User Tag List

Page 6 of 8 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 LastLast
Results 86 to 102 of 124
  1. #86
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Cannock, UK
    Posts
    2,908
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CWB001
    Yes, we've been discussing this for two days now in another thread.
    even the bit about it being unanimous?

  2. #87
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Surrey, Canada
    Posts
    1,603
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Neil Nicholls
    even the bit about it being unanimous?
    Of course it was UNANIMOUS - 100% of the 21-SS supporters all voted yes! The ballots for the non-supporters disappeared in the mail...

  3. #88
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Singapore Also Can
    Posts
    12,809
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ctjcad
    .."Badminton is already a very popular sport around the world"??..hmm, but i thought Mr. Gunalan and his cohorts want "badminton to become the world’s No.1 racquet sport by the year 2013"??..see thread
    http://www.badmintoncentral.com/foru...ad.php?t=32947

    Seemed like IBF never think there's a very massive land called America/U.S., which is basically the commercial capital in the world??..why haven't IBF invest its time and money more to popularize it in the U.S.??..
    Badminton is indeed very popular in Singapore and many parts of Asia. With the Netherlands coming in second after China in the recent Uber Cup Finals and hopefully there is media coverage in Europe, especially TV, on this world women team event, another good piece of publicity for badminton has been generated for Europe.

    In fact, Europe could be considered as a very matured continent for badminton, with so much competition in existence, particularly the professional leagues which are practically non-existent in Asia. Many European countries started the game way ahead of the Asian countries yet Asia is now the top continent for world badminton. Surely badminton must be popular in Denmark but to what extent compared with the other sports, especially the racket sports. England, being traditionally accepted as the birthplace of badminton, continues to support the game and remain the Commonwealth champion for the women's team. Germany is another European country to watch as even one of the the IBF International Training Centres is located there. It is of note that Germany qualified for both the TC and UC this year, even better than Denmark, which entered the TC only.

    Asia recently added another prospective giant, India, to the global badminton fraternity. India appeared in the TC (for the first time?) and was successful in the Melbourne Commonwealth Games, although India has from time to time produced world-class players in the past but perhaps not in the same spirit and as a coordinated team for both men and women.

    As for the US that you mentioned, despite the fact that the US was one of the very early practitioners of the badminton game, even way ahead of Asia, and had produced some world class champions, the US has lagged far behind Asia and Europe in the development of badminton there. Being the world's biggest economy and arguably the richest, the US has the means to choose whatever sports it wants and it invented American Football and perhaps baseball, which are hardly played in Asia except in some pro-American countries like Japan and Chinese Taipeh. The US, though, has managed to publicize such games, especially basketball (NBA), on TV worldwide, again because it is able to persuade the rich American sponsors to support these games.

    But why can't they do the same for badminton in the US? So it boils down to the organizers - how passionate and committed are they to bring badminton to mainstream America. The IBF has done its part last year by holding the World Championships in Anaheim. Great interest was generated and the Americans saw for themselves, at least on TV, how intense, skilful and demanding a game badminton is. But has there been sufficient followup thereafter? Who is responsible? Just the IBF alone, when it has to take of the rest of world as well?

    I think the badminton fraternity should unite and do something for themselves to promote the game in the US and make themselves counted in world badminton.

