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Thread: changing form

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    Default changing form

    When i first started playing I played with the wrong form and im trying to change it to a good form. How can i change it to a beter form? People sya i play too stiff.

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    Well just to say this, the longer you played with bad form, the harder it will be to fix that form.

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    Get coaching.............i know it can be $$$ but it is worth it......once you have the good form going it usually stays with you

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    bad form or good form comes naturally. it is natural for players sometimes that they are in bad form.

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    Quote Originally Posted by K3vin
    Well just to say this, the longer you played with bad form, the harder it will be to fix that form.
    I know that a lot of people say this, but is it really true?

    Of course, the more you practice doing something a certain way, the more you "groove" in that motion so that you end up doing it automatically without having to think about it. Suppose that you have an inefficient movement pattern 'grooved in' so you keep repeating this poor technique. Once made aware of how this can be improved, can it really be said that you're at a disadvantage compared to a beginner at that particular movement? I'd say that the motor control ability, hand-eye coordination, sports specific strength and kinesthetic awareness developed even using poor technique would be of great benefit.

    When optimizing your technique from "inefficient" to "more effective" form (I don't like to think in terms of good/bad), there may be a brief sensation of strangeness as you first start the movement, but with good motor control and awareness one should soon begin to "feel" how a particular change can benefit the stroke, such as better power, improved stability, faster recovery, more precise control, etc. If not, then perhaps that particular change isn't yet necessary as a more fundamental part of the movement needs tweaking.

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    Quote Originally Posted by stumblingfeet
    I know that a lot of people say this, but is it really true?

    Of course, the more you practice doing something a certain way, the more you "groove" in that motion so that you end up doing it automatically without having to think about it. Suppose that you have an inefficient movement pattern 'grooved in' so you keep repeating this poor technique. Once made aware of how this can be improved, can it really be said that you're at a disadvantage compared to a beginner at that particular movement? I'd say that the motor control ability, hand-eye coordination, sports specific strength and kinesthetic awareness developed even using poor technique would be of great benefit.

    When optimizing your technique from "inefficient" to "more effective" form (I don't like to think in terms of good/bad), there may be a brief sensation of strangeness as you first start the movement, but with good motor control and awareness one should soon begin to "feel" how a particular change can benefit the stroke, such as better power, improved stability, faster recovery, more precise control, etc. If not, then perhaps that particular change isn't yet necessary as a more fundamental part of the movement needs tweaking.
    I agree with Kevin. With what he said absolutely.

    I know alot of player who have bad form/ technique............most have never got coaching and turn their nose up at it......like they are too good to be coached.

    Sure you can make up for this lack of form in other areas..........but if your foundation is weak, all your hard work to improve other things.....................really is a waste of time if you want to be good.

    Why? Because if you improved your form first.........and then worked on the other aspects............you will be far more accomplished player.

    Any player I play.............has had extensive coaching at some time in their life or is still getting coached.

    Put it this way: What professional players are there that have bad form but are able to make it up in all the other areas............none are naturals they have all been coached.........for years prior to becoming an elite player.

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