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    Default Video analysis: Men's doubles amateur match.

    I am going to put up a couple of videos of a men's doubles.

    I would like some feedback on the weaknesses of the pair in orange T shirts. What do you think in terms of tactics if you were to play them?

    https://youtu.be/WuUbP22IakQ

    https://youtu.be/Fd6G3Q3jtm4

    There is a third video but it is still uploading.

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    They are a good pair with no glaring weaknesses. They move well, especially in the rearcourt. Serve, smash, drop, and net are good.

    Players of this quality are not going to make too many unforced errors. If you sit back and defend then you're going to get flattened, which is exactly what happened in the game.

    At the beginning, their opponents were trying to apply pressure, and this is where you see a few mistakes at the net. The orange pair are very consistent when they are allowed to control the rallies, but when time is taken away from them they fumble some shots.

    But their opponents also made some mistakes, and I think they gave up and decided to play it "safe" -- i.e. don't give away points from unforced errors. I think this was a mistake, because it made life way too easy for the orange pair.

    I still think the orange pair would have won regardless of tactics, but their opponents could have put up more of a fight.

    So the general idea would be to apply more pressure, even though you will make some mistakes yourself. In particular I think they should use more drop shots and midcourt pushes. The orange pair like playing a "smash net" type of game, and they like a moderate-fast pace. They do not like changes of paces or shot variation. Their footwork is very good around the rearcourt but sometimes a bit clunky around the midcourt (relatively speaking).

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    @Gollum ,

    An analysis to silence all others! LOL

    This is the third video.




    I have some other matches to put up. Certainly, it's a good exercise.
    Last edited by Cheung; 06-22-2015 at 01:57 PM.

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    What a transformation! The underdogs played amazingly well there. They completely changed their tactics, and often looked in control of the rallies.

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    In case anybody is wondering, this is from Hong Kong. There are various divisions of the annual championships. Notably, there seems to be more spectators here than in the early rounds of this year's US Open (from what I saw from a picture on facebook).

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    @Gollum ,

    This one may interest you.

    Another match from the same day. 1st game and second game. The players wearing yellow are not so strong - probably the weakest out of the four pairs seen in this thread. What do you see are the weaknesses of the pair who wear white and the red/black T shirt?




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    One thing to note is that they all rarely take advantage of the smash or drop down the middle between the two opponent players. And when they sometimes do, they often win a point.

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    Yes. For some reason, it's rarer to see here. Maybe people do so much practice on half court they forget it as an option.

    The orange T shirt pair will meet the white top and red/black top pair in the next match. It will be interesting to see if the Orange pair can be overcome. What do you think?

    I don't know about Canada or UK but it's very common for competitors to record matches for analysis in HK at amateur levels.

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    I'm not even sure the black and white pair can get double digit points games from the orange pair...

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    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    I'm not even sure the black and white pair can get double digit points games from the orange pair...
    That bad ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gollum View Post

    I still think the orange pair would have won regardless of tactics, but their opponents could have put up more of a fight.

    So the general idea would be to apply more pressure, even though you will make some mistakes yourself. In particular I think they should use more drop shots and midcourt pushes. The orange pair like playing a "smash net" type of game, and they like a moderate-fast pace. They do not like changes of paces or shot variation. Their footwork is very good around the rearcourt but sometimes a bit clunky around the midcourt (relatively speaking).

    Exactly what came to my mind...!
    Though, I fear that the other team is just too weak in netplay and midcourt play to apply some pressure and control the pace of the game there.


    Quote Originally Posted by Gollum View Post
    What a transformation! The underdogs played amazingly well there. They completely changed their tactics, and often looked in control of the rallies.
    I don't agree with that.
    The orange team is at what? 3rd gear out of 6? 70% effort?


    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    I'm not even sure the black and white pair can get double digit points games from the orange pair...
    If the orange team goes all out, it's going to be single digit games. They are on another level than the second match you posted.

    I would like to see the orange team being in a real fight and under pressure in their weaker areas (which is probably when it comes to soft shots, change of pace and net game). But this will def not happen against the black/white team...

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    The black/white are another solid pair. It's difficult to see their weaknesses because their opponents are really not good enough to expose them. They cover each other well.

    The black-shirt guy is sharp around the net and applies a lot of pressure from this area. He also reads his opponents well and anticipates weak shots to the net. I think they are strongest when he is at the net. They are a good all-round pair, but the white-shirt guy is not as comfortable at the net, and I think he hits a bit harder at the back.

    The most obvious weakness is the white-shirt guy serving. His serve is a bit inconsistent, and often it goes too high. With stronger opponents, this will be punished more. Maybe he should take more time getting ready to serve.

    If I were playing them, I would want to take the net away from the black-shirt guy. The best way to do this is to take the net for myself whenever I can.

    The next way is to play the shuttle away from the net more, by playing fewer soft blocks and pushing the shuttle a little deeper (past the service line). To do this, you must be ready to play a flat game.

    The last way is simply to attack directly and overwhelm them, so they never get a chance to use their own attack. This is what the orange pair will try to do most.

    When challenging the orange team, black/white must avoid lifting unless absolutely necessary, as orange are too good in the rearcourt and will beat down their defences. Black/white must take control of the net, as that is their strongest area. This will not be easy, but they must challenge orange for the net or they have no chance.

    They must also exploit orange's lack of agility, using drop shots and pushes/blocks to make them twist and turn. Also use half smashes and sliced smashes to upset orange's defensive rhythm. Orange are very mobile attacking in the rearcourt, but they are less good moving side-to-side in the midcourt and forecourt. Also orange are quite static in defence, and this makes them vulnerable to the softer smashes that fall in front of them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cheung View Post
    I don't know about Canada or UK but it's very common for competitors to record matches for analysis in HK at amateur levels.
    I'm a bit off topic here, so I'll be quick.
    It's not common at all to record competitors as far as I'm concerned in the UK. However it does seem like a good idea, especially in the UK as in most tournaments you go to, you see the same people each time as there aren't a huge amount of people to choose from.

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    A very comprehensive analysis by Gollum.

    The orange pair are much more experienced. They have been part of HK squad in the past. I agree it's harder to spot specific weaknesses in both these matches shown as there is at least a two level difference between the opposing pairs.

    Going back to the videoing in UK, it should be OK to do so in adults competitions as these are open to public and no minors. It's just not seen very often though we can see on YouTube, many do put their own games up.

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    I guess, that the men in black with the grey hair is @Cheung .

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    Quote Originally Posted by ucantseeme View Post
    I guess, that the men in black with the grey hair is @Cheung .
    Don't know. I never spoke to him. Good try there.

    He looks to be the sharpest guy around the fore and mid court area out of all the players.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cheung View Post
    Don't know. I never spoke to him. Good try there.

    He looks to be the sharpest guy around the fore and mid court area out of all the players.
    I only noticed that he wear Forza Gear and you reviewed their products for BC. I guess that Forza isn't famous in HK, so I came to this conclusion that this guy might be you.

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