  4. #89
    Regular Member ctjcad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    u.s.a.
    Posts
    19,157
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    before i start, pardon Loh for my long reply again, hope you won't mind...
    Quote Originally Posted by Loh
    As for the US that you mentioned, despite the fact that the US was one of the very early practitioners of the badminton game, even way ahead of Asia, and had produced some world class champions, the US has lagged far behind Asia and Europe in the development of badminton there. Being the world's biggest economy and arguably the richest, the US has the means to choose whatever sports it wants and it invented American Football and perhaps baseball, which are hardly played in Asia except in some pro-American countries like Japan and Chinese Taipeh. The US, though, has managed to publicize such games, especially basketball (NBA), on TV worldwide, again because it is able to persuade the rich American sponsors to support these games.
    true, all true...but if Mr. Gunalan really wants the game of badminton to become very popular and make it "the #1 racket sports in the world", then i think they must focus on tapping and making it "big" in the U.S...This is the market to "break it big"..
    The NBA, MLB are already an "American-based" sport, with most of the clubs based in the U.S. So i can understand how the U.S. wants to expand them. But i'm sure you've seen what they've done to promote those sports outside of U.S. Not only thru broadcasting the games outside of U.S., but also playing exhibition games overseas, even having its own players play outside of U.S. But not badminton, eventhough the U.S. has started it and was successful earlier on..Now, i'm not saying badminton is an "Asian/European-based" sport, but basically isn't that's where most of the top players reside?
    But why can't they do the same for badminton in the US? So it boils down to the organizers - how passionate and committed are they to bring badminton to mainstream America. The IBF has done its part last year by holding the World Championships in Anaheim. Great interest was generated and the Americans saw for themselves, at least on TV, how intense, skilful and demanding a game badminton is. But has there been sufficient followup thereafter? Who is responsible? Just the IBF alone, when it has to take of the rest of world as well?
    hmm, yes, in a way i agree that the U.S. badminton enthusiast must push for the sport. True, IBF has attempted and tried bringing the sport to the U.S. to popularize it. But IMO, it should be IBF's vision and goal in "conquering" the U.S. so it can embrace the sport. How to do it? Well, simple, by starting to broadcast and get the game exposed to the public. Sure it will be very slow in the middel, but must persevere. Like i mentioned in my earlier post, I realized CNBC and ESPN tried an attempt in popularizing the sport in 2004 Olympics as well as last year's WC. But what happened next?? Seems like it's a 1-time deal..Is that all??..And don't know if it's true or not, but i heard after last yr's "complaints" in the WC, that most likely IBF will not do another event in the U.S. again??..heh?!?!..why??.
    IMO, i think the initiative must also come from IBF and Mr. Gunalan to "push and push" even more. If there are no live tv/cable broadcast, if possible hold 1 IBF per year in the U.S-Have it in New York, S.F., Orlando all over the U.S. and bring all the top players to show the sport. Imagine IBF as a "traveling circus". Also, since in a way IBF is not a "U.S.-based" organization body. If they can influence the top U.S. people in sport and keep "pushing", then who knows..?!?!..
    I think the badminton fraternity should unite and do something for themselves to promote the game in the US and make themselves counted in world badminton.
    I think so too, the U.S. badminton fraternity can help..
    It's a very big challenge, but without continuous exposure of the sport to the public, esp. in U.S., how will the public know and get interested??.. Like you mentioned in your post above, the U.S. arguably is "the world's biggest economy", what better way and approach this should be for IBF and Mr. Gunalan..Thing is, IMO, that should be the focus of IBF in trying to "popularize" the sport and then "make it the #1 racket sport in the world"...rather than doing all the gimmicks and scoring change etc.

  5. #90
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    France
    Posts
    146
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Can someone quantity what is #1 racket sport in the world? Is it in term of revenue generation? is it in term of number of participants?

    Currently which is #1 racket sport globally? I suppose in term of revenue generation it is Tennis, and in term of number of particpants, it is Table Tennis.

    Could Badminton be more popular than table tennis in China in term of no of particpants?

    The biggest population in the world is China and India. The big market as we all know.

    I believe IBF should try to make badminton as #1 racket sport in these countries! After all it has been achieved by Singapore!

  6. #91
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Philippines
    Posts
    90
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    why did they passed the 21-point system?? badminton games will not be thrilling.. they will simply rely on their opponent's mistakes!!!

  7. #92
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Singapore Also Can
    Posts
    12,809
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ctjcad
    before i start, pardon Loh for my long reply again, hope you won't mind...

    IMO, i think the initiative must also come from IBF and Mr. Gunalan to "push and push" even more. If there are no live tv/cable broadcast, if possible hold 1 IBF per year in the U.S-Have it in New York, S.F., Orlando all over the U.S. and bring all the top players to show the sport. Imagine IBF as a "traveling circus". Also, since in a way IBF is not a "U.S.-based" organization body. If they can influence the top U.S. people in sport and keep "pushing", then who knows..?!?!..

    I think so too, the U.S. badminton fraternity can help..
    It's a very big challenge, but without continuous exposure of the sport to the public, esp. in U.S., how will the public know and get interested??.. Like you mentioned in your post above, the U.S. arguably is "the world's biggest economy", what better way and approach this should be for IBF and Mr. Gunalan..Thing is, IMO, that should be the focus of IBF in trying to "popularize" the sport and then "make it the #1 racket sport in the world"...rather than doing all the gimmicks and scoring change etc.
    The IBF's ambition (not just Punch's) to make badminton as the world's no.1 racket sport and make it known to the world is commendable indeed. In IBF you have leaders who are bold enough to make their vision public, indirectly as a challenge to tennis. Consider the possibility of failure and the taunts that will follow. I salute them and certainly wish them well in their endeavours.

