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  1. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by weeyet
    A big NO!!! Malaysia can have import players in any other sports except BADMINTON.

    I still don't see any Malaysians feel proud from heart when Yuan Yufang (athlete) won the 1998 Commonwealth gold medal.

    What about Me Lingjing (for pingpong)?
    malaysia takes serious pride when it comes to badminton. and nowadays, our jr girls r really coming up. y, they even reched the finals of the Asian Junior Championship by defeating Korea!

    And i agree abt the yuan yufang comment... i guess we r just too proud to take in outside players. malaysia boleh mah..

  2. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by fishnet wen*yi
    malaysia takes serious pride when it comes to badminton. and nowadays, our jr girls r really coming up. y, they even reched the finals of the Asian Junior Championship by defeating Korea!

    And i agree abt the yuan yufang comment... i guess we r just too proud to take in outside players. malaysia boleh mah..
    Actually, I feel that badminton is the only sports that unite Malaysian people. It is a sign of unity for Malaysian people. You will see every Malaysian-Chinese cheering behind Hafiz Hashim or Roslin or Rashid Sidek when playing against any China's player. And all Malay here supporting Wong Choong Hann when playing with Taufik Hidayat. I will be the first to oppose the suggestion to import badminton player (whether male or female)!!!

  3. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by kienkeatlover
    THIS HAS BEEN A HOT TOPIC HERE WHEN WC HAD FINISHED. ONE OF THE REPORTER ASKED WHETHER SHOULD OR SHOULD NOT WE IMPORT OTHER FOREIGN PLAYER. I QUICKLY SAID NO, BUT TO THINK DEEP ABOUT IT..I DOUBT. MAYBE WE SHOULD? BUT ITS 'BAM' MATTERS AND I JUST CAN SAY..JUST WAIT AND SEE. THINK POSITIVE.
    Maybe Malaysia will get more encouraging results in international scene by importing players, but which would you feel more proud: Mia Audina won a Olympic gold medal for Malaysia in Beijing or Wong Mew Choo won a bronze medal of World Championship for Malaysia in Spain??

    Haha, I will certainly prefer the latter.

  4. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by twdc08
    is it Lydia Cheah 170++cm???WMC just 165cm....
    if Lydia CLY is about 170cm....mayb she`s the tallest female badminton player in malaysia...is it right???
    Lydia is 174 or 175cm. I asked her during MSSM in Perlis this year.She has not been playing much tournament lately. Havent heard anything about her. She is not choosen for the SEA Games.

  5. #39
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    this pic is of wong mew choo and julia wong quite sum time ago... i hav a pic of lydia too but in another thread... junior players thread i think...
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by fishnet wen*yi; 11-12-2005 at 03:56 AM.

  6. #40
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    that's not w.mew choo...

    its how chiou hwee(sp...)

  7. #41
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    Why Malaysia cannot produce good women players?

    It's simple.

    In Malaysia, Malay is the majority race (66%), Chinese (23%), Indian (9%) and the rest (2%).
    Malay all are muslim, and in Malaysia muslim girls cannot wear short pants/shirt at anytime. So how are they going to play in sports? Can you wear long pants, long gown & scraf playing badminton?
    How are you going to expect If just depends on the 23% of chinese and the others race?

  8. #42
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    There was a thread earlier about the women badminton players from Iran, and how they have to be fully covered while playing badminton. It's too bad Muslim women aren't encouraged to play sports... i think that's why there's such a big skill gap between the men and women players in Indonesia and Malaysia.
    G

  9. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by alloh
    It's simple.

    In Malaysia, Malay is the majority race (66%), Chinese (23%), Indian (9%) and the rest (2%).
    Malay all are muslim, and in Malaysia muslim girls cannot wear short pants/shirt at anytime. So how are they going to play in sports? Can you wear long pants, long gown & scraf playing badminton?
    A good system can still make the difference. Let's see. If that limitation is inflexible, that still leaves 34% of Malaysia's total population (estimated at 24 million) the female members of which are not necessarily religiously or culturally bound to remain clothed so modestly as to prevent a career in professional sport. 34% of 24 million is still over 8 million. The women's team of Denmark - a country with a total population of 5 million - remains competitive with every nation but China. Denmark is definitely the exception to the rule, but so is Malaysia. The next smallest badminton power, by population, is Korea with twice Malaysia's population. Despite having twice as many men to choose champions from, Korea is never a hands-down favourite over Malaysia in men's competitions. Nor is Indonesia despite having 8 times as many men. The challenge in remaining competitive may be greater when it comes to the relatively even smaller talent pool for Malaysian women, but it is not insurmountable. That is why so many other people posting to this thread have looked at the reasons for hope for the future of the Malaysian women's team and at the variables that can and should change in order for the women to succeed. I'm sure it will take money and effort and will on the part of Malaysia's badminton community.

