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  1. #1
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    Default Is newest/expensive best option?

    As some will have seen in a scattering of posts around, I am looking for a new racquet and have already considered the Yonex NS9000... What I want to know, am I choosing wisely thinking this racquet has pretty much everything I need/want?

    Some details about me and my game:

    I play once per week at present (2 hours) but I am hoping to increase that over the coming months to 2 or 3 times per week.

    I play a mixture of singles and doubles but I am wanting to concentrate on singles, once my fitness levels have returned.

    I have a mixed-bag of shots and vary from smashes, clears and drops... I do tend to use power (with placement) more often than drops though.

    I haven't played for a while but I have been told I could happily place in local league, so I presume I am of an 'intermediate' skill level and I hope that will continue to develop the more I play.

    I have problems with tendonitis in my shoulders and so appreciate any assistance the racquet can give in terms of achieving power. I also prefer a light racquet (presently got an SL80) and would like to switch to a head-light type to remove strain off my shoulder joints and tendons when swinging hard.

    Money-wise, I am happy to pay whatever I need to, in order to get the best racquet for my game and my health.... If that means forking out for something like the NS9000, then so be it. I like to stick with the top-brands, so I guess Yonex is Number 1 on my list !?!

    I am considering the NS9000 but thinking of trying to get the S type, as I feel the X may be too stiff? Would I be better getting the NS7000 (or similar)? Are the 7000 and 8000 comparible in terms of performance with the 9000? What 'new' does the 9000 have?

    Advice appreciated

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scoobz
    As some will have seen in a scattering of posts around, I am looking for a new racquet and have already considered the Yonex NS9000... What I want to know, am I choosing wisely thinking this racquet has pretty much everything I need/want?
    No, you are not choosing wisely. You are being conned by the giant Yonex marketing machine.

    Yonex floods the market with new racket models and ranges, to sucker people into buying more rackets than they actually need. They put bigger numbers on the end to make the newest model sound impressive (compare: Mp99; At800; NS9000).

    Presumably the next Yonex range will have four zeroes in the number, and all the Nano-kiddies will rush to the stores to buy the latest, greatest Yonex racket that will transform their badminton. I think they are fools, but who am I to say how they should spend their pocket money?

    There is very little innovation with each new range. The Mp series is just as good as the At series, which is just as good as the Ns series.

    Don't be a gullible consumer. Don't just buy a Nanospeed just because it is the latest.

    I'm sure the Ns9000 is a great racket; but so is the At800-DE, and the Mp99.

    Choose your racket based on experience. Try before you buy.

    Finally, note that a new racket, whatever its characteristics, will not alleviate your shoulder problem.
    Last edited by Gollum; 04-12-2006 at 08:56 AM.

  3. #3
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    I understand the marketing machine and what you are saying... I work for a Global Pharmaceutical Company and we are well adept with marketing.. !!

    As for technology, I am a scientist myself and so very much interested in new developments and can usually pick out the 'fake claims' against the genuine technological advances.

    I notice that the NS series appear to possess all the previous technical specs that the MP and AT range have, plus the new introduction of nano-technology and elastic Ti....

    I feel the NS range offers all the aspects I am looking for, but I wonder whether the 9000 is genuinely any 'better' or significantly different to the 7000 and 8000? Especially to a middle of the road player (like me) who probably won't notice any minor differences.

    I want to switch from a head-heavy racquet (SL80 is very light frame but head-heavy) plus I want to get greater power with less effort (the NS range seem to offer this, as does the MP and AT series).

    The NS7000 looks to be fairly similar to the NS9000, could this racquet suffice in meeting my demands?

    As for shoulder problems. I spent 3 years at medical school (Leeds) so know the details involving that aspect... I know I need a racquet that provides power (repulsion) and control but one that is also relatively light and is head-light (making fast movements quicker and less effort).

    The problem with trying before I buy, is that my local area (East Yorkshire) doesn't have any decent badminton equipment providers as far as I am aware, meaning there is very little choice other than buying off the internet.

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    yea try before u buy...my advise too...

    NS9000 might be right but u wont know till u try...even if that means borrowing from a friend to hit for 5 shots...

    Coz from my experience...NS series isnt my choice...i'd prefer cab 30ms or At700...those 2 are my top choice...

    But one thing is that if u start using it and keep persistent with it u'll get used to it and wont wanna change...then u prob shld stick to that no matter what yonex comes out with next...

    Like WCH lol...same good old cab 20...still as good as all those NS and Ats...coz hes damn well used to it...

  5. #5
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    I'm quite accustomed to my SL80 and it has served me well (it is a pleasant racquet) but I want to develop my game and I feel that the head-heavy aspect of the SL80 slows down fast racquet movement and hinders my speed (I aren't the smallest and most nimble person in the world at the moment).

