User Tag List

Page 11 of 20 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 LastLast
Results 171 to 187 of 340
  1. #171
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    6,527
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    It is simpler than you think. In doubles think like in singles when you are serving or receiving. If the score is 2-0 in your opponents' favour and they have the right to serve, having just won a rally point, they then serve to you or your partner from their even court-just like in singles. If you and your partner wins this rally point, the score is now 1-2 and you or your partner will then serve from the odd court-again exactly like in singles. It is a mirror image of the singles scoring system. The old system pigeon-holes each player with an odd or an even tag and uses only the even side for each side's first serve-a rather illogical and complicated system.
    Let me ask you, is it simpler to score a singles or a doubles game under the old system? The old system's singles scoring system is worlds apart from its doubles scoring system, not unlike using both the double serve in tennis and the single serve in table tennis to score badminton singles and doubles. What other games have one serve for singles and two serves for doubles? It is too much rojak. The new system sort of unifies them, a sort of grand unifying universal law.

  2. #172
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    319
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by taneepak
    It is simpler than you think. In doubles think like in singles when you are serving or receiving. If the score is 2-0 in your opponents' favour and they have the right to serve, having just won a rally point, they then serve to you or your partner from their even court-just like in singles. If you and your partner wins this rally point, the score is now 1-2 and you or your partner will then serve from the odd court-again exactly like in singles. It is a mirror image of the singles scoring system. The old system pigeon-holes each player with an odd or an even tag and uses only the even side for each side's first serve-a rather illogical and complicated system.
    Let me ask you, is it simpler to score a singles or a doubles game under the old system? The old system's singles scoring system is worlds apart from its doubles scoring system, not unlike using both the double serve in tennis and the single serve in table tennis to score badminton singles and doubles. What other games have one serve for singles and two serves for doubles? It is too much rojak. The new system sort of unifies them, a sort of grand unifying universal law.
    I don't need it to be simpler. I made the point that the old system actually helps you remember the score.

    I also said that you were wrong when you said that the serves are even for a pair since there is a strong possibility that one player will not serve at all.

    It never ceases to amaze me how you manage to ignore points made by other posters and plug on with your own message. You are definitely either a member of the IBF or some other politician.

  3. #173
    Regular Member DinkAlot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    dcbadminton.net
    Posts
    12,280
    Mentioned
    11 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CWB001
    You are definitely either a member of the IBF or some other politician.

    Naw, Eepak is just the Badminton Central Hero of Heroes!

  4. #174
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    6,527
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    CWB001, hope you now know how cunningly simple the new scoring system is. When scoring think like in singles but play like your usual doubles. The two doubles serves are now gone and are being replaced by just one serve-just like in singles. Now, what is good for singles is equally good for doubles. No more mixed-ups like who is odd or who is even. Odd or even doesn't follow the player anymore. It follows the side that serves, just like in singles.

  5. #175
    Regular Member ants's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Malaysian Citizen of the World
    Posts
    13,157
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    All i read about this New Scoring Format is mostly negative. Any positive side of this new scoring method?
    As human we have to adapt to changes. Without changes we might never improve. Of course not all changes can be the best solutions, but hey if things don't change, we might never learn from it.

    As a famous quote says. If we do the same thing day in day out and expect different results that is called insanity.

  6. #176
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    6,527
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CWB001
    .

    Of course, under the old system the doubles serving system actually aids the players in remembering the score. How often have you seen or taken part in a discussion to resolve the score which involved remembering which side you served from? That won't be reliable any more.
    Yes, under the old system you need to remember who is odd and who even. The new system is even simpler. It requires no such memory aid or tagging. When it is your side's turn to serve, you simply follow the singles way of serving. What can be simpler than that? The only problem is when you claim the score is 4-3 in your favour when the facts say 3-3, and you insists on serving from the even court. But this is not system fault.

  7. #177
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    327
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default How to tell which court should I stand for the next

    Quote Originally Posted by taneepak
    The two doubles serves are now gone and are being replaced by just one serve-just like in singles.
    Sorry, bit slow on this new scoring system. Singles no issue for me.

    but for doubles, what are the things that we need to know in order to determine on which court should I stand (left/right) after the rally for the next serve (provided I know I start the game from which court)?

    From the old scoring system, we can tell from the score and where you start the game from.

    Thanks.

  8. #178
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Hobart, Australia
    Posts
    408
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Does the player who just serve in doubles swap sides with his partner after winning a point on his serve or does his partner serve next without exchanging sides?

  9. #179
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    6,527
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    There are two points to observe in doubles. The only time you change courts with your partner is when you win a rally point when your side is serving. You stay put where you are, even if you win a rally point when your opponents are serving. You get to serve when you win a rally point and you serve from either left or right court as in singles, i.e. right court on even no. and left court on odd no.

  10. #180
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lymm, United Kingdom
    Posts
    1,287
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    hmmm.. apparently Kenneth Jonassen has been on danish telly and openly criticised the new scoring system. He believes it allows no opportunity for big comebacks.

    .. heard this somewhere before anybody?