  10. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by verve_pipe
    that's not w.mew choo...

    its how chiou hwee(sp...)
    really? haha.. no wonder she looks so diff the star newspaper captioned her as wong mew choo... then again, they mix up a lot of photos b4.

  11. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by alloh
    Why Malaysia cannot produce good women players?

    It's simple.

    In Malaysia, Malay is the majority race (66%), Chinese (23%), Indian (9%) and the rest (2%).
    Malay all are muslim, and in Malaysia muslim girls cannot wear short pants/shirt at anytime. So how are they going to play in sports? Can you wear long pants, long gown & scraf playing badminton?
    How are you going to expect If just depends on the 23% of chinese and the others race?
    I think some Muslim families in Malaysia are less conservative. In some sports such as bowling, the most celebrated women bowler is Shalin, a Malay sportswoman who's met with great success at home and abroad.

    And I might also add that in predominantly Muslim Indonesia, the girls are not doing too badly in international badminton although relative to their male counterpart's performance, they are miles apart.

    But I guess it has also to do with the general picture that fewer women participate in sports than men worldwide. Women have a more limited 'active' sporting career in the sense that they have to think of starting a family earlier and having to raise children.
    Last edited by Loh; 11-14-2005 at 04:55 AM.

  12. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loh
    I think some Muslim families in Malaysia are less conservative. In some sports such as bowling, the most celebrated women bowler is Shalin, a Malay sportswoman who's met with great success at home and abroad.

    And I might also add that in predominantly Muslim Indonesia, the girls are not doing too badly in international badminton although relative to their male counterpart's performance, they are miles apart.

    But I guess it has also to do with the general picture that fewer women participate in sports than men worldwide. Women have a more limited 'active' sporting career in the sense that they have to think of starting a family earlier and having to raise children.
    Bowling is a game, not a sport. If we're talking over-protective parents keeping their daughters from a life of competition and the public eye, that's one thing, but when the activity doesn't involve wearing shorts or anything else that would violate a strict dress code, that isn't the same as badminton. But maybe you're right about the existence of less conservative families. Was the Sidek sister who was on the national team Muslim?

    As for Indonesia, it's a huge country and something like 20% of the country isn't Muslim so even if that influence was as strong as Alloh suggests, you're still looking at a talent pool in Indonesia of 40 million (20 million women). That's almost as many non-Muslim girls as Uber Cup runner-up Korea has. Many of the women that I see representing Indonesia seem to be Christian or otherwise non-Muslim: Susi Susanti, Lilyana. Ratnasari and Yulianti has Catholic-sounding names. And none of this proves that there is an actual exclusion. Finding a true champion is so random at the best of times. And so many kids are excluded from the talent pool by reason of geography or economics or preferences for other sports or other activities.

    Loh makes a good point, too, that this particular reason is just a slightly more visible one among the numerous obstacles to women's participation in sport. Look at the difference in prize money at some competitions or look at how long it took for women's professional sports leagues to take off in a huge market like the U.S. I remember a marathon in Korea here one year where the prize money for first place was US$70,000 for the top man and US$5000 for the top woman. As justification for these types of prize money decisions one often hears that women don't draw as many spectators or that they don't beat as many competitors. These have a chicken-or-egg ring to them because you can reason that you only draw more competitors by offering more prize money. These rationalizations are vaguely similar to decisions described here by organizations like BAM not to bank on women competitors.

  13. #47
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default "Sport" or "Game"

    [QUOTE=event] Bowling is a game, not a sport.

    Was the Sidek sister who was on the national team Muslim?
    [QUOTE]

    A very interesting definition you have brought up on bowling as a game and NOT a sport. I remember I once tried to differentiate between these two words and found difficulty trying to compartmentalize all the sporting or athletic activities into either one or the other.

    But most would agree for example that 'swimming' is a sport, so are 'shooting', 'gymnastics', 'diving', 'dancing', 'sailing', and 'athletics'. I agree with you that bowling seems more appropriately defined as a game, though.

