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Thread: Cuts and Slices

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    Default Cuts and Slices

    Right now I'm correcting myself on my drops when net playing. I always seem to slice the shuttle when I drop it. I've had the thought that since the shuttle tumbles, it would be more difficult for the opponent to return. The problem is that accuracy becomes a huge problem. I don't see players at the professional level do that; so I'm guessing that this is wrong. In your opinion, which do you think is a better dropping method? Why?

    Thanks in Advanced!

    Keith

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    Are you are talking about net shots (from the forecourt) or drop shots (from the rearcourt)? I'm guessing you mean net shots.

    Sliced net shots are very hard to learn; they are an advanced skill. When you slice a net shot, you are making a compromise: you sacrifice accuracy to make the shuttle spin. Typically, sliced net shots will travel higher over the net than unsliced ones.

    International singles players use sliced net shots all the time. In singles, at the top level, the tumbling net shot is arguably the most important stroke. High quality tumbling net shots force your opponent to take the shuttle lower, and therefore set up opportunities for you to attack when he plays either a poor net reply or a short lift.

    In doubles, tumbling net shots are not used so often. They can only be used when you are in a dominant position at the net, because you cannot otherwise afford to let the shuttle rise far above the net tape: in doubles, it will be killed, even if it is spinning. Spinning net shots are still an excellent way to finish a rally in doubles, when the shuttle is too tight to play a kill.

    The spinning net shot needs a lot of practice before you can use it effectively in games. It will always be less accurate than the simple, unsliced net shot, but with practice you can make the difference small enough for spinning net shots to be useful. Until then, stick to simple net shots if you want to win the rally.

    Also, remember that spinning net shots are only possible when the shuttle is close to the net. If you are playing a net shot from further back -- like a forecourt push to the net -- then it is pointless to try spinning it. You will suffer a massive accuracy penalty, and by the time the shuttle crosses the net it will have stopped spinning anyway.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gollum
    Are you are talking about net shots (from the forecourt) or drop shots (from the rearcourt)? I'm guessing you mean net shots.

    Sliced net shots are very hard to learn; they are an advanced skill. When you slice a net shot, you are making a compromise: you sacrifice accuracy to make the shuttle spin. Typically, sliced net shots will travel higher over the net than unsliced ones.

    International singles players use sliced net shots all the time. In singles, at the top level, the tumbling net shot is arguably the most important stroke. High quality tumbling net shots force your opponent to take the shuttle lower, and therefore set up opportunities for you to attack when he plays either a poor net reply or a short lift.

    In doubles, tumbling net shots are not used so often. They can only be used when you are in a dominant position at the net, because you cannot otherwise afford to let the shuttle rise far above the net tape: in doubles, it will be killed, even if it is spinning. Spinning net shots are still an excellent way to finish a rally in doubles, when the shuttle is too tight to play a kill.

    The spinning net shot needs a lot of practice before you can use it effectively in games. It will always be less accurate than the simple, unsliced net shot, but with practice you can make the difference small enough for spinning net shots to be useful. Until then, stick to simple net shots if you want to win the rally.

    Also, remember that spinning net shots are only possible when the shuttle is close to the net. If you are playing a net shot from further back -- like a forecourt push to the net -- then it is pointless to try spinning it. You will suffer a massive accuracy penalty, and by the time the shuttle crosses the net it will have stopped spinning anyway.
    So for not being very specific. Yep, I mean net shots it looks like I'll have to practise the simpler one. I'm a singles player, but it's kinda rare to play it here since we'd be "court hoggers" and I'm kinda guilty about that, lol.

    Anywayz' thanks Gollum for the info! especially about that I should make it higher.

    Keith

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    Quote Originally Posted by keith_aquino
    Anywayz' thanks Gollum for the info! especially about that I should make it higher.

    Keith
    Er, I think you might be misinterpreting my words there.

    You don't normally want to play it higher; but because it is harder to make a sliced net shot accurate, you often need to play it higher to provide a margin for error.

    Sometimes singles players use deliberately high net shots, however, so that it will fall back down more tightly (think of the shuttle path). It's like playing a haipin net shot with the shuttle higher. Of course, this only works if your opponent cannot reach the net in time.

    Normally, however, top singles players will try to keep the shuttle tight. But until you can do the same, you will have to give it more room for error, or the shuttle will hit the net too often.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gollum
    Er, I think you might be misinterpreting my words there.

    You don't normally want to play it higher; but because it is harder to make a sliced net shot accurate, you often need to play it higher to provide a margin for error.

    Sometimes singles players use deliberately high net shots, however, so that it will fall back down more tightly (think of the shuttle path). It's like playing a haipin net shot with the shuttle higher. Of course, this only works if your opponent cannot reach the net in time.

    Normally, however, top singles players will try to keep the shuttle tight. But until you can do the same, you will have to give it more room for error, or the shuttle will hit the net too often.
    Okay, thanks for the advice.

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