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  1. #324
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    Quote Originally Posted by taneepak
    It is best for you to get to see this dvd for yourself. I don't want to end up having to defend Prakash for what he says and for what he does not say.

    To be fair, could we disregard Prakash's DVD commentary on the low serve then in this thread?

    By the way I do hope you do appreciate that few here trying to put across their knowledge base on their formal training and teaching. Are they defending on behalf of their individual national bodies or coaches?

    Regarding the service let me quote again the paragraphs from the book The Phoenix Book of Badminton 1956 Authors EDDY CHOONG and Fred Brundle Chapter 5 Service with a Smile page 52-53
    "An important point for you to remember as server, is that it is not one type of serve that will win you the game. It is the wily combination of all the serves possible that is going to give you that welcome run of points. It is this calculated variation on the serving theme that will unsettle your opponent and give him the impression you have sheer genius.
    Get him guessing and keep him quessing should be your aim,not the development of one superb service. For with that one serve it will not be overlong before he tumbles to the fact that you are a one-serve player. He can then rush it(if it is a short serve) or smash it(if a deeper type) with impunity, making all his preparation calmly and methodically.
    In badminton the scales are heavily tipped in favour of the receiver, because of the rules governing the server and the height of the net. You cannot make your serves more dangerous. You can make them more accurate. Variety of service in itself will be a hazard for your opponent.
    To put it in a nutshell:a poor service he doesn't expect is likely to equal in value a good serve that he does.
    As server,knowing the serving positions to take up is not enough,knowing your own capabiliyies is only half the battle.You must also search out your receiver's weakness and strength and play your game accordingly"

    This book is now a collector's item for those who is keen to own the book and learning the wisdom of Datuk Eddy Choong! Yes the publication year is 1956.

  2. #325
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chai
    "
    This book is now a collector's item for those who is keen to own the book and learning the wisdom of Datuk Eddy Choong! Yes the publication year is 1956.
    Yes, certainly good for keepsake to remember a legend like Eddy Choong, who won the most number of All England titles for Malaysia!

    But half a century ago! Surely, even for the 'slow' game of badminton (slow in terms of world recognition as in the Olympics) many changes have taken place which may have made even Eddy's thinking a little outdated in certain respects, I'm sure. In those days I think scientific knowledge has barely been used to enhance the badminton player's performance compared with today. I don't think they know much of biomechanics, sports science, nutrition, etc and how they could help the athlete to do better. Lots more thinking and research on badminton have since taken place and will continue to do so as long as there are people interested to learn more in a very fast-changing environment.

  3. #326
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loh
    Yes, certainly good for keepsake to remember a legend like Eddy Choong, who won the most number of All England titles for Malaysia!

    But half a century ago! Surely, even for the 'slow' game of badminton (slow in terms of world recognition as in the Olympics) many changes have taken place which may have made even Eddy's thinking a little outdated in certain respects, I'm sure. In those days I think scientific knowledge has barely been used to enhance the badminton player's performance compared with today. I don't think they know much of biomechanics, sports science, nutrition, etc and how they could help the athlete to do better. Lots more thinking and research on badminton have since taken place and will continue to do so as long as there are people interested to learn more in a very fast-changing environment.
    Sure it is half century but please try to provide the cases that you could contradict what he had said in 1956!

  4. #327
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    Eddy Choong never delivered nor has he ever received a low serve in all his singles matches. It was always the high singles serve. Only a few players, like Wong Peng Soon, mixed their high serves with some drive serves, but the low serve was unheard of.
    However, with the introduction of lighter and more powerful graphite racquets and a new type of power badminton that required real professional physical fitness and agility training, brought in by the Chinese, things started to change. One of these changes was the introduction of the low singles serve to suit the new power game.

  5. #328
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    Quote Originally Posted by taneepak
    Eddy Choong never delivered nor has he ever received a low serve in all his singles matches. It was always the high singles serve. Only a few players, like Wong Peng Soon, mixed their high serves with some drive serves, but the low serve was unheard of.
    However, with the introduction of lighter and more powerful graphite racquets and a new type of power badminton that required real professional physical fitness and agility training, brought in by the Chinese, things started to change. One of these changes was the introduction of the low singles serve to suit the new power game.
    It is irrelevent if Eddy Choong never used low serve in single game! but I cant see how an All England double champion will never use a low serve in a single game, in his book it contains very compehensive and thorough tactical approach of using low serve in single game. A taster for you
    "A serves a short service to B. B is in the habit of receiving service near to the baseline, so this force him to hurry his return to A's backhand corner. Now A will have.....it is about a full page after!"

    Is it true that the lighter racket and better physique causing the shift to low serve in single game?

    I agree it is chinese factor but wasn't Han Jian's well known TC victory for China (must be 20 yrs ago) was due to his cleverness in performing a low serve to Liem Swee King at the last point? Who was attacking player and who was defensive player?

    The bottom line: whether it was 50 yrs ago or now; whether you are using the wooden racket or nano racket; When you serve, The words about server from Eddy Choong still hold true even he had said in 50 yrs ago! Some wisdoms and insights are timeless!

  6. #329
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    Heh! I thought Viver said that. WWC, you're getting on with age!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Winex West Can
    Huh? I swore that I read that in your post but in looking back, I could not find it being posted by Loh...Geez, maybe I'm getting old and senile.
    Last edited by cappy75; 07-04-2006 at 01:04 PM.

