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  1. #52
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    What if I am a mix of, say, grade 3 and 4? What does that make me? I know I suck at this game, I like to play in a standard indoor badminton court(but it is expensive so I play most of my badminton games at outdoor badminton courts) and i watch badminton matches occasionally(I do not have cable television to watch those channels that show sports all day). What can I say? I am a beginner!

  2. #53
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    I should be somewhere around 5 or 6 , skill of sub 0 , but a heart of 8+.

  3. #54
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    I don't believe what you do truly affects your skill level.

    Think themselves are pretty good and like to show off.
    That isn't always the case with beginners.

    But maybe I'm a beginner, even though I'm not showing off intentionally, I do challenging shots. Doesn't sound right however.

    Know that the string can be re-stretched.
    you mean restring..i suppose?

    Personally..I feel that my skill level would be at 6. However, i'm not terribly interested in videos..I was about a year ago. Now....pff...I'll come out with my own ideas.

    Personally, I think behaviour does not contribute to skill level. It's not like I'll get better by watching lots of video..this is a sport; we're not studying for writing an exam!

  4. #55
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    I agree with alzgodemort and think the grades 1-3 should be combined. There is a lower level of difference with beginner players.

    Whereas the last higher levels need more of a variance. There is a world of difference between someone who has all their shots, and someone who can hang with a pro, even at the lowest level. You need more degrees of difference in between grades 5-9.

    Also your grading seems dependent on playing conditions, equipment, knowing professional badminton players and information, etc. All of these are exterior factors. I would grade on more badminton factors based on skills. For example, a beginner might not use a correct forehand or backhand grip, and use strictly panhandle for all shots, with no consistency or length in their shots. Someone a step up might be able to do full clears, etc. Someone another step up might be able to do full backhand clears, etc. Just some suggestions.

    I would propose a grading something like this:

    grade 0= first timer
    grade 1,2,3 low, mid, high beginner
    grade 4,5,6 low, mid, high intermediate
    grade 7,8,9 low, mid, high advance

    Each grade would have skills attached to them, and moving into grade 5 and up, the player would start adding mental skills as well.

  5. #56
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    I agree. I would further add:

    grade 0= first timer - practice making contact with the bird
    grade 1,2,3 low, mid, high beginner - learning to make consistent clears, and practicing footwork
    grade 4,5,6 low, mid, high intermediate - good serves, can do clears, smashes, drops with reasonable consistency, footwork improved
    grade 7,8,9 low, mid, high advance - strategy, consistent shots, with some particularly effective shots, efficient footwork.
    grade 10 - beyond advanced - top players who make it to at least to the finals in local tourneys some of the time.

    Quote Originally Posted by prophet
    I agree with alzgodemort and think the grades 1-3 should be combined. There is a lower level of difference with beginner players.

    Whereas the last higher levels need more of a variance. There is a world of difference between someone who has all their shots, and someone who can hang with a pro, even at the lowest level. You need more degrees of difference in between grades 5-9.

    Also your grading seems dependent on playing conditions, equipment, knowing professional badminton players and information, etc. All of these are exterior factors. I would grade on more badminton factors based on skills. For example, a beginner might not use a correct forehand or backhand grip, and use strictly panhandle for all shots, with no consistency or length in their shots. Someone a step up might be able to do full clears, etc. Someone another step up might be able to do full backhand clears, etc. Just some suggestions.

    I would propose a grading something like this:

    grade 0= first timer
    grade 1,2,3 low, mid, high beginner
    grade 4,5,6 low, mid, high intermediate
    grade 7,8,9 low, mid, high advance

    Each grade would have skills attached to them, and moving into grade 5 and up, the player would start adding mental skills as well.

  6. #57
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    I think that guide was supposed to be humorous.

  7. #58
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    I think the ranking can serve as an alternate view of the standard for amateur players. it could be humorous but it also points out some true behaviours that different standards of players may have.

    of course I agree that using the skill level should be the best and ultimate way to grade a player, but it is difficult to judge what is "...good serves, can do clears, smashes, drops..." if the test is conducted by a questionnaire like this.

    anyway, thanks for your comments. just for fun.

  8. #59
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    Default How to rate urself?

    then i guess im intermediate....gunna be advanced soon.
    Last edited by Furqan; 07-08-2004 at 02:56 PM.

  9. #60
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    By the way, my club has a tournament lately and there is level E ??? Is A,B,C,D official IBF ratings ?

  10. #61
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    I have a theoretical question..

    Should a player be rated at best or at worst?

    Typically, my best plays are at the middle of a session, because I would have warmed up, and yet haven't completely tired out. And it is at this point that, if I were to be playing against better players, I can hold my own, whereas before and after, I would not fare so well.

    Suppose that I have played for 2.5 hours continuously and am tired out; then someone says, I'm playing at the wrong level and wants to test me..what can I say?

    Ideally, I'd be playing great the whole time, but it's not something that will happen because of the way the club runs, and I don't really want to get into it.

  11. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheGr8Two
    I have a theoretical question..

    Should a player be rated at best or at worst?