  11. #181
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    63
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Question

    Quote Originally Posted by taneepak
    There are two points to observe in doubles. The only time you change courts with your partner is when you win a rally point when your side is serving. You stay put where you are, even if you win a rally point when your opponents are serving. You get to serve when you win a rally point and you serve from either left or right court as in singles, i.e. right court on even no. and left court on odd no.
    Yes, it is pretty easy to tell *where* you serve from. How does one figure out *who* serves? That is to say, how does one tell, simply looking at the score halfway through the game, whether the person who started the game by serving at 0-0 should be in the right--half-court or the left--half-court?

  12. #182
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lymm, United Kingdom
    Posts
    1,287
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kanive
    Yes, it is pretty easy to tell *where* you serve from. How does one figure out *who* serves? That is to say, how does one tell, simply looking at the score halfway through the game, whether the person who started the game by serving at 0-0 should be in the right--half-court or the left--half-court?
    i have to agree here - i'd be interested to know how umpires keep track of who should stand where, there should be an easy way to figure out where the players should stand based solely on the score and which side served first in the match..

    Coops

  13. #183
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Basement Boiler Room
    Posts
    22,118
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Valuable experience for shuttlers with new system

    BY RAJES PAUL

    PETALING JAYA: Malaysia’s challenge in the invitational World Cup Badminton Championships in China ended but the shuttlers gained valuable experience playing matches adopting the experimental 21-point rally scoring system.

    Singles shuttler Mohd Hafiz Hashim and the veteran doubles pair of Choong Tan Fook-Lee Wan Wah returned home yesterday after failing to make the semi-finals in the revived world tournament.

    Hafiz played in Group B and he lost to Chinese opponents – All-England champion Chen Hong (21-18, 19-21, 13-21) and world junior champion Chen Jin (17-21, 16-21).

    Tan Fook-Wan Wah won one of the three matches in Group A– beating China's Sang Yang-Zheng Bo 21-14, 21-19. They lost to Indonesian veterans Candra Wijaya-Sigit Budiarto (17-21, 17-21) and another Chinese pair, Fu Haifeng-Cai Yun (21-13, 14-21, 22-24).

    The 31-year-old Wan Wah said that they struggling to adapt to the new format of scoring.

    “It was quite confusing in the beginning. The format is not difficult. We just lack practice because we left for China immediately after the SEA Games (in Manila),” said Wan Wah.

    “Every mistake costs us a point and we have to be alert at all times.”

    He felt that the format did not give any advantage to players with certain style of play.

    “It's a touch-and-go situations with all the players having a chance to win. The rallies are fewer in a match and the pace is much faster.”

    He added that they should have beaten Haifeng-Cai Yun.

    “In the rubber game, we were tied 20-20. The first pair to score two consecutive points win the match. At that moment, we forgot that the service does not change hands. We were confused and lost the match.”

    The World Cup was the first international tournament to experiment with the format.

    Officially, the IBF will use all their world ranking meets from Feb 1 to test the format, beginning with the Thomas-Uber Cup qualifying round in Jaipur, India, from Feb 13-19.

    Most of the matches in the World Cup took between 30-45 minutes.

    The shortest match of 23 minutes was between Candra-Sigit and Tan Fook-Wan Wah. The longest was 56 minutes between the Chinese women’s doubles pairs of Wei Yili-Zhang Yawen and Zhang Dan-Zhao Tingting (22-20, 16-21, 21-18).





    SEMI-FINALS

    Men’s singles: Lin Dan (Chn) bt Chen Hong (Chn) 21-14, 6-21, 21-6; Boonsak Ponsana (Tha) bt Shon Seung-mo (Kor) 23-21, 21-15.

    Men’s doubles: Candra Wijaya-Sigit Budiarto (Ina) bt Tony Gunawan-Howard Bach (Usa) 21-18, 21-9; Fu Haifeng-Cai Yun (Chn) bt Jens Eriksen-Martin Lundgaard Hansen (Den) 21-14, 21-12.

    Women’s singles: Zhang Ning (Chn) w.o. Yao Jie; Xie Xingfang (Chn) bt Lu Lan (Chn) 21-11, 21-19.

    Women’s doubles: Wei Yili-Zhang Yawen (Chn) bt Kim Min-jung-Ha Jung-eun (Kor) 21-11, 21-13; Yang Wei-Zhang Jiewen (Chn) bt Zhang Dan-Zhao Tingting (Chn) 15-21, 21-9, 21-10.

    Mixed doubles: Xie Zhongbo-Zhang Yawen (Chn) bt Sudket Prapakamol-Saralee Thungthongkam (Tha) 21-12, 21-19; Nova Widianto-Lilyana Natsir (Ina) bt Jens Eriksen-Mette Scholdager (Den) 21-15, 21-18.

    FINALS

    Men's singles: Lin Dan (Chn) bt Boonsak Ponsana (Tha) 21-14, 21-9.

    Men's doubles: Fu Haifeng-Cai Yun (Chn) bt Candra Wijaya-Sigit Budiarto (Ina) 21-11, 21-18.

    Women's singles: Xie Xingfang (Chn) bt Zhang Ning (Chn) 21-19, 21-16.