  7. #330
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    I'd say that the new technology has made the high serve a far more defensive shot. With a smash like mine I can crush winners off a high serves. I've got smahses past Ardy Wirinata off his high serve - and his serve pretty much comes down vertically.

    I played with my father's old wooden racquets - there is no way I could hammer a smash as hard as I do now with that old technology.

  8. #331
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    Quote Originally Posted by ViningWolff
    I'd say that the new technology has made the high serve a far more defensive shot. With a smash like mine I can crush winners off a high serves. I've got smahses past Ardy Wirinata off his high serve - and his serve pretty much comes down vertically.

    I played with my father's old wooden racquets - there is no way I could hammer a smash as hard as I do now with that old technology.
    Low serve is opt instead of high serve because of the receiver could smash faster with new racket; I agreed to that.

    I also believe the defense from the baseline smashes will be improved, and the attack on the low serve will be improved. When that happen, the high serve will be back again as the prefer serve in single game!

  9. #332
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chai
    Low serve is opt instead of high serve because of the receiver could smash faster with new racket; I agreed to that.

    I also believe the defense from the baseline smashes will be improved, and the attack on the low serve will be improved. When that happen, the high serve will be back again as the prefer serve in single game!
    that's 3 predictions in one go, stretchy isn't it

  10. #333
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    Quote Originally Posted by cooler
    that's 3 predictions in one go, stretchy isn't it
    It is just the natural progression of the game! Certainly not as stretch as if I will have to predict a low serve will be an offensive shot!

    I see it is similar to the tactical development of children's service from age 8 to age 15.

    When the kids 1st start the competition; a good deep high serve will help him win a game as most young beginners cannot smash or clear well; later he has to develop the low serve to help him to win game as he plays with the group who could smash harder; As he progress to the older group he discovers the kids are now faster to the net and could attack low serve easily; then he has to use high serve/Flick serve more often again!

  11. #334
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chai
    It is just the natural progression of the game! Certainly not as stretch as if I will have to predict a low serve will be an offensive shot!

    I see it is similar to the tactical development of children's service from age 8 to age 15.

    When the kids 1st start the competition; a good deep high serve will help him win a game as most young beginners cannot smash or clear well; later he has to develop the low serve to help him to win game as he plays with the group who could smash harder; As he progress to the older group he discovers the kids are now faster to the net and could attack low serve easily; then he has to use high serve/Flick serve more often again!
    so, isn't the best serves are the one that you think it's the best at that moment for that certain player, and not to generalize attacking versus defensive serving?

  12. #335
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    Quote Originally Posted by cooler
    so, isn't the best serves are the one that you think it's the best at that moment for that certain player, and not to generalize attacking versus defensive serving?
    There is no attacking serving in my book sorry!

  13. #336
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chai
    There is no attacking serving in my book sorry!
    Start adapting it before your book gets outdated -_-"

  14. #337
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    Quote Originally Posted by FEND.
    Start adapting it before your book gets outdated -_-"
    Can you then please provide sources where we can find such information for us to get updated.

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    The drive serve is an attacking serve that can be used in singles and doubles. Nearly all books on badminton do mention about the drive serve, and you tell me they don't say it is an attacking serve?

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    Quote Originally Posted by taneepak
    The drive serve is an attacking serve that can be used in singles and doubles. Nearly all books on badminton do mention about the drive serve, and you tell me they don't say it is an attacking serve?
    Can you explain what is a drive serve? How to execute it? And after executing it, are you waiting in the net for the kill or in the baseline for the smash?

    Please mention the books where I get this information - attacking serve.

    Also please, don't say that you never mentioned attacking serve.

  17. #340
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    Quote Originally Posted by viver
    Can you explain what is a drive serve? How to execute it? And after executing it, are you waiting in the net for the kill or in the baseline for the smash?

    Please mention the books where I get this information - attacking serve.

    Also please, don't say that you never mentioned attacking serve.
    Last one first, if you read carefully all what I have said, I have always said that the low serve is to initiate an attack and it is not per se an attacking serve. Never have I said that a drive serve, as distinct from the low serve, is not an attacking serve. I have not ventured into the drive serve controversy until now when someone says that there are no attacking serves.
    Now to the drive serve-the drive serve is one more variation to the more often used low, high, and flick-serves. It is an attacking serve that can be used in singles and doubles. To execute it, stand a bit further behind the front service line so that the shuttle will pass the net at a flatter, repeat flatter, angle needed for the drive serve. Some players like to shorten their grip to gain more control over their racquets for this type of serve. There is a temptation to bring your racquet up as a higher contact point will make it easier to drive the shuttle past your opponent. The new change in the height of the shaft will make the drive serve even more deadly. This drive serve can be used to win points outright against opponents whose overhead positions are left unguarded, or to force poor service returns. The drive serve must be executed accurately otherwise it is a kiss of death for you. The great Wong Peng Soon had a perculiar but deadly drive serve that caused his opponents to return poorly. As recent as this year's Commomwealth Games in Melbourne, the drive serve was used to devastating effect by NZ against Australia which nearly cause a "diplomatic" row. Needless to say, the attacking drive serves used by NZ were learned in Malaysia.

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