    Then also, why are badminton, tennis, table-tennis, basketball, soccer, hockey, water-polo, baseball, netball, golf, chess known as games. Is it for historical reasons?

    But what exactly is the true meaning of sport and game? Though both are somewhat related, yet they are not really the same. How do we differentiate the two? So could you shed some light?

    As defined by my Concise Oxford Dictionary:

    Sport:

    1. An activity involving physical exertion and skill in which an individual or team competes against another or others for entertainment.

    Game:

    1. An activity engaged in for amusement.
    2. A form of competitive activity or sport played according to rules.


    As for whether Sidek's sister is a Muslim, I would think so as a child from Muslim parents is a Muslim by birth. I think the religion also requires a non-Muslim married to a Muslim to be converted to a Muslim. Maybe someone can enlighten better.

  14. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loh
    A very interesting definition you have brought up on bowling as a game and NOT a sport. I remember I once tried to differentiate between these two words and found difficulty trying to compartmentalize all the sporting or athletic activities into either one or the other. Then also, why are badminton, tennis, table-tennis, basketball, soccer, hockey, water-polo, baseball, netball, golf, chess known as games. Is it for historical reasons?

    But what exactly is the true meaning of sport and game? Though both are somewhat related, yet they are not really the same. How do we differentiate the two? So could you shed some light?.
    So you noticed my little pot-shot, did you? I wasn't sure anyone would. I didn't actually produce a definition to justify my rejection of bowling's sport status but, as a matter of fact, I do have my own facetious definition. I like to say that it's only a sport if the sweating is caused only by the weather or your clothes. In other words, pool, golf, bowling, darts, archery, curling and shooting are definitely out. Baseball only achieves sport status for a few players at select moments that are few and far between. The sweating a golfer does is the same as I do when I walk to the store to buy juice and that's not a sport. If you stood around in polyester pants and leather shoes watching one tall guy scratch himself and spit tobacco for 3 hours on a summer's afternoon, you'd sweat just as much as the average baseball player does. In other words, I'm being rather nit-picking about the definition of "physical exertion" referenced in the definitions you quoted. In other words, I'm just messing around and you're better off with those dictionary definitions.

    As for game, the idea of keeping score makes that a category of which part of the activities involved with many sports are a subset. Hence the need for terms like "game, set,..." in our sister sport of tennis. Some sports, like badminton, deal with games while others, like cycling or diving, do not.

    As for Zamaliah Sidek, I thought she might qualify as an exception to Alloh's rule but was unwilling to jump to conclusions about her religion. Although I admit the conclusion might have been pretty obvious, there are people who change their beliefs and I wasn't about to make assumptions about someone I know nothing about.
    Last edited by event; 11-17-2005 at 09:16 AM.

  15. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by event
    So you noticed my little pot-shot, did you? I wasn't sure anyone would. I didn't actually produce a definition to justify my rejection of bowling's sport status but, as a matter of fact, I do have my own facetious definition. I like to say that it's only a sport if the sweating is caused only by the weather or your clothes. In other words, pool, golf, bowling, darts, archery, curling and shooting are definitely out. Baseball only achieves sport status for a few players at select moments that are few and far between. The sweating a golfer does is the same as I do when I walk to the store to buy juice and that's not a sport. If you stood around in polyester pants and leather shoes watching one tall guy scratch himself and spit tobacco for 3 hours on a summer's afternoon, you'd sweat just as much as the average baseball player does. In other words, I'm being rather nit-picking about the definition of "physical exertion" referenced in the definitions you quoted. In other words, I'm just messing around and you're better off with those dictionary definitions.

    As for game, the idea of keeping score makes that a category of which part of the activities involved with many sports are a subset. Hence the need for terms like "game, set,..." in our sister sport of tennis. Some sports, like badminton, deal with games while others, like cycling or diving, do not.

    As for Zamaliah Sidek, I thought she might qualify as an exception to Alloh's rule but was unwilling to jump to conclusions about her religion. Although I admit the conclusion might have been pretty obvious, there are people who change their beliefs and I wasn't about to make assumptions about someone I know nothing about.
    according to islam law.. zamaliah sidek may burn in hell because she expose her aurat!!!

  16. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by alanSS
    according to islam law.. zamaliah sidek may burn in hell because she expose her aurat!!!
    alanSS could you stop saying so stupid things? you really want to get banned???

  17. #51
    Administrator kwun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by seven
    alanSS could you stop saying so stupid things? you really want to get banned???
    banned. got tired of deleting his immature posts.

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