User Tag List

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 18 to 28 of 28
  1. #18
    Regular Member DinkAlot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    dcbadminton.net
    Posts
    12,205
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by s1nn3r
    China has such a well set up system for retire players, no wonder parents sending their young children for tough training. What amaze me is that they also take care of their not well known player, this is really a very good system.

    NO more Sleeping Dragon.

    I don't know about the system but if retired players don't like the system, they leave and many come to the U.S. and become professional coaches and do well.

  2. #19
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    OC,CA,USA
    Posts
    393
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kwun
    this is actually a very good point. the size of population doesn't do much good if there is no system in place. in China, there are very organized provincial teams, as well as organized sports school. we have read many stories of how China's great badminton players first gets their foot in the local sports school, and then when their talent shows, they get to move on to the provincial capital sports school, and then later on to the provincial team, and eventually get picked by the national team coaches.

    and then after they do get to the national team, there is the top facility that ctjcad mentioned. not only the facility, but the fact that players have their living expenses (lodging, food, utilities) all taken care of so they don't need to worry about making ends meet. as well as the best and experienced coaches (many of them). so all the players need to worry about is badminton, badminton, and badminton.

    without such a national-wide system in place, there can be another billion ppl in the country and it probably won't make a difference.

    contrast that to the US. every kid enroll in normal schools. while some do have badminton as extra-curricular activity, the quality of coaches are limited. and then beyond that, there is very little to support the potentially talented kid aside from parents paying outside coaches out of their own pocket. and then there is a big disconnect from there to the national level.

    China's system isn't easy to implement, however, it is a national system which requires a lot of funding from the top level. certainly the government must have the vision in order for this to happen.
    This is well said ...... That is why i dont see any light soon at the end of the tunnel for USA Badminton as a Olympics sports or for the players as well. ...
    Who would want to go full time as a badminton player if there is no financial security in the future for them. And for the scenario now, even if we have some talented players who would give up their life for badminton, can they really afford it due to the high training cost plus other cost associated with it like travelling for tournaments, tournament Entry fees etc etc ??

  3. #20
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Basement Boiler Room
    Posts
    22,118
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by harimau
    This is well said ...... That is why i dont see any light soon at the end of the tunnel for USA Badminton as a Olympics sports or for the players as well. ...
    Who would want to go full time as a badminton player if there is no financial security in the future for them. And for the scenario now, even if we have some talented players who would give up their life for badminton, can they really afford it due to the high training cost plus other cost associated with it like travelling for tournaments, tournament Entry fees etc etc ??
    then ur wearing foggy glasses
    things can change.
    China and india will become so economically strong, u have to like badminton WHETHER U LIKE IT OR NOT LOL

  4. #21
    Regular Member DinkAlot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    dcbadminton.net
    Posts
    12,205
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cooler
    China and india will become so economically strong, u have to like badminton WHETHER U LIKE IT OR NOT LOL
    LOL! So funny but true. ...

  5. #22
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Basement Boiler Room
    Posts
    22,118
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Chinese language catching on in U.S. classrooms

    Monday, January 2, 2006 Posted: 1817 GMT (0217 HKT)

    PORTLAND, Oregon (AP) -- Twenty-four young faces in the kindergarten class at Woodstock Elementary School watch intently as their teacher holds up a construction paper cut-out of a large red circle, and waits for them to identify the shape.

    Piece of cake for a roomful of savvy 5-year-olds, except that teacher Shin Yen is looking for the shape's name in Mandarin Chinese. It's the world's most widely-spoken language, but one that's only just beginning to surface in U.S. classrooms, especially at the elementary level.

    "Yuan", her students chant, without missing a beat.

    A triangle comes next, and they call out, "San-Jiao." Then a square -- "Zheng-fangxing" -- and so on down the line.

    The Woodstock class is on the front lines of a U.S. government-backed effort to get more students learning Mandarin, a nod to China's emergence as a global superpower of the unfolding century.

    So far, the number of students nationwide who take Mandarin is minuscule -- about 24,000, most of them in high school. That compares with the 3 million or so who study Spanish, the most popular language in the nation's schools, with French and German next.

    But a number of urban school districts have launched Mandarin programs, including Chicago, Philadelphia, Houston and Boston.

    High schools across the country were asked by The College Board's world language initiative whether they'd consider adding Advanced Placement courses in Italian, Russian, Japanese and Chinese -- and the organization was amazed at the results, said Tom Matts, initiative director.

    Fifty schools in the 2003 survey said they'd offer the Russian option, about 175 said Japanese and 240 Italian.

    "And for Chinese, it was 2,400, 10 times the number of any of the other three," Matts said. "We had no idea there was such an incredible interest out there. Of all the new AP courses, certainly Chinese shows the most promise for growth."


    Cecilia Welsh, 6, and Zoe Arnault-Hull, 6, right, play during a Mandarin song in their kindergarten class.In the U.S. Senate, the Foreign Relations Committee is considering a proposal to allocate $1.3 billion to boost Chinese language and culture classes in public school, and China, too, is doing its part, said Michael Levine, education director at The Asia Society in New York City. China's education ministry has formed partnerships with states including Kentucky and Kansas, as well as the countries of Brazil, Australia and the United Kingdom, to boost teacher exchanges and training.

    The Oregon program, though, is the first in the country to track students from kindergarten to college. The school district and the University of Oregon won a $700,000 grant from the Defense Department for the program this fall.

    The idea is for students to move from the Portland school system to the university, where scholarships will be offered to students who will take a standard college curriculum taught largely in Chinese. Students can also opt to spend their junior year abroad, studying at Nanjing University in China.

    The goal, organizers say, is for the program to be a model that other schools and universities can duplicate, and for students to emerge ready for the workforce, with a native fluency in Chinese.

    Eight years ago, when the Woodstock program began, the majority of students were of Asian descent, Woodstock principal Mary Patterson said, many of them adopted daughters whose parents wanted them to feel some kind of connection to their native country. Now the program is increasingly mixed ethnically, she said; for the first time this year, the program had a waiting list, and interested parents had to be turned away.

    It's long been accepted that the younger a child is, the easier it is to introduce them to a second language, said Patterson.

    In September, most of Yen's 24 students couldn't speak a single word of Mandarin, one of the most difficult languages to learn. But three months later, the students were singing songs in Mandarin, laboriously printing Chinese characters and following Yen's instructions, delivered in Mandarin, with no need for any English translation, jumping up to impersonate trees, mountains and frogs at her command.

    Teaching begins slowly, Yen said, with repetition of about 20 to 25 Chinese characters, since Mandarin has no alphabet, just 3,500 base characters that are then combined to form other words. Each year, students learn about 150 characters, she said, via constant repetition and memorization.

    "I am the only one in my family who really speaks it. I have to figure it out by myself."
    -- Lily Rappaport, 9-year-old learning MandarinBy the time they get to fourth grade, students are relatively fluent; Lily Rappaport, 9, said she sometimes dreams in Mandarin, after five years in the program. Being in the program has its disadvantages, she said; her parents can't be much help with her homework, for one.

    "I am the only one in my family who really speaks it," she said. "I have to figure it out by myself."

    In the higher grade levels, students at Woodstock take not just language-learning classes but also math and science courses that are taught in Mandarin.

    In Jessica Bucknam's fourth-grade math class, students answer her questions on graphing and remainders in easy, practiced Chinese. She mixes in some language learning with the math as well, asking students whether a wrong answer needs a smiley face or a frown next to it and waiting for their answer in Chinese.

    Yen and Bucknam are both native Mandarin speakers, but finding teachers for the program is among the greatest challenges, Patterson said.

    Where to find the teachers to meet the increasing demand for Chinese classes is the "$64,000 question," said Levine, of the Asia Society.

    Education officials should try for more teacher exchanges with China, he said, and consider alternative certification programs for some of the many Chinese speakers who live in the United States but are not licensed as teachers. Distance learning could also help bring Chinese language courses to students in more rural school districts, he said, and teacher preparation programs at universities could also ramp up efforts to train language educators.

    "There are great big multiples of kids who are studying the European languages, but when we think about our economy, and the new markets we are expanding into, it is time to recalibrate some of our attention," Levine said.

    Copyright 2006 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
    ----------------------------------

    cooler's crystal ball

    chinese food yesterday
    mandarin today
    badminton tomorrow

  6. #23
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    N.A.
    Posts
    202
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Having 1.2 billion to choose from is definitely an advantage... and they seem to kick people off, like using height requirements and stuff... have you noticed how the Chinese team is all TALLLLLL. Its seriously not normal for such a high percentage of Chinese people to be that tall. Around here its certainly not like that.. and didn't Pi and those other women leave China to go elsewhere cause of the height thing? Kind of brutal if you ask me, but hey, it works.

  7. #24
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Philippines
    Posts
    90
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    i think they dominates badminton world bcoz they are well-trained since they are 10-12 yrs old..

  8. #25
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Malaysia
    Posts
    921
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    parents in Malaysia would rather want their kids to study well and have a promising job for their life... there's only a few of them would want thier children to choose badminton as a career... They are being materialistic n children hardly to do watever they like

  9. #26
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    931
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I think another huge factor is that they've got the top players constantly practising with each other, trying to best each other's already top-world-class games.

  10. #27
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    843
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hara^kazuko
    parents in Malaysia would rather want their kids to study well and have a promising job for their life... there's only a few of them would want thier children to choose badminton as a career... They are being materialistic n children hardly to do watever they like
    Would you choose to let your kids become a badminton player and train extremely hard since they are 5 years old if you are a parent?

  11. #28
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Malaysia
    Posts
    921
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EastDevil
    Would you choose to let your kids become a badminton player and train extremely hard since they are 5 years old if you are a parent?
    Nope... and that's why it is a factor.... we don't need to become a badminton player for a better life compare to China

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Similar Threads

  1. The "U", the "G" and the "tension" specifications of a Badminton racket
    By chris-ccc in forum Badminton Rackets / Equipment
    Replies: 85
    : 07-07-2014, 05:54 AM
  2. victor brave sword 09 "made in taiwan"? "made in china"???
    By ggman8988 in forum Badminton Rackets / Equipment
    Replies: 1
    : 08-31-2010, 08:10 PM
  3. "Jiangsu" China Badminton Team sponsered by Yonex
    By Deathsticks in forum China Professional Players
    Replies: 9
    : 10-16-2009, 10:41 AM
  4. 2007 "China Mobile Cup"Badminton Invitational Championships video.
    By george@chongwei in forum Badminton Tournament Video Sharing
    Replies: 8
    : 11-22-2007, 04:50 PM
  5. Merge "Badminton Humor" with "Chit Chat"
    By bigredlemon in forum Forum Feedback
    Replies: 3
    : 03-31-2003, 02:04 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •