User Tag List

Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 LastLast
Results 18 to 34 of 114
  1. #18
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    113
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I love the jump smash, I use it all the time and have been told I create very good angles(a few umpires have said it and its my best attribute). I am 16 years old and I am in the england cells and I find the jump smash second nature now. At first it was very difficult to do but when I got older and stronger it became very easy. It takes alot of leg strengthening to do it so a lot of training needed. The best example I found was this one:
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  2. #19
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Malaysia
    Posts
    253
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Arrow jumpsmash

    i like jumpsmash too...i always use my toe to do jumpsmash.....for me,,,i think to success in jumpsmash, we have to skip a lot and do a lot of footwork plus frog jump...

  3. #20
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    101
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Jump Smash!!!

    I like the looks of the knee thing. But i oppose it, cuz when u land, wouldn't it make u less balanced. This would make it hard for u to return your next shot.

  4. #21
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    650
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tranvi007
    I like the looks of the knee thing. But i oppose it, cuz when u land, wouldn't it make u less balanced. This would make it hard for u to return your next shot.
    I just wanted to Mention how important the arms/shoulders are in gaining extra power in your jump

    try this experiment


    a) hold your raquet behind your head in your normal (pre-swing) position - execute a variety of jump smashes this way (3-5)

    b) hold your raquet below your waist and swing both your arms up and (your raquet arm behind your head) as you jump and swing try it (3-5 times)

    *in other words use the upwards swinging of your arms in an attempt to gain more height*

    - see if you feel the difference between a) and b)
    which one felt higher/more powerful ?


    if you watch vollyball players they will swing thier arms down before they swing them up....the sway of the arms/and shoulders goes up with the jump

  5. #22
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    maple ridge canada
    Posts
    117
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wedgewenis
    I just wanted to Mention how important the arms/shoulders are in gaining extra power in your jump

    try this experiment

    a) hold your raquet behind your head in your normal (pre-swing) position - execute a variety of jump smashes this way (3-5)

    b) hold your raquet below your waist and swing both your arms up and (your raquet arm behind your head) as you jump and swing try it (3-5 times)

    *in other words use the upwards swinging of your arms in an attempt to gain more height*

    - see if you feel the difference between a) and b)
    which one felt higher/more powerful ?


    if you watch vollyball players they will swing thier arms down before they swing them up....the sway of the arms/and shoulders goes up with the jump
    i thought v ball players did that to gain height on their vertical?

  6. #23
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Badminton court
    Posts
    164
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Post

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Beckman
    I love the jump smash, I use it all the time and have been told I create very good angles(a few umpires have said it and its my best attribute). I am 16 years old and I am in the england cells and I find the jump smash second nature now. At first it was very difficult to do but when I got older and stronger it became very easy. It takes alot of leg strengthening to do it so a lot of training needed. The best example I found was this one:
    Is that you on the picture???

  7. #24
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Near Toronto
    Posts
    511
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by paulchow
    i thought v ball players did that to gain height on their vertical?
    Yes, we do do that to gain height, but it helps the swing a bit. However, I find that I lean back far more when I hit in volleyball than when I jump smash in badminton. In badminton, I think it is more important to cock your shoulders when you hit because it creates a harder snap.

    I also know that when you snap your knees in volleyball, the ball has a lovely forespin when hit. I think in badminton, this would definately help the speed of the birdie as it does in volleyball.

  8. #25
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Richmond, BC. Canada
    Posts
    363
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I am learning how to do a jump shot. Our club is using the mavis 300 shuttlecock. Does it matter a lot if I learn jumpshot using the m300? My guess is that the difference isn't much once you know how to do a jumpshot. What is your experience tell you about not using a feather shuttlecock? When you first learnt how to do jumpshot, did you start to count (ie. 1sec, 2sec, etc) when the shuttlecock dropped to the point where you should initiate your jumpshot? Thanks.

  9. #26
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Manila
    Posts
    42
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    An Indonesian friend of mine once told me that a lot of players from my country play "flat" meaning they are so into strong smashes/returns that they tend to neglect placing and angles. "Flat" because the direction of their returns go right in front of them.

    A jump smash/plain smash is a very powerfull tool but pros use it plainly for the kill. If you have a good opponent who knows how tiring a jumpsmash can be, there's a good chance he'll keep giving you clears knowing he can return your smash and use up all your energy. Try it at home. Try doing the jumpsmash (even without your racquet). After a few of those, you'll notice how tiring it can be.

    Badminton is not all about the power of your smash. It's more about positioning your shots correctly to force your opponent to give away a shot for you to kill.

    (Thanks Coach Roy!)

  10. #27
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Taipei & Los Angeles
    Posts
    259
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I am one of those whose main attributes is attacking and smashing, i started the pursuit of jump smashing about half a year ago after i realized i needed an upgrade to my smash. this thread gave some helpful advice, gonna try it out this weekend and see if the kicking out of the leg thing is really my missing source for some power. after an injury to my arm recently i've got to try getting my smash feeling back. thanks for the tips

  11. #28
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Taipei & Los Angeles
    Posts
    259
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    btw i think peter rasmussens jump smash is excellent he's my main inspiration to pursuit this

  12. #29
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Singapore...Garden City
    Posts
    136
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Sigit Budiarto !!!
    When he jump he got the height... and i really mean high one heehee....and his junp smash is also very powerful and deep...

  13. #30
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    77
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mag
    (I think that's what I suggested, no?)
    In any case, just because the Danes are tall doesn't mean they wouldn't benefit from high jumps... OK, Gade has a fair enough jump smash but the doubles players seem less eager to do it. Hmmm... the more I think about it, the more convinced I get that it's because their recovery time is longer, considering their build.
    You can't make a jumpsmash on every shuttle which comes to you. And in double the 'trend' is flat-flying shuttels which aren't perfect for a smash. I don't think tall people have a longer recovery time, but a perfect jump-smash is extremly excorsting your body and might not be worth it.
    Truely you don't see danes jumping around the court just as much as the asiens, but if you look at the smashes you'll se that they often are long (almost down the back-line) and crosses the opponent in the hip-to-shoulder height, which is the most hard place to do a prober return of the shuttle.
    My own experience tells me that a flat agressive smash are costing more damages for the opponents 'cause its a harder to return a just as agressive return.

    --
    Christoffer

  14. #31
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    1,611
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by christoffer
    You can't make a jumpsmash on every shuttle which comes to you. And in double the 'trend' is flat-flying shuttels which aren't perfect for a smash. I don't think tall people have a longer recovery time, but a perfect jump-smash is extremly excorsting your body and might not be worth it.
    Truely you don't see danes jumping around the court just as much as the asiens, but if you look at the smashes you'll se that they often are long (almost down the back-line) and crosses the opponent in the hip-to-shoulder height, which is the most hard place to do a prober return of the shuttle.
    My own experience tells me that a flat agressive smash are costing more damages for the opponents 'cause its a harder to return a just as agressive return.

    --
    Christoffer
    I don't agree that the so call "flat agressive smash" is more effective than the high angle smash. Which they can be returned as a drive, a counter-attack, quite easily, and you will lose the aggression. Sorry if I am wrong.

  15. #32
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    77
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wong8Egg
    I don't agree that the so call "flat agressive smash" is more effective than the high angle smash. Which they can be returned as a drive, a counter-attack, quite easily, and you will lose the aggression. Sorry if I am wrong.
    The high angle smash is only good when the opponents has opened a spot on the court, other wise you just keep smashing over and over again.

    I might not have made it clear, but the idea with a flat smash is to hit at chest-shoulder height on the body, which very often gives i semi-hard return which you just "put in the ground"

  16. #33
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    London area, UK
    Posts
    3,926
    Mentioned
    8 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by christoffer
    The high angle smash is only good when the opponents has opened a spot on the court, other wise you just keep smashing over and over again.

    I might not have made it clear, but the idea with a flat smash is to hit at chest-shoulder height on the body, which very often gives i semi-hard return which you just "put in the ground"
    It depends. Against opponents who are well-positioned, with good posture, smashes to the body may not be effective. Better players will be able to drive back a flat smash. That's why pros mostly use steep smashes - it makes counter attack more difficult for the defenders.

    On the other hand, players who defend too far forward, or with upright posture, are vulnerable to flatter smashes - because they are not protecting their body.

  17. #34
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Burnaby, BC, Canada
    Posts
    3,511
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    The perfect condition for a steep angled smash in doubles would be a setup lift in the midcourt. A straight smash to the floor between the two opponents would be close to unreturnable. Any weak returns would be put away by the front player. One shouldn't be absolute when it comes to tactics as different shots works better in different situations and different opponents. Flat and steep smash have their own use. Personally, I find that body shots work better when opponents are still on the move. eg. backing into defense. Effective steep smash is more of a placement shot than power shot to 'overwhelm' your opponents.

Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Jump Smash -Block Jump
    By staiger in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 13
    : 06-23-2011, 05:37 AM
  2. Perfect Jump While Smashin"
    By khan09 in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 3
    : 03-24-2009, 01:33 PM
  3. Racquet for the perfect Smash?
    By Dwarfcichlid78 in forum Racket Recommendation / Comparison
    Replies: 11
    : 01-28-2009, 12:18 PM
  4. Analysis of the Perfect Smash!
    By aheron147 in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 16
    : 02-14-2008, 12:06 PM
  5. how to smash perfect
    By jin in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 7
    : 03-11-2002, 12:16 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •