooler are saying in response.

  10. #64
    Regular Member jug8man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jug8man
    hmmm............
    confirmed Taneepak's stringing practices as to date:
    2) increase tension 10% higher (after the initial 10% increase for the crosses) to COMPENSATE.
    Ahh sorry for the confusion on this 1 (#2)...
    should read
    Quote Originally Posted by Taneepak
    The last cross string should be strung at a 10% higher tension... to compensate
    even after the initial 10% increase from the start of the crosses.
    Last edited by jug8man; 10-07-2005 at 11:42 AM.

  11. #65
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    The 10% + 10% for the last cross works to a certain extent. For AT-800 and NS racquets, the extra 10% increase in tension for the last cross is not enough because the untensioned knot string has a longer distance.

    Here is another way that you might consider if you have lots of time. Try to attach a very thin but very strong string to the untensioned knot string, on the outside of the frame. Pull both cross string and thin string into and out of the knot grommet. Now tension the thin string. Next, tie the finishing knot on the cross string. This method should eliminate much of the tension loss.

    Quote Originally Posted by jug8man
    Ahh sorry for the confusion on this 1 (#2)...
    should read even after the initial 10% increase from the start of the crosses.
    Last edited by Pete LSD; 10-07-2005 at 01:14 PM.

  12. #66
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    I'm starting to get used to doing 2-piece bottom-up. I can complete the mains in about 15 minutes, including prestretching and measuring the string, which is about par with the pros at the WC whom I observed.

    But, I lose a lot of time on the crosses. Even when there's no snags, kinks, etc., it still takes me about 30 minutes to finish just the cross. And I can't figure out where I lose the extra 15 minutes compared to the pros. I've made sure I don't lose the end by keeping it between my lips; I weave one ahead, though may not be as quick as the pros. As much as I want to think so, I don't think the fact that I use a crank and they used an electronic make up for the additional 15 minutes. Primarily because a local long-time stringer I know can finish one using the same pattern on his old Ektelon glide-bar crank in about 30 minutes. And that's including dealing with snags and switching the glide-bars around.

    Is it just a matter of speed and efficiency of movement? Something that only improves with hundreds of completed frames?

  13. #67
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    Eh, the shared grommets substantially slow things down. Lots of shops use the awl for the speed reason .

    Quote Originally Posted by Quasimodo
    I'm starting to get used to doing 2-piece bottom-up. I can complete the mains in about 15 minutes, including prestretching and measuring the string, which is about par with the pros at the WC whom I observed.

    But, I lose a lot of time on the crosses. Even when there's no snags, kinks, etc., it still takes me about 30 minutes to finish just the cross. And I can't figure out where I lose the extra 15 minutes compared to the pros. I've made sure I don't lose the end by keeping it between my lips; I weave one ahead, though may not be as quick as the pros. As much as I want to think so, I don't think the fact that I use a crank and they used an electronic make up for the additional 15 minutes. Primarily because a local long-time stringer I know can finish one using the same pattern on his old Ektelon glide-bar crank in about 30 minutes. And that's including dealing with snags and switching the glide-bars around.

    Is it just a matter of speed and efficiency of movement? Something that only improves with hundreds of completed frames?

  14. #68
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    You can ask the pros to use a 6-point machine, without disabling the 4 side supports, and without using the awl. It will be interesting to find out how long it will take them.

  15. #69
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    OK, boys and girls. Here is the proper way to use dental floss. (for stringing, not for your teeth)

    1) Get a dental floss and a needle. (Guys, ak your wife or girl friend first or go out and buy one your self.)

    2) Thread the floss through the needle and tide a knot near the end.

    3) Insert the needle through the shared hole. (Be very careful, do not pierce the main with the needle.)

    4) Insert a short end of the string into the dental floss loop and pull the floss.

    5) Pull the floss through the hole and the string with it.

    Do not use regular sawing thread because they break after few uses.I will suggest bend the needle so it is a little bit curved. It will be easier to insert the needle through the shared hole.
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    Last edited by silentheart; 10-14-2005 at 12:26 AM.

  16. #70
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    No matter how careful you are, a sewing needle has a very sharp point, much sharper than even the sharpest awl, and you could knick the string and/or grommet. The dental floss will go through almost any shared grommet, irrespective of size, without any other aid except your hand. And it has no sharp points or edge to knick or bruise your string or grommet.

  17. #71
    Regular Member DinkAlot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by silentheart
    OK, boys and girls. Here is the proper way to use dental floss. (for stringing, not for your teeth)
    Thanks for the detailed info but isn't it easier to just pre-string the racket and avoid this? I pre-string the racket when I'm waiting for a court. It's so much easier.

  18. #72
    Regular Member DinkAlot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by taneepak
    No matter how careful you are, a sewing needle has a very sharp point, much sharper than even the sharpest awl, and you could knick the string and/or grommet. The dental floss will go through almost any shared grommet, irrespective of size, without any other aid except your hand. And it has no sharp points or edge to knick or bruise your string or grommet.
    Good points, definitely be very careful with a sewing needle. You can also dull the sewing needle point a bit.

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