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Thread: badminton diet?

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    Default badminton diet?

    ey, can anyone here share thier diet plan here which includes the supplements tat u take too.

    i recently bought an protein powder supplement by 21st century and its actually for muscle builders and rapid weight gain and its contains 750 calories per serving. its does increase energy and endurance, at least tats it says on the label. i don noe whether i should take it.

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    I don't think supplements are a good thing. I try to eat lots of protein. In the evening after training if I feel hungry and can't find anything in the fridge I make a milkshake with banana, milk and raw egg. (Oh salmonella I hear them cry... still not a stomach pain after 7 years of raw egg shakes..)

    You never know what you're putting in your body when you take supplements. And I swear to a huge portion of lasagne 48 hours before a tournament. (garfield would agree...)

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    Protein powder brands always market themselves on the most likely poeple to by their brand- people who want to build muscle fast. Don't be fooled by this as all athletes including professional and semi pro badminton players use it as means of increasing their protein in their diet. It will help you become stronger in your training, decrease your recovery time after sessions and fix muscular injuries quicker. If you do not go to the gym you will not put any weight on at all!!!

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    Protein is for building structures in your body. If you are not going to grow anymore-and most adults are in this category-your protein needs are minimal and are required only to replace cells in your body that are being constantly replaced. Adults do not and cannot use protein to grow from a 2' child to a six-footer. If adults consume too much protein they will accumulate toxic waste.
    It is carbohydrates that sportsmen need. Carbohydrate loading helps before a tournament. I think Peter Gade does a little of carbohydrate loading. Only carbohydrates can give you energy on demand. Protein cannot give you energy.
    In addition to carbohydrates, the best beverage you can have is a large mug of cocoa plus skim milk drink. Cocoa will help your cells make more nitric acid and will make them take in more oxygen. The Argentina World Cup soccer team goes through this big mug of cocoa drink ritual every morning.
    As a matter of fact I have started a drink cocoa movement in Hong Kong and Malaysia with sportsmen and sportswomen, specifically for mountain hikers, golfers, badminton players, sedentary people who get tired running after a bus, etc. So far the movement is growing very fast. I just returned from Malaysia with 8kg of alkalized low fat cocoa powder.

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    I agree with taneepak although protein can actually give you energy through a process called gluceneogenesis where amino acids get converted to glucose when there are insufficient carbohydrates in the diet.

    But generally speaking, 60/20/20 carbs/protein/fat as a percentage of calories is a good rule of thumb for atheletes (bodybuilders likely need more protein).

    More important than ratio's in my opinion is to make sure that the carbs and fats are healthy ones (whole grains, vegetables, unsaturated fats)

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    would u consider coke as carbohydrate?

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    Normally protein is not converted to carbs. If it does then you are literally 'eating' your own body, like prisoners of war of Changi prison during the Japanese occupation. Or like the muslim Bosnians a decade or so ago.

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    Before training everyday I make sure to eat at least 3 hours and one hour before beginning training. This is just what I am accustomed to. I eat something with protein 3 hours before and a banana or toast with peanut butter or spinach salad one hour before. I also take Centrum as I have high iron requirements (not sure why). Within 30-45 minutes after training for 2-4 hours I take a protein shake. Then eat whatever after training b/c I am super hungry. 75% of the time after training I eat healthy... occasionally I just binge.

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    If you are over 19 years of age you will be well advised to not overload yourself with too much protein, because your protein requirement is minute-only about 36g for every 100lbs of your body weight. A piece of lean meat weighing only 125g is more than enough protein for a day, assuming that your weight is 150lbs and that piece of meat is 45g protein, 45g fat, and 35g water, etc. A 3 year old kid will need almost 3 times the protein of an adult, on a per body weight basis.

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    Actually extra protein is gonna be wasted if inadequate energy consumption. The extra protein will be used for producing energy instead of tissues.

    I agree with some that carbs is important but be cautious with "carbo loading'. Carbs hold water and certainly one does not want to carry all that extra water weight when runnign around in the badminton court. Therefore, the recommendation is to go easy on the carbo loading by spreading them out 1-2 weeks before tournment and not days prior.

    In addition, players should constantly replenish the carbs in muscles during a match via sports drink or carb rich foods (banana). Carbs in muscle can be exhausted pretty fast during the first 15-20 minutes of a game cos of the high intensity nature of the sport.

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    thanks everyone for ur replies, now i have an idea to make my own diet plan.

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    It all depends on your body make up, in my case I take in a lot more protien than the average person. I tend to drink protien shakes more in the summer as the heat diminishes my appetite.

    I'm, on average, 30 - 40 pounds heavier than the typcial badminton player who is the same height. I've got a lot of muscle mass and thus I need lots of protien to keep the muscles from breaking down.

    I lift weight 5-6 times a week on top of cardio ( running, badminton, squash)


    When I'm trying to lean down, like I am now, I tend to cut out a lot of the sweets and greasy foods ( not that I eat a lot of fast food anymore). I also lean more towards fruits and pasta for energy.

    For example, breakfast will be one of the following:

    1) a Banana with Peanut Butter
    2) Yogurt with two slices of toast
    3) Bowl of Cereal ( though rarely anymore as I found the milk causes mucus build up)


    Mid-morning Snack:
    Apple Sauce/Fruit Cup and a granola bar


    Lunch
    Apple/Grapes and Fruit Leather
    The odd day I'll pack a deli meat sandwich (Turkey, Smoked Chicken).

    Dinner:
    Various Combinations of:
    Pasta, Chicken, Salad, Vegetables. BBQ steak. Sushi. Soup, Vietnamese Subs. I'd east more fish, but none of my kids like it. Most fast food is along the lines of Quiznos and Subway.


    I like to stay away from Potatoes (especially french fries) and cut down on the sugared pop. My biggest vice is Fruit Juice which has mega calories. I'm drinking some diet pop, and still like gatorade, but trying mostly to stick to water and V8. I have vowed to eat more veggies ( hence the reason I drink V8)

    Very little junk food, though if I get a craving I allow myself to have it. (The odd donut).


    Keep it simple, more smaller meals...

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    ViningWolff... what is Fruit Leather??? Something Canadian? Sounds interesting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ViningWolff
    It all depends on your body make up, in my case I take in a lot more protien than the average person. I tend to drink protien shakes more in the summer as the heat diminishes my appetite.

    I'm, on average, 30 - 40 pounds heavier than the typcial badminton player who is the same height. I've got a lot of muscle mass and thus I need lots of protien to keep the muscles from breaking down.
    Whatever your weight or muscle mass your protein requirement is still a puny 36g per 100lbs of your bodyweight. Having more muscles just means that you have more water and less fat in your body and hence will weigh heavier, which is taken care of by the 36g protein requirement per 100lbs of your body weight.
    If you take too much protein far in excess of the 36g per 100lbs of body weight, and if your protein comes in the form of meat, meat, meat and nothing else, you are going to get into serious trouble later in life.
    A protein molecule is like a string of beads, and each bead is an amino acid. When meat protein is digested, these beads come apart and pass into your blood, making it slightly acidic. The human body is finicky about how acidic the blood gets because even a tiny change in acid levels can derange body chemistry. In the process of neutralizing that acidity, calcium is pulled from your bones, and passes out in the urine. The more protein you consume the more amino acids pour into your bloodstream and the more calcium you lose.
    Over time the once powerful and muscular body will have weakened bones, if protein is consumed in excess.

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    That's why I also have increased calcium intake to go along with it. I also take an anti-oxident.

    That 36 grams/100 lb ratio applies to a person of average fitness on a maintain only basis. if I stuck to that, I'd wither away. In fact I'd start breaking down. I know this from experience.

    Given my weight is around the 210 lb mark and I train twice a day most days, my intake in minimum of 150 grams a day. I if don't take that in, I feel it. Then again, I'm not in maintain mode, I'm in increase mode.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ViningWolff
    That's why I also have increased calcium intake to go along with it. I also take an anti-oxident.

    That 36 grams/100 lb ratio applies to a person of average fitness on a maintain only basis. if I stuck to that, I'd wither away. In fact I'd start breaking down. I know this from experience.

    Given my weight is around the 210 lb mark and I train twice a day most days, my intake in minimum of 150 grams a day. I if don't take that in, I feel it. Then again, I'm not in maintain mode, I'm in increase mode.
    A thing about calcium which may surprise you : A group of Yale University researchers looked at hip fracture rates in sixteen countries. Because osteoporosis is particularly aggressive in women after menopause, they focused on women over fifty. They expected to find that countries with a higher calcium intake would have fewer fractures. But that was not what they found at all. To their surprise, just the opposite was true. Countries with greater calcium consumption actually had more hip fractures, not fewer.
    Calcium was not causing the fractures. The countries with a high calcium intake happened to be those where Western diets-meat and dairy products-were popular. When the researchers looked at how much meat these populations ate and their incidence on hip fractures, they found their culprit. The more meat people ate, the more fractures they had. The problem was apparently something in the meat, and the high calcium intake was not able to stop the fractures. Meat protein makes your blood chemistry acidic, which in turn pulls calcium from your bones at a faster rate than your calcium intake.
    The 1992 Yale research paper was titled 'Cross-cultural association between dietary animal protein and hip fracture: a hypothesis. Calcified Tissue International.' The authors were Abelow, B.J., T.R. Holford, and K.L. Insogna

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    WARNING: Association is not causation

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