    Women's doubles: Yang Wei-Zhang Jiewen (Chn) bt Wei Yili-Zhang Yawen (Chn) 21-18, 21-15.

    Mixed doubles: Xie Zhongbo-Zhang Yawen (Chn) bt Nova Widianto-Lilyana Natsir (Ina) 21-19, 21-9.

  14. #184
    Regular Member ants's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Malaysian Citizen of the World
    Posts
    13,157
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    even if Li Yongbo say he doesnt like the new scoring format , its all sweep by the chinese team in this year's world cup .

  15. #185
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Basement Boiler Room
    Posts
    22,118
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Badminton-New rules experiment fails to derail dominant China
    Monday December 19, 9:14 PM



    BEIJING, Dec 19 (Reuters) - Radical rule changes in badminton have done little to loosen China's grip on the sport as local players swept the first international competition to use the experimental new system in Yiyan at the weekend.
    Even after notching victories in all five events at the Saiqi Invitational World Cup, however, the Chinese had very little good to say about the changes in scoring.

    Under the new system under trial, points are no longer awarded just to the server and games are played best of three up to 21 points rather than 15 points as before (11 in women's singles).

    "The 21 point game is not as nice to watch as the 15 point game because both sides emphasise attack, leading to fewer rallies," said world number one Lin Dan after his 21-13 21-11 win over Thailand's Boonsak Ponsana in the men's final on Sunday in the central Chinese city.

    "Before, you could use wiping away your sweat or getting a drink as a break to pull yourself together, but under the rules, there are no rests until after 11 points, it's not too good," he was quoted as saying by the news website www.sina.com.

    Supporters of the changes say the new scoring system will speed up the game and give it more flow, making it more attractive to television and live audiences.

    China's head coach Li Yongbo said he supported reforming badminton to revive flagging interest, but thought the scoring changes were rash.

    "I have expressed criticism to the International Badminton Federation, mostly that some of their decisions were too slapdash, they were not based on enough research," Li was quoted as saying by the China Sports Daily.

    But China's powerful mixed doubles pairing of Xie Zhongbo and Zhang Yawen said the rules played to their advantage in their 21-19 21-10 win over Nova Widianto and Lilyana Natsir of Indonesia, which avenged their loss to the Indonesians in the final of August's world championships.

    "We feel comfortable playing this new rally point system," Zhang was quoted as saying by on the International Badminton Federation's website.

    "I'm short but fast and he (Xie) is tall and great at attack. I think it's this combination that helped us succeed."

    A final decision on whether to permanently implement the rule changes will be made in May.

  16. #186
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Cannock, UK
    Posts
    2,908
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by coops241180
    i have to agree here - i'd be interested to know how umpires keep track of who should stand where, there should be an easy way to figure out where the players should stand based solely on the score and which side served first in the match..

    Coops
    I don't know what the new rules are, but the simplest thing to do would be to have an odd and even person like you do now.
    At the start of every rally, you stand on the side that matches your score.
    You may have to change sides without serving though, because you can score points without serving.

    e.g. Start of match, Team A server serves into the net. serve changes hands, score becomes 1-0. Team B now have serve and swap sides because they now have 1.
    Team B serve and win a point. 2-0. A stay where they are, B swap sides.
    Team B serve and lose a point. 1-2. B stay where they are, A swap sides.

    a point is scored every rally, so one side or the other changes sides from their previous position every rally. At the start of every rally you take up position according to your score and whether you are odd or even.

    It's only confusing at the moment because people are not used to changing sides when they lose a rally.

  17. #187
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lymm, United Kingdom
    Posts
    1,287
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Neil Nicholls
    I don't know what the new rules are, but the simplest thing to do would be to have an odd and even person like you do now.
    At the start of every rally, you stand on the side that matches your score.
    You may have to change sides without serving though, because you can score points without serving.

    e.g. Start of match, Team A server serves into the net. serve changes hands, score becomes 1-0. Team B now have serve and swap sides because they now have 1.
    Team B serve and win a point. 2-0. A stay where they are, B swap sides.
    Team B serve and lose a point. 1-2. B stay where they are, A swap sides.

    a point is scored every rally, so one side or the other changes sides from their previous position every rally. At the start of every rally you take up position according to your score and whether you are odd or even.

    It's only confusing at the moment because people are not used to changing sides when they lose a rally.
    thats not how it works tho according to the rules - you only swap sides if your serving and you score a point, thats what makes it soooo confusing..

Page 11 of 20 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. New scoring format for Thomas Cup
    By ants in forum Thomas Cup / Uber Cup 2006
    Replies: 40
    : 02-16-2006, 07:28 PM
  2. New Scoring Format for Doubles
    By Kamen in forum General Forum
    Replies: 45
    : 12-29-2005, 03:11 AM
  3. 5*7 scoring format
    By komodo dragon in forum Thomas Laybourn Forum
    Replies: 2
    : 10-04-2003, 11:33 AM
  4. Scoring format to be reverted back to traditional format
    By Winex West Can in forum General Forum
    Replies: 1
    : 03-23-2003, 04:45 PM
  5. New Scoring Format
    By CJ in forum General Forum
    Replies: 22
    : 02-28-2001, 09:00 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •