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  1. #137
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldhand View Post
    Perhaps a different sort of guide will be of help:


    II. Pros In The Making - For the most part, these are youngsters determined to make their way up. They have excellent listening skills, possess a willingness to develop strength & stamina, and display a commitment to hard work while still having fun. Here's another example.

    .

    this looks soooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo fUN!!!!!!!!!!!

  2. #138
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    Alright. So, I'm about to organize a tournament in our office. Levelling will start this April. In our previous tournaments, we hire organizers to hold the event. But since we're cost-cutting, they gave the responsibility to me, being the consistent champ in our office (my officemates are not strong players and not as addict as I am in badminton). I pretty much have an idea of how to level the players. I usually go with my gut feeling. The question is, what do you think is the best way to grade them in the technical aspect?

  3. #139
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    *It`s rather difficult to tell a man`s level who is both physically and psychologically stronger and tougher than you.It`s easier for someone in your level or better perfomers to tell you what level you`re in.When you travel to some other countries and play some local tournaments,you`ll realiz what level you are in too if there was a grading system.If there was one I would say this for both mentally and physically:
    1:Very beginner
    2:Beginner
    3:Upper beginner
    4:Lower intermediate
    5:Intermediate
    6:Higher intermediate
    7:Lower advanced
    8:Advanced
    9:Higher advanced
    10:Semi-professional(s)
    11:The Professional(s)

    *I believe there`s a time table for every individual because for me badminton is a life not just a game.It`s easy for everyone to reach advanced level.Although not everyone has the chance.

    *I`d make up a chart and a plan for ones who needed it for educational purpose.

  4. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by Danstevens View Post
    Complete beginner: Less than 10 hours court time, no real knowledge of grips etc. Can hit shuttles back over but no/very little control. Due to the lack of skill, I would not introduce a complete beginner to doubles.

    Beginner: Has knowledge of grips and can sometimes apply that knowledge in games ie: using backhand thumb grip for a backhand drive. Can return most shots with a degree of control. I would allow a beginner to play doubles but the result probably wouldn't be too great.

    Intermediate: Applies a variety of grips in games to enable greater control and power over difficult shots. Can return all but the most difficult shots. They play the best shot they can for the majority of situations and use a variety of shots to try and overcome their opponent. They attempt deception but it is often easily read. In doubles, they have spacial awareness of both sides of the court. They move in to positions that are beneficial for themselves and their partner and play shots that are challenging for their opponents to return.

    Advanced: A player who regularly represents their club and has a strong allround game. They are difficult to beat and have a shot for almost all circumstances. The can use slice to deceive the opponent as well as dummying shots before playing a dropshot. They use the court effectively and punish mistakes. In doubles, they (and a partner of a similar level) can split their opponents and open up space to finish the rally. They punish mistakes and very rarely get in their partner's way or make bad mistakes.

    Professional: At least as good as or better than an advanced player. I regard a professional player as someone who is sponsored and/or plays tournaments for money.
    I think this is the most accurate breakdown. I read this and was able to place everybody in my gym into a category. Thanks Dan

  5. #141
    Regular Member Blurry D's Avatar
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    I like what is used in the grading in badminton tourney in Melbourne. The normal practice is the alphabetical grading. Where Open refers to players that are at a professional or competitive level.

    Open - Profressional, Extremely competitive.
    Grade A - Very Competitive
    Grade B - Competitive
    Grade C - Slighty Competitive
    Grade D - Regular Social player.

    I like the way it is done so i am able to tag people with their skill level..
    Last edited by Blurry D; 04-22-2010 at 09:18 PM.

  6. #142
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    Still very subjective if u ask me.

  7. #143
    Regular Member Blurry D's Avatar
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    Grading is a subjective thing. You need to see it to give a certain grading..

    For person that is least knowledgeable in badminton will think a Grade C player is GOD. Else when a Open grade player will see a B grade player as a C grade..

    All in all out own judgement would be the best.

  8. #144
    Regular Member chris-ccc's Avatar
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    Arrow Grading can be abused/misused

    Quote Originally Posted by jk1980 View Post

    Still very subjective if u ask me.

    .
    And grading can be abused/misused.

    In Australia, grading is used not only to identify one's skill/ability. It is used as a structure to group players of identical skill levels to challenge each other at tournaments.

    It is hilarious to find players saying that they are of higher grades, but when entering tournaments they enter in lower grades.

    It is hilarious to find a player winning C-Grade tournaments for years on end, and not allowing others to win some trophies. And we have names for these players; We call them 'trophies hunters'.
    .
    Last edited by chris-ccc; 04-23-2010 at 03:52 AM.

  9. #145
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blurry D View Post
    I like what is used in the grading in badminton tourney in Melbourne. The normal practice is the alphabetical grading. Where Open refers to players that are at a professional or competitive level.

    Open - Profressional, Extremely competitive.
    Grade A - Very Competitive
    Grade B - Competitive
    Grade C - Slighty Competitive
    Grade D - Regular Social player.

    I like the way it is done so i am able to tag people with their skill level..
    so you're prolly A or B?

  10. #146
    Administrator kwun's Avatar
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    running into the same issue that everyone is trying to solve here in this thread.

    my company club is getting a constant stream of new members who are usually new hires as well as people who have played badminton before and is interested in joining the company club.

    since we are kinda loosely organized it is important to know at what level the new member is at, mainly to facilitate referring to the appropriate sub-group of club members matching his skill level.

    but as mentioned, everyone seems to classify themselves as intermediate or beginner, and in reality, there are many more shades of grey within each category.

    i like the modified NTRP grading system by surge. partly because it is rather detailed, and partly because it avoids labels like beginner/intermediate/advanced. since no one want to be called beginners, and no one think they are qualified to be advanced.

    however, i also see that the detail for 2.0->3.5 might be a bit too spread out, while 4.0->5.0 might be too compressed. most people i know fall into 4.0->5.0.

    Quote Originally Posted by surge

    To place yourself:
    A.Begin with 1.5. Read all categories carefully and then decide which one best describes your present ability level. Be certain that you qualify on all points of all preceding levels as well as those in the level you choose.
    B. When rating yourself assume you are playing against a player of the same gender and the same ability.

    General Characteristics of Various NTRP Playing Levels( modified for badminton)

    B.
    1.5
    You have limited experience and are working primarily on getting the shuttle in play.

    2.0
    You lack court experience and your strokes need developing. You are familiar with the basic positions for singles but play doubles like singles play.
    2.5
    You are learning to judge where the shuttle is going, although your court coverage is limited by your footwork. You can sustain a short rally of slow pace with other players of the same ability but are not using proper footwork.
    3.0
    You are fairly consistent when hitting medium-paced shots, but are not comfortable with all strokes and lacks consistency when trying for directional control, depth, or power. Your most common doubles formation is covering your own half of the court. You execute the same type of service for doubles and singles regardless of opponent.

    3.5
    You have achieved improved stroke dependability with directional control on moderate shots, but need to develop depth and variety. You exhibit more aggressive net play, have improved court coverage and are developing teamwork in doubles in both attack and defense. You can serve low quite successfully to force opponent to go into defense.
    4.0
    You have dependable strokes, including directional control and depth on both forehand and backhand sides on moderate-paced shots. You can use lobs, overheads, smashes and net with some success. Rallies may be lost due to game play than technique. Teamwork in doubles is evident.

    4.5
    You have developed your use of power and deception and can handle pace. You have sound footwork, can control depth of shots, and attempt to vary game play according to your opponents. You can return service well with power and accuracy. Aggressive net play is common when attacking in doubles.

    5.0
    You have good shot anticipation and frequently have an outstanding shot or attribute around which a game may be structured. You can regularly hit winners or force errors off of short serves and can put away weak returns at the net or half court returns. You can successfully execute lobs, drop shots, drives, overhead smashes and netting. You can handle both forehand and backhand techniques in a fast pace shots. you are often able to force weak returns from your opponents.

    5.5
    You have mastered power and/or consistency as a major weapon. You can vary strategies and styles of play in a competitive situation and hit dependable shots in a stress situation.

    6.0 to 7.0
    You have had intensive training for national tournament competition at the junior and collegiate levels and have obtained a sectional and/or national ranking.

    7.0
    You are competent in you technique and has good stamina to play competitively in local tournaments.


    what you think.

    pros or advance will all be 7.0 above so that we know they can play well...is whether they wanna play w you or not

  11. #147
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    I guess I can be 2.5 or 3.5, or simply beginner/immediate level.

  12. #148
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    thanks for the info...

    i thought im already an intermediate but hahahaha glad to say i belong to LOW INTERMEDIATE.....:-)

  13. #149
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    i have absolutely no idea where im at @_@

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