    It seems to me that the IBF is not just paying lip-service and is determined to be successful in the end. I could see that some foundations are being laid to assist in achieving its objectives. Chief among these is the necessity to make IBF financially strong. In this regard, a professional marketing agent has been appointed for Asia and the Middle East (I think) and we should see some results in the near future. But as indicated, the US will certainly pose the greatest challenge. How do you convert a rich giant who only knows badminton as a garden game? I hope the IBF, with its extensive social and professional network, will be able to arrive at something concrete very soon. We all agree that the US must play a part although we also know that even without the US, world soccer could still thrive and is the world's greatest game!

    Certainly more could be done but success cannot be achieved overnight, especially with an organization like the IBF with such a diversified membership, a multitude of views and a tumultuous history. But it is refreshing to note at least on the recent decision on the 21 rally point system, there was no dissension. Although we don't know the details, a time frame must have been set and surely priorities are also put in place.

    It is good that from time to time, even an internet group like the BC, can offer constructive criticisms (certainly not unproven and unfounded allegations of corruption) and offer interesting ideas on how to improve the game in the respective countries and worldwide in general.

    Your ideas on how to popularize the game in the US is good and I hope those concerned will take note. Hopefully a high-profile marketing agent has been appointed to deal with the hugh US market.

    Good Luck to all of us.

  8. #93
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Singapore Also Can
    Posts
    12,809
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by asuncion_03
    why did they passed the 21-point system?? badminton games will not be thrilling.. they will simply rely on their opponent's mistakes!!!
    We have discussed this topic extensively and you should be able to find some of the reasons even in the official announcement.

    It is definitely not true to say "they will simply rely on their opponent's mistakes" to win a match!

  9. #94
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    51
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Angry

    Badminton in USA has been steadily declining in the last 10 years. The USA Badminton organization has the same type of sickness that the IBF has, where it is controlled by a few arrogant and self serving individuals.

    Even though the 2005 Worlds were held in Anaheim I don't see any improvement in popularity of the sport in USA since that time. 2006 USA National championships that were held in Anaheim attracted a total of 50 players -men and women- from the whole country for all 5 individual events; large number of the participants were juniors who are not in the national caliber of strength.

    The hot bed of badminton in USA is considerd to be California. Now Southern California is losing its inter High School badminton team championships starting next year. This was a program that had been in existence for a long time and had helped bring in a large number of high school students to play badminton at their high school gyms. Considering that the USA Badminton President is also the Director for the California Region, it doesn't show well that the California students are now losing this high school badminton program. I don't see how the current USA baminton organization will work to improve the populatity of the sport nationwide when it can't even hold on to the programs that are in the USA Badminton President's own backyard.
    Last edited by dropper; 05-11-2006 at 03:54 AM.

  10. #95
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Victoria
    Posts
    197
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Loh
    The IBF's ambition (not just Punch's) to make badminton as the world's no.1 racket sport and make it known to the world is commendable indeed.
    Why is it commendable? Badminton is already a more popular sport than tennis. If you measure the sucess of a sport by its TV coverage, maybe you should spend less time in front of one.
    Quote Originally Posted by Loh
    In IBF you have leaders who are bold enough to make their vision public, indirectly as a challenge to tennis.
    I think there is enough room for more than one racket sport in the world. Challenge tennis? In what way? More people watched the olympic mixed badminton final than the any of the tennis.

    So again, tell me what the ambition of the IBF is?
    Is soccer defined by the kid playing in a back alley of San Paulo, or by the Siemens logo on beckham's shirt?

    As for "this is the real world and money matters"
    Whatever, i don't see pro badminton players starving. And that's what we're talking about right? Sponsors and money just sits around at the top 2% of the game anyway. Absolutley usless to the rest of the players of the sport. What, more money might mean more courts?
    I've never been in a gym that didn't have badminton lines.

    Tell me one positive effect for badminton from more exposure?
    If you membership up, fair enough although it's already high. And i'm sure you know a few people that don't play. Bring them out. Work at the grass roots level will work better than a rule change or two.

  11. #96
    Regular Member ctjcad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    u.s.a.
    Posts
    19,157
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chai
    Can someone quantity what is #1 racket sport in the world? Is it in term of revenue generation? is it in term of number of participants?

    Currently which is #1 racket sport globally? I suppose in term of revenue generation it is Tennis, and in term of number of particpants, it is Table Tennis.

    Could Badminton be more popular than table tennis in China in term of no of particpants?

    The biggest population in the world is China and India. The big market as we all know.

    I believe IBF should try to make badminton as #1 racket sport in these countries! After all it has been achieved by Singapore!
    I would assume the phrase "the #1 racket sport in the world/globally" means having the most revenue and then participants/followers..As of now, badminton is competing with Tennis and Table tennis...But IMO, tennis is still hands down the most "popular" of the 3..

    Sure China and India might have the biggest population and market in the world, but as far as i know, the U.S. is still basically "controlling" the rest of the world, in terms of commercialization, directly or indirectly...And that is key in marketing and promoting the game..I guess what i meant to say is "badminton needs to westernize the game even more if it's going to compete with Tennis"..

  12. #97
    Regular Member ctjcad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    u.s.a.
    Posts
    19,157
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MarkinJapan
    Why is it commendable? Badminton is already a more popular sport than tennis. If you measure the sucess of a sport by its TV coverage, maybe you should spend less time in front of one.
    Sure arguably badminton could be more "popular" than tennis. But I think Tennis is broadcasted on TV/Cable for the public to see for 1 main reason : ads = revenues. And esp. here in the U.S., they'll show them as often as possible; and same thing with golf tournaments. That's basically the main reason. And that's what Mr. Gunalan and IBF is probably referring to in saying "making badminton the #1 sport in the world"..
    Tell me one positive effect for badminton from more exposure?
    If you membership up, fair enough although it's already high. And i'm sure you know a few people that don't play. Bring them out. Work at the grass roots level will work better than a rule change or two.
    IMO, the game needs exposure, definitely. Esp. in a country like the U.S./American continent. It's safe to say it's already well embraced and well exposed to the rest of the Asian countries, and to most of Europe, but for some reason, it is not well embraced by the U.S.(eventhough i'm sure they've known abt the sport). "Working at the grass roots" is one way, definitely, but how will the public/kids get exposed if there aren't any live broadcast of the game for them to see??Only thru videos, dvd, broadband webtv etc...And by IBF not "pushing" and hold a few events in the U.S. can make us wonder...It's like trying to popularize tennis, but without showing any tennis tournaments/matches on tv/cable or holding any tournaments here...

  13. #98
    Regular Member ctjcad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    u.s.a.
    Posts
    19,157
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Loh
    It seems to me that the IBF is not just paying lip-service and is determined to be successful in the end. I could see that some foundations are being laid to assist in achieving its objectives. Chief among these is the necessity to make IBF financially strong. In this regard, a professional marketing agent has been appointed for Asia and the Middle East (I think) and we should see some results in the near future. But as indicated, the US will certainly pose the greatest challenge. How do you convert a rich giant who only knows badminton as a garden game? I hope the IBF, with its extensive social and professional network, will be able to arrive at something concrete very soon. We all agree that the US must play a part although we also know that even without the US, world soccer could still thrive and is the world's greatest game!
    Well, i understand about soccer. I know they've attempted their effort in bringing the popularity of soccer to the U.S. after the 1994 World Cup. But i'm sure FIFA and the U.S. soccer really worked hard after that. Even having some European and Latin American teams visit and play with the U.S. team. I agree with your statement i've put in bold. IMO, that's what IBF should promote also. If not thru tv/cable, then have some tournament(s) here and present the game. Not just a 1-time deal and that's it. That's why when i heard abt IBF not interested in having anymore tournament(s) in the U.S., after last yr's WC, i was quite surprised. And esp. now, after Mr. Gunalan came up with his new "goal/vision"..?!?!..Don't tell me, the U.S. is an "afterburn" after last yr's WC??..
    It is good that from time to time, even an internet group like the BC, can offer constructive criticisms (certainly not unproven and unfounded allegations of corruption) and offer interesting ideas on how to improve the game in the respective countries and worldwide in general.

    Your ideas on how to popularize the game in the US is good and I hope those concerned will take note. Hopefully a high-profile marketing agent has been appointed to deal with the hugh US market.

    Good Luck to all of us.
    sure thing, that's why there's a forum like this where we can meet with other badminton enthusiasts to talk and discuss, "freely" and with enthusiasm, about the sport. In a way if we are not doing this kind of discussions/constructive criticisms, then i wonder abt the future and "health" of the sport and its followers...

  14. #99
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    2,214
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    The various models tried by the IBF looks like big bangs and fireworks. World Junior Championships, and World Championships in North America with the attempt to generate interest and hopefully some follow-ups to take advantage, or rather to generate momentum for the game to flourish.