    I don't want an 'old' low-tech racquet, simply because others have adapted to playing with them over the years... I want to adapt my play to the new technology, as I am just getting back into the game... Plus, the racquet needs to be better and technologically advanced over the SL80 I am currently using (including being head-light).

  6. #6
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    Which racket to get?

    Below is my advise to players buying new rackets.

    When you consider buying a racket, you should ask yourself this important question:- “Does it feel good in my hand?”. By this, I mean some of these questions;
    1. When you lift up the racket with your racket hand, is the weight of the whole racket too light or too heavy for you?
    2. When you hold the racket handle, is the size of the handle too small or too big for you? Note: The same racket comes with different handle sizes.
    3. When you swing the racket, do you prefer the racket head to have a lighter or a heavier feel?
    4. When you swing the racket, do you prefer the shaft of the racket to have a flexible or stiffer feel?

    Again, when you consider stringing your racket, you should ask yourself this important question:- “Does it feel good in my hand?” Of course, you have to try many of your friends' rackets, strung at various tensions, to determine at what tension it feels good in your hand.

    Did you know that the higher the tension, the more vibrations your hand will feel when the strings hit the shuttle. So, some of the questions are;
    1. When you do a hard hitting shot, do you want little or more vibrations to be felt by your hand?
    2. Similarly, when you do a touch or delicate shot, do you require more vibrations to be felt by your hand?

    Different players have different preferences. How you want to feel is most important.

    When you do a power or hard hitting shot, such as a smash or a baseline-to-baseline clear, you do a full swing to execute the stroke. Do you know that when you do the full swing, the racket shaft is bent. As you swing, the racket head is no longer on top of the handle of the racket. The racket head, because it has some weight, is behind where it is normally is.

    When you say certain rackets have certain power, do not be fooled as to how you feel as compared as to the actual speed of the shuttle. Only a speed camera can really detect the true speed(power) of the shuttle.

    Back to the important point:- How you prefer to feel when you play different strokes is most important.

    Also remember this:-The power generated in your stroke comes from your transfer of body weight, speed of you swing, timing of your swing, explosive power generated by your wrist at the moment of impact, etc...

    Do not depend only on the racket to do the work.


  7. #7
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    if u want more repulsion, change your string and strung it loosely. it will give you more replusion wiht reduce in control ability. the racket frame pretty much don't affect this (if I'm wrong some one please correct me)

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    u dont sound like above a B level player.
    u likely not notice or make gain in using the new ns9k.
    ns9k may even degrade your performance.
    since u still prefer a yonex,
    buy a 3u armortec 300 and thanks us later
    Last edited by cooler; 04-12-2006 at 10:11 PM.

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    Armortec is head-heavy... therefore not to my requirements. I am looking for a head-light racquet to help remove after-shot strain on my shoulder. I need to increase head-speed but I can't have the head-heavy design because it means when I attempt to quickly change direction of the racquet after a shot, the momentum of the heavier head exerts additional stresses on my rotator cuff tendons.

    Hence, the Nano series offers all the benefits of the Armotec with the additional requirement of head-light design.
    Would I be right in thinking the NS7000 also offers head-light design? If so, the 7000 may be a better option for me than the 9000?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scoobz
    I don't want an 'old' low-tech racquet, simply because others have adapted to playing with them over the years... I want to adapt my play to the new technology
    "Low-tech" racket? "High-tech" racket?

    There's no such thing. Boy, you are a marketing man's wet dream

    You really think that the "new technology" makes any noticeable difference to the rackets? You really believe that "nano-tubes" will give you faster smashes?

    The use of nano materials in rackets is just technological fluff -- it has minimal impact on the playing characteristics of the racket. The purpose of nano materials is to impress people, not to make the racket better.

    The same goes for "power armour system" for the ATs, and "muscle power grommets" for the MPs. It's all marketing bullsh*t.

    There have been very few genuine technological advances in racket manufacturing. In my view, the integrated T-joint and isometric head shape are genuine. Most significant of all, of course, was the development of modern carbon composite materials for lightweight rackets.

    You make it sound like the "the players of the future" are going to gain a competitive edge by using these new rackets. Us old duffers are just too long in the tooth to learn how to master the Power of Nanotechnology!

    I could pick up a Ns9000 and play just fine with it at once. I would not need to train my technique to suit a new racket -- rather, I choose a new racket to suit my technique.

    Don't worry -- you won't be "left behind" if you get an older racket.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scoobz
    Armortec is head-heavy... therefore not to my requirements. I am looking for a head-light racquet to help remove after-shot strain on my shoulder. I need to increase head-speed but I can't have the head-heavy design because it means when I attempt to quickly change direction of the racquet after a shot, the momentum of the heavier head exerts additional stresses on my rotator cuff tendons.
    What about the At800-De? Whatever the Yonex spec. says, it's an extremely maneuverable racket (perhaps even more so than the nanos). It has an even balance (or near as dammit to make no difference).

    Quote Originally Posted by Scoobz
    Hence, the Nano series offers all the benefits of the Armotec with the additional requirement of head-light design.
    Would I be right in thinking the NS7000 also offers head-light design? If so, the 7000 may be a better option for me than the 9000?
    Sounds like you have already made up your mind on the nanos

    In my view, this theoretical reasoning -- "the specification says that Nanos have AT technology, and they are headlight...." -- is a bad method for choosing a racket. Do whatever you can to try out rackets first and see how they feel to you.

    But if you can't do this.....well, I suppose a Ns7000 may be good for you, because it's *supposed* to be head-light. I can't be sure, because I haven't tried it myself and I don't trust Yonex's specs.

    Or there's the At800-De, which is evenly balanced and has almost no "drag" or "after-shot strain". I know this from experience.

    I'm not convinced by your reasoning about the shoulder injury. Getting a head-light racket might seem to be a good idea, but it could actually cause you to make more rapid swings (to generate the racket head speed), which might be bad for your shoulder.

    You may find that you struggle to get as much power as before, and consequently try to "force" the power with excessive muscular effort. This would likely hurt your shoulder. Yet another reason that you should try playing with a racket before you buy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Scoobz
    As for shoulder problems. I spent 3 years at medical school (Leeds) so know the details involving that aspect...
    Healer, heal thyself

    I have one of these injuries too. It's a real nuisance; hope yours gets better
    Last edited by Gollum; 04-13-2006 at 04:22 AM.

  12. #12
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    There is a significant difference in torque characteristics between graphite, HM graphite and UHM graphite. This is compounded by the addition of other materials like Titanium and Magnesium into those composites. Those are TECHNICAL ADVANCES and ones that I wish to incorporate into my equipment choice.

    Many have previously wanted light-weight racquets but with head-heavy balancing... I desire a light racquet but with head-light... The NanoSpeed offers this, hence my suggestion of opting for it.

    I have played with a variety of racquets recently that range 'backwards' from my SL80 (HM Graphite, dual taper, low torque) down to traditional graphite frame and aluminium shaft design... I do notice a massive difference in performance and my shoulder is very sensitive to the differences.

    I don't dispute that many will be able to pick up a 5 year old racquet and a brand new 'high-tech' racquet and play equally well to a level far above mine... I never suggested otherwise.
    I wish to buy a racquet that is going to offer a good all-round package and I do know how to select 'genuine' technology over marketing fluff (thanks). I don't see the nano-technology offering much significant (statistical) improvement in performance but it offers all the benefits of previous advances alongside the head-light design.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scoobz
    Armortec is head-heavy... therefore not to my requirements. I am looking for a head-light racquet to help remove after-shot strain on my shoulder. I need to increase head-speed but I can't have the head-heavy design because it means when I attempt to quickly change direction of the racquet after a shot, the momentum of the heavier head exerts additional stresses on my rotator cuff tendons.

    Hence, the Nano series offers all the benefits of the Armotec with the additional requirement of head-light design.
    Would I be right in thinking the NS7000 also offers head-light design? If so, the 7000 may be a better option for me than the 9000?
    u asked for advice and we gave.
    sounds like u had already made up your mind and want to seek comments that can make u feel better about your decision.

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    Trying a racquet before I buy is unlikely to happen, simply because I aren't presently a member of a club (won't be for a while until my fitness level improves) and because there are no decent shops in my locale that offer such a service. I am therefore driven to rely upon comments of others and manufacturers specifications.

    Even balance may be an option, although I wasn't aware the Armortec racquets offered that?

    I will have a further look at the AT800 DEF then alongside the NS7000... I feel I have possibly talked myself out of the NS9000.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scoobz
    Trying a racquet before I buy is unlikely to happen, simply because I aren't presently a member of a club (won't be for a while until my fitness level improves) and because there are no decent shops in my locale that offer such a service. I am therefore driven to rely upon comments of others and manufacturers specifications.

    Even balance may be an option, although I wasn't aware the Armortec racquets offered that?

    I will have a further look at the AT700 DEF then alongside the NS7000... I feel I have possibly talked myself out of the NS9000.
    u have to do more research, there is no AT700 DEF, real or fake.

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    If I considered the AT800 DEF.... If I want to increase the 'power' I get from the racquet (as it is designed for defense) in the Clear and Smash, could I obtain that from adjustments to the stringing?

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    Quote Originally Posted by cooler
    u have to do more research, there is no AT700 DEF, real or fake.
    Typo... I had amended it before you reposted.

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