    Typically, my best plays are at the middle of a session, because I would have warmed up, and yet haven't completely tired out. And it is at this point that, if I were to be playing against better players, I can hold my own, whereas before and after, I would not fare so well.

    Suppose that I have played for 2.5 hours continuously and am tired out; then someone says, I'm playing at the wrong level and wants to test me..what can I say?

    Ideally, I'd be playing great the whole time, but it's not something that will happen because of the way the club runs, and I don't really want to get into it.
    what you stated is the same problem with nearly all tournaments. for instance, if the draw happens to be poorly drawn, you may wind up playing the "best" players against each other in the quarters or semis. having won the hard set of matches, you can't recover in time for the finals - and the weaker team beats you in the finals - well, after all that hard work, this weaker team get the title...

    i guess in the case of the club situation - decline the match if you are too tired. i think your answer can be - "if this is a test, then test me at the beginning of the session when i am fresh, since that will be more indicative of my level."

  12. #63
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    Default In Quebec...

    In Quebec, we have 4 levels after the junior levels: Elite, A, B or C. When you suscribe for a tournament, you choose a level. I am a B-player. So, I can try to do the B, A or Elite tournament. I wouldn't be allowed to play in the C-level.

    When the season ends, the provincial federation looks at the rankings and decide who may have a promotion to the next level (C to B, B to A or A to Elite). They have finite criterias so it helps to decide (for C to B, x ratings in MS, y ratings in MD or z ratings in XD).

    To answer your question, Great, I believe you should evaluate yourself when you play your first game as if you play your first game in a tournament against a seeded player.

    JRMTL

  13. #64
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    So the idea to avoid even matchups until the end?

    Anyway..regarding the club situation..good point. Just hope that I won't be moved down for declining

    Quote Originally Posted by badrad
    what you stated is the same problem with nearly all tournaments. for instance, if the draw happens to be poorly drawn, you may wind up playing the "best" players against each other in the quarters or semis. having won the hard set of matches, you can't recover in time for the finals - and the weaker team beats you in the finals - well, after all that hard work, this weaker team get the title...

    i guess in the case of the club situation - decline the match if you are too tired. i think your answer can be - "if this is a test, then test me at the beginning of the session when i am fresh, since that will be more indicative of my level."

  14. #65
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    There is insufficient time for warmup..this is club level. So the first game won't go well for some ppl..either myself or my opponents.

    Actually..I have an idea...I'll play singles for the game.

    Quote Originally Posted by JRMTL
    In Quebec, we have 4 levels after the junior levels: Elite, A, B or C. When you suscribe for a tournament, you choose a level. I am a B-player. So, I can try to do the B, A or Elite tournament. I wouldn't be allowed to play in the C-level.

    When the season ends, the provincial federation looks at the rankings and decide who may have a promotion to the next level (C to B, B to A or A to Elite). They have finite criterias so it helps to decide (for C to B, x ratings in MS, y ratings in MD or z ratings in XD).

    To answer your question, Great, I believe you should evaluate yourself when you play your first game as if you play your first game in a tournament against a seeded player.

    JRMTL

  15. #66
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    I am the champion of the world until I am defeated, and the worst in the world until I win.

    Ratings are are kind of cross-reference against other players you may or may not have beaten, which is why I think they are a complete waste of time.

    If I were a pro, I really wouldn't be bothered about how I am compared to others. It's not worth brooding on.

  16. #67
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    The easiest way to level yourselves, within your club, is to have everyone do this: rank all the players in your club except yourself. Get the results and then voila! ... your club ranking. if there are 50 of you guys, you can class the top 25% as A, and the bottom 25% as D, or however which way you want to rank it. That should give you and idea where u are with respect to your club.

    When playing against strangers, we usually have a levelling session, where the unknowns play a few games and are observed, and then levelled accordingly. The problem with levelling would be that it can be easily fooled by idiots who jjust wanna win at all costs and play bad intentionally so they get a lower class/rank.

    Unless there is a national or international effort to level or rank all badminton players, everything will be subjective.

  17. #68
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    Default Rating of A, B, C and D levels

    Going back to Lazybuddy's original question about how someone would rate themselves in this rating system, in the UK, A is supposed to be elite national level players, B are advanced players, C are club players and D beginners.

    Realistically, D are players who've been playing a year or two, the majority of club members are C players. There are C-, C and C+ and you can tell the difference when you watch the different levels. C and C+ at the club I used to go to had matches against other clubs but C- didn't.

    B players are much stronger players, and most have been playing since they were young and have had coaching and match play throughout high school and university.

    There are casual sessions where you can play with people in different levels, and I've noticed C players sometimes have weak backhands, they can't clear from end to end with a high backhand. But B players all have decent backhand smashes, drives and clears. They're also much sharper at net kills.

    Many of the B+ players are qualified coaches and you can't really tell them apart from the A players just by watching them play. Their techniques look flawless, but they tend to be older (and usually a bit fatter too because the A players are usually in their early twenties and very fit).

    I would guess most of the serious players on this forum would be B or B+ players, with a few A- for those who play for national junior teams.

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