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  1. #1
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    Default Is there a thing as a Chinese Grip?

    Hi BCers,

    My badminton buddies told me that the grip I'm using whenever I smash or clear is called "chinese grip". They also told me that they read about it in BC. It is basically holding the racquet with your pinkie only... and at the instant of executing the forehand, the raquet freely swivels forward at the grip base, thus giving "intertial" power in addition to the shoulder swing and wrist pronation. I was trying to search the thread in this forum to learn more about it but to no avail despite using the "Search" on the toolbar. Is there anyone familiar with this?

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    Hi! I remember there was a topic like this somewhere before. Here's the link:

    http://www.badmintoncentral.com/foru...ght=pinky+grip

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    i think this is just like your wrist and arm are relaxed until you make contact with the birdie, then you contract everything and since everything is relaxed there is more to contract therefore giving increased power.

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    According to Badminton England's recent consultation with elite international coaches, there is no Asian style or European style of gripping. Elite coaches, almost without exception, agree on the fundamental grips. There is disagreement, of course, between coaches on the finer details; but Badminton England claim that this difference of opinion does not follow a geographical pattern.

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    Is that the grip where you hold the racquet between your index and thumb like a pen?

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    Quote Originally Posted by stumblingfeet
    Is that the grip where you hold the racquet between your index and thumb like a pen?
    It is the opposite, actually. Your index finger and the thumb doesn't grip the racquet. Its the pinkie and fleshy part of your palm that holds the base of the racquet. I use this whenever I smash at the backcourt (to give "additional" power to the smash since the velocity of the bird tends to weaken when it reaches the opponent's court, and also to give a relatively deeper angle of attack without using a jump smash) or to make attacking clear.

    Thanks guys for your replies.

    Actually I agree that there is no geographical distinction on how you grip the racquet. Fundamentals is still the way to go, just like the foundation of a house or a building. However, the finer details, as they say, developed into a personal style that you've been comfortable with and achieve your objective such as increasing power.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oggie
    It is the opposite, actually. Your index finger and the thumb doesn't grip the racquet. Its the pinkie and fleshy part of your palm that holds the base of the racquet. I use this whenever I smash at the backcourt (to give "additional" power to the smash since the velocity of the bird tends to weaken when it reaches the opponent's court, and also to give a relatively deeper angle of attack without using a jump smash) or to make attacking clear.

    Thanks guys for your replies.

    Actually I agree that there is no geographical distinction on how you grip the racquet. Fundamentals is still the way to go, just like the foundation of a house or a building. However, the finer details, as they say, developed into a personal style that you've been comfortable with and achieve your objective such as increasing power.
    I don't know.. you use your pinkie and palm when for holding a pen?!?

    Haha, I was just kidding with you man

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oggie
    It is the opposite, actually. Your index finger and the thumb doesn't grip the racquet. Its the pinkie and fleshy part of your palm that holds the base of the racquet. I use this whenever I smash at the backcourt (to give "additional" power to the smash since the velocity of the bird tends to weaken when it reaches the opponent's court, and also to give a relatively deeper angle of attack without using a jump smash) or to make attacking clear.

    Thanks guys for your replies.

    Actually I agree that there is no geographical distinction on how you grip the racquet. Fundamentals is still the way to go, just like the foundation of a house or a building. However, the finer details, as they say, developed into a personal style that you've been comfortable with and achieve your objective such as increasing power.


    In fact,there are two kinds of methord to grip the racket.It is not depends your fingers but the realtivity direction between your hand and the racket.
    One is called "east style".It is like the way you grip the kitchen knife;
    The other is called"west style".It is like the way you grip the kitchen pan.

    In addtion, when you strike the shuttle on your left,you shuld first tighten your index and thumb.If the shuttle is on your right,your shoud relax the index and thumb,tightening the other three fingers until stiking the shuttle.(at the time of stiking,you shoud tighen all youe fingers).

    Is it clear?

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    Quote Originally Posted by yumaoqiu
    In fact,there are two kinds of methord to grip the racket.It is not depends your fingers but the realtivity direction between your hand and the racket.
    One is called "east style".It is like the way you grip the kitchen knife;
    The other is called"west style".It is like the way you grip the kitchen pan.

    In addtion, when you strike the shuttle on your left,you shuld first tighten your index and thumb.If the shuttle is on your right,your shoud relax the index and thumb,tightening the other three fingers until stiking the shuttle.(at the time of stiking,you shoud tighen all youe fingers).

    Is it clear?
    Well, it (the fingering or grip) is just part of the "bag of tricks"/repertoire/ techniques that I use during a play. This is just a variation or a fancy version of the basic forehand grip.

    But just like what Kwun said time and time again in BC, basics is still important, especially for gripping. BTW, i use what you described as "eastern style" or "western style" depending on the play, i.e. net shots, clear, etc.. As I said earlier, I use this "grip" only at the deep end of the court because it gives additional power to the smash. For all other strokes, I use the basics.


    TY

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    Quote Originally Posted by stumblingfeet
    I don't know.. you use your pinkie and palm when for holding a pen?!?

    Haha, I was just kidding with you man
    Interesting..... bwahahaha... I wonder how I would look like in the office? bwahahaha

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    Quote Originally Posted by yumaoqiu
    In fact,there are two kinds of methord to grip the racket.It is not depends your fingers but the realtivity direction between your hand and the racket.

    One is called "east style".It is like the way you grip the kitchen knife;
    The other is called"west style".It is like the way you grip the kitchen pan.
    This sounds an awful lot like tennis grips

    The panhandle grip (for so it is called in badminton!) should never be used instead of the correct basic grip ("forehand grip"). No-one at the top level of the game ever does this.

    The panhandle grip has specific uses in the forecourt forehand and rearcourt backhand, but otherwise it must be avoided like the plague!

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