    From the discussions, it seems like this has failed.

    I rather like MarkinJapan's comments that to focus on the grass-root players. Slowly but surely develop more and more players who are genuinely interested in the game, and modestly fund players who are interested in participating.

    On the west coast of North America, there's a proliferation of new badminton facilities being built, California, and Vancouver, Canada, for example. The trend is happening. These facilities are mirroring the wishes of the players for quality venues for the game of badminton.

    And I would rather like to see IBF help these places out, by funding tournaments at these levels or provide infrastructors to help retiring professional players get jobs as professional coaches there.

    -dave

  15. #100
    Regular Member ctjcad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    u.s.a.
    Posts
    19,157
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wood_22_chuck
    The various models tried by the IBF looks like big bangs and fireworks. World Junior Championships, and World Championships in North America with the attempt to generate interest and hopefully some follow-ups to take advantage, or rather to generate momentum for the game to flourish.

    From the discussions, it seems like this has failed.
    Executing it only once, with a mindset of "well, we've tried it, but the likelihood of us coming back and doing this kind of thing again is not very good", will surely not help in generating interest of the U.S./North American public. How can it work if IBF mgt. have that mindset??..I'm sure IBF knows it won't be an overnight turnaround, esp. with badminton..but they won't try again??..
    I rather like MarkinJapan's comments that to focus on the grass-root players. Slowly but surely develop more and more players who are genuinely interested in the game, and modestly fund players who are interested in participating.

    On the west coast of North America, there's a proliferation of new badminton facilities being built, California, and Vancouver, Canada, for example. The trend is happening. These facilities are mirroring the wishes of the players for quality venues for the game of badminton.
    well, that's a good start...but how abt the rest of the country/continent?? Midwest, Central and Eastern to Southern U.S.??..Are we ignoring them also??..
    I guess the only way to have badminton really "flourish" in the U.S.(as a whole) is if there are "American-born" players playing and being succesful playing internationally..
    And I would rather like to see IBF help these places out, by funding tournaments at these levels or provide infrastructors to help retiring professional players get jobs as professional coaches there.
    Yah, i agree with this also, and it correlates with your above sentiment.
    Speaking of this, until now there hasn't been any news on the proposed Houston training center which was promised by IBF..or maybe it's already there??..
    anyways, i'm getting a bit off topic here...

  16. #101
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    16
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Take IBF to court?

    Like the majority in this forum, I am dissappointed and mad. Is it possible to take IBF to court over this? The change has been made by individuals at the top levels of IBF and constituent member organizations without much input from playing members of the same. Such a drastic change should be voted upon by members of national organizations (such as members of USA Badminton).
    Any lawyers in this forum who would like to consider this? And work pro bono?! Forum members may be willing to chip in some money......

  17. #102
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    28
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    The change of the scoring system.... is it really that difficult to adjust to it? and also is it really that bad that we can't even give it a try ourselves??? BTW, how many of you have tried using it in your own games before?

    I tried it the other day when playing in a club in a doubles game, and all four of us seemingly like it. Not that we don't like the 15x3 system, but we find that the rally system is acceptable, unlike what most of you complain about.

    Yes, there are differences, and there are things that we have to adjust to... but does it necessarily need to take irrational actions to try to change something that seemingly won't change for you and me.

    Badminton is a sport that requires lots of physical and mental skill, no matter how the scoring system is... nobody can take that away. If you can't win under the new system and just wish the IBF to change back to the old one so you can have a better chance at winning a tournament or something then I wish you good luck, but I would much rather practice more and win more tourneys under any system. It is much better to use the time which you use to whine about the new system to further improve your skill than sitting around on your butt in front of a computer... wait, isn't that what I am doing here... hahahaha...

Page 6 of 8 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. New Scoring System (21-Rally point system)
    By MikeJ in forum Jonas Rasmussen Forum
    Replies: 21
    : 06-05-2006, 07:03 AM
  2. new 7 point system??
    By wong in forum General Forum
    Replies: 7
    : 04-26-2006, 11:34 PM
  3. TUC Greece - 21 Point System
    By serviceover in forum General Forum
    Replies: 7
    : 02-21-2006, 09:19 AM
  4. WS Point System for SO '05
    By cheongsa in forum Singapore Open 2005 / Malaysia Open 2005
    Replies: 1
    : 06-29-2005, 08:01 AM
  5. the 7 point system?
    By dave C in forum General Forum
    Replies: 6
    : 03-20-2001, 08:41 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •