User Tag List

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 18 to 34 of 36
  1. #18
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Ottawa
    Posts
    1,110
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Monster
    Does sprinting 100m helps? Or maybe sprint 20m then switch direction and sprint again for 20 m and switch for another 4 times.
    Not exactly, the physical challenges are different. Consider that in badminton, the most you'll be moving is 3-4 m before a change in direction occurs. Also, the movement pattern is different - in badminton, you use the chasse and crossover steps, and also the lunge. In this case, I think that sports specific training from practising the footwork wins out over doing sprints.

  2. #19
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Singapore Also Can
    Posts
    12,456
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    This is how someone describes agility:

    Agility is the ability to change the direction of the body in an efficient and effective manner and to achieve this you require a combination of:

    Balance
    the ability to maintain equilibrium when stationary or moving (i.e. not to fall over) through the co-ordinated actions of our sensory functions (eyes, ears and the proprioceptive organs in our joints).

    Static Balance - ability to retain the centre of mass above the base of support in a stationary position

    Dynamic Balance - ability to maintain balance under changing conditions of body movement

    Speed
    the ability to move all or part of the body quickly

    Strength
    the ability of a muscle or muscle group to overcome a resistance

    Co-ordination
    the ability to control the movement of the body in co-operation with the body's sensory functions e.g. catching a ball (ball, hand and eye co-ordination)

    How do we improve agility?
    We can improve our agility by improving the component parts of agility (listed above) and practicing the movements in training.

    Agility Ladder

    In various fields of sports competition the body is constantly asked to perform movements from unfamiliar joint angles. The main objective for agility ladder programs is to promote a wide range of different foot and movement patterns. These skilled movements become second nature and the body is able to quickly respond to various angles that are required in sporting events.

    We can improve our agility by practicing the movements in training and an agility ladder is an essential tool in a complete agility program. The standard ladder is 10 yards long with 18 inch squares but you can construct your own ladder using sticks or tape. (I suppose you can also draw the ladder lines on the floor.)

    When beginning an agility ladder program introduce 2 to 4 movements. Once you master these patterns introduce new patterns. Keep in mind, this is a general recommendation as the introduction of movements depends on your athlete's ability to master the movements.

    Exercises

    Detailed below are some ladder drills you could use with your athletes.

    Exercise 1 Exercise 2

    1. Run through the ladder placing one foot in the middle of each square.
    2. Emphasize arm swing, powerful high knee drive with the toes dorsiflexed and quick ground contact.
    3. Run through the ladder touching both feet in each square.
    4. Emphasize arm swing, powerful high knee drive with the toes dorsiflexed (bend towards the upper surface) and quick ground contact.

    Exercise 3

    1. Begin by standing sideways to the ladder.
    2. Moving in a lateral fashion to your right, step into the first square with the right foot.
    3. Step in with the left foot.
    4. Step back out with the right foot.
    5. Step back out with the left foot.

    Repeat the sequence from 2 to 5 all the way along the ladder.

    Exercise 4

    1. Perform the drill in a sideways position to the ladder.
    2. Moving to the right, place the right foot into the first square.
    3. Next, step across the ladder with the left foot.
    4. Remove the right foot from the ladder placing it next to your left foot.
    5. Now, step forward into the second square with the left foot
    6. Next, step across the ladder with the right foot
    7. Remove the left foot from the ladder placing it next to your right foot

    Repeat the sequence from 2 to 7 all the way along the ladder

    Exercise 5

    1. Start straddling one side of the ladder - right foot in the first square and your left foot outside of the ladder.
    2. Do a jump to your right so your right foot stays in the ladder square and your left foot lands in the next ladder square.
    3. Do a jump to your left so your left foot stays in the ladder square and your right foot lands outside the ladder.
    4. Do a jump to your left so your left foot stays in the ladder square and your right foot lands in the next ladder square.
    5. Do a jump to your right so your right foot stays in the ladder square and your left foot lands outside the ladder.

    Repeat the sequence from 2 to 5 all the way along the ladder
    Exercise 6

    1. Begin standing sideways to the ladder.
    2. Step into the first square with the right foot.
    3. Next, step over the ladder to the other side with the left foot,
    4. Step with the right foot laterally to the next square.
    5. Next, step over the ladder to the other side with the left foot.
    6. Step with the right foot laterally to the next square.

    Repeat the sequence from 3 to 6 all the way along the ladder.

    Exercise 7

    As Exercise 6 but moving laterally with the left foot.

    Happy Training!

  3. #20
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Surrey, UK
    Posts
    4,010
    Mentioned
    14 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    There are many ways to improve your speed and agility, as others have shown.

    Remember also, however, that poor tactical choices can put a greater burden on your movement. If you smash crosscourt in singles, then your opponent may simply block straight to the net. It will be very hard to reach the shuttle in time.

    Even at the professional level, this often happens when a player smashes crosscourt. If the opponent is able to control the smash return, then the smasher is at an immediate disadvantage.

    Of course, many pros have a killer crosscourt smash and can use it to win rallies outright, even from the rearcourt. But be honest.....can you?
    Last edited by Gollum; 07-13-2006 at 06:14 AM.

  4. #21
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    1,874
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I don't think that speed and agility is your only concern here. Your legs might lack the strength to stop and push off explosively as well. For speed and endurance at the same time, 400m runs are good. Do many repetitions, perhaps up to 5 rep, resting 3 minutes in between. Try to finish the first few sets under 60seconds. If you go beyond one minute, 30sec, you probably should rest already.

    As for strength, do some weights training such as squats, leg press, leg curl and leg extension. If you are already used to doing weights training, you can try doing squat jumps with a bar bell loaded with two 5kgs. Try to jump as high as you can and jump as soon as you land and reach a half squat position. Be careful with your back though, its a good idea to strengthen it first by doing back ups. And keep it in upright position when you're doing the squat jumps. You shouldn't need to increase the weight beyond two 10kg loads. Just jump up to 20 repetitions each time. And try not to land too heavily on your heels, try to break the landing with the ball of your feet before letting your heels touch the ground. This exercise will also strengthen your calves.

    Lastly, agility depends a lot on your flexibility too. An inflexible body requires lots of strength to turn, so remember to do lots of stretching before and after exercises, esp so for after.

  5. #22
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    971
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    how u can train

    shuttle run
    soccer/basketball(where there is a lot of sudden directional change)
    skipping


    for monster: since u played with professionals, i believe their strokes are hard to anticipate as the movement is relatively consistent, and they can often flick the shuttle to rear court with a quick twist of the wrist.

    this makes it difficult to get to the shuttle. so it might not be ur fault haha
    Last edited by DivingBirdie; 07-13-2006 at 10:08 AM.

  6. #23
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Ottawa
    Posts
    1,110
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    One tip for ladder runs is to set up two parallel columns of birdies to create the ladder. Easy to set up, though one has to be careful not to knock any of the birds down while doing the drills.

    While doing these drills, keep your head up! It is a little trickier that way, but you never have your head down when you play, so it is necessary to develop a feel for your foot positioning. Football players sometimes incorporate catching the ball into some of these drills, I'm sure something might be possible with badminton to help develop awareness.

    Another note is the time intervals involved. You are working on quickness, agility and coordination, not endurance. The energy system involved is alactic, and so you shouldn't run more than 10 secs at a time continuously.What you can do is get 2-3 people to do this with you, and then you get some rest between sets while the others run through to get a 1:2 or 1:3 work to rest ratio. Remember, for agility and speed training, it is the quality of the work that is important, rather than the quantity.


    Quote Originally Posted by Loh
    This is how someone describes agility:

    Agility is the ability to change the direction of the body in an efficient and effective manner and to achieve this you require a combination of:

    Balance
    the ability to maintain equilibrium when stationary or moving (i.e. not to fall over) through the co-ordinated actions of our sensory functions (eyes, ears and the proprioceptive organs in our joints).

    Static Balance - ability to retain the centre of mass above the base of support in a stationary position

    Dynamic Balance - ability to maintain balance under changing conditions of body movement

    Speed
    the ability to move all or part of the body quickly

    Strength
    the ability of a muscle or muscle group to overcome a resistance

    Co-ordination
    the ability to control the movement of the body in co-operation with the body's sensory functions e.g. catching a ball (ball, hand and eye co-ordination)

    How do we improve agility?
    We can improve our agility by improving the component parts of agility (listed above) and practicing the movements in training.

    Agility Ladder

    In various fields of sports competition the body is constantly asked to perform movements from unfamiliar joint angles. The main objective for agility ladder programs is to promote a wide range of different foot and movement patterns. These skilled movements become second nature and the body is able to quickly respond to various angles that are required in sporting events.

    We can improve our agility by practicing the movements in training and an agility ladder is an essential tool in a complete agility program. The standard ladder is 10 yards long with 18 inch squares but you can construct your own ladder using sticks or tape. (I suppose you can also draw the ladder lines on the floor.)

    When beginning an agility ladder program introduce 2 to 4 movements. Once you master these patterns introduce new patterns. Keep in mind, this is a general recommendation as the introduction of movements depends on your athlete's ability to master the movements.

    Exercises

    Detailed below are some ladder drills you could use with your athletes.

    Exercise 1 Exercise 2

    1. Run through the ladder placing one foot in the middle of each square.
    2. Emphasize arm swing, powerful high knee drive with the toes dorsiflexed and quick ground contact.
    3. Run through the ladder touching both feet in each square.
    4. Emphasize arm swing, powerful high knee drive with the toes dorsiflexed (bend towards the upper surface) and quick ground contact.

    Exercise 3

    1. Begin by standing sideways to the ladder.
    2. Moving in a lateral fashion to your right, step into the first square with the right foot.
    3. Step in with the left foot.
    4. Step back out with the right foot.
    5. Step back out with the left foot.

    Repeat the sequence from 2 to 5 all the way along the ladder.

    Exercise 4

    1. Perform the drill in a sideways position to the ladder.
    2. Moving to the right, place the right foot into the first square.
    3. Next, step across the ladder with the left foot.
    4. Remove the right foot from the ladder placing it next to your left foot.
    5. Now, step forward into the second square with the left foot
    6. Next, step across the ladder with the right foot
    7. Remove the left foot from the ladder placing it next to your right foot

    Repeat the sequence from 2 to 7 all the way along the ladder

    Exercise 5

    1. Start straddling one side of the ladder - right foot in the first square and your left foot outside of the ladder.
    2. Do a jump to your right so your right foot stays in the ladder square and your left foot lands in the next ladder square.
    3. Do a jump to your left so your left foot stays in the ladder square and your right foot lands outside the ladder.
    4. Do a jump to your left so your left foot stays in the ladder square and your right foot lands in the next ladder square.
    5. Do a jump to your right so your right foot stays in the ladder square and your left foot lands outside the ladder.

    Repeat the sequence from 2 to 5 all the way along the ladder
    Exercise 6

    1. Begin standing sideways to the ladder.
    2. Step into the first square with the right foot.
    3. Next, step over the ladder to the other side with the left foot,
    4. Step with the right foot laterally to the next square.
    5. Next, step over the ladder to the other side with the left foot.
    6. Step with the right foot laterally to the next square.

    Repeat the sequence from 3 to 6 all the way along the ladder.

    Exercise 7

    As Exercise 6 but moving laterally with the left foot.

    Happy Training!

  7. #24
    Regular Member Notnimdab729's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    874
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Thumbs up Agility or speed???

    Hi gsc300,
    I dont think speed and agility is the main cause of yr inability to retrieve the shuttle. After u had hit yr shuttle to the back of yr opponent 's court, do pause or wait briefly for about 3 seconds before u move. This will allow the shuttle to reach yr opponent location n by the time, he or she would be hitting the shuttle to u. Then you can start moving or choose yr next move. By following what the textbook's instruction of moving back to the centre of the court after each shot will only cause u to lose balance or be deceived by yr opponent. Dont forget, once u move from a spot after u had hit yr shuttle......yr force or movement cannot be reversed immediately!!! This the "Newton's law" Try this.....n give me yr feedback,ok?
    Lee
    Quote Originally Posted by gsc300
    Hey, I got some problems on the speed (or agility) of going towards the shuttle. After I smash or drop from the back court, I ran towards the middle for the next move after that, my opponents always lift it high and back which my feet can't balance and stop (even if I have badminton shoes). I always hit it too late because i'm not fast enough. Not only that, whenever my opponet drops and netcross at me, I can't get it because I'm too slow. Is there any training of tecniques that i can learn and use to increase my speed and agility??

  8. #25
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Ottawa
    Posts
    1,110
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Notnimdab729
    Hi gsc300,
    I dont think speed and agility is the main cause of yr inability to retrieve the shuttle. After u had hit yr shuttle to the back of yr opponent 's court, do pause or wait briefly for about 3 seconds before u move. This will allow the shuttle to reach yr opponent location n by the time, he or she would be hitting the shuttle to u. Then you can start moving or choose yr next move. By following what the textbook's instruction of moving back to the centre of the court after each shot will only cause u to lose balance or be deceived by yr opponent. Dont forget, once u move from a spot after u had hit yr shuttle......yr force or movement cannot be reversed immediately!!! This the "Newton's law" Try this.....n give me yr feedback,ok?
    Lee
    3 seconds is a looong time for a badminton rally! Isn't the average singles rally under 8 seconds long?

  9. #26
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    971
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Notnimdab729
    Hi gsc300,
    I dont think speed and agility is the main cause of yr inability to retrieve the shuttle. After u had hit yr shuttle to the back of yr opponent 's court, do pause or wait briefly for about 3 seconds before u move. This will allow the shuttle to reach yr opponent location n by the time, he or she would be hitting the shuttle to u. Then you can start moving or choose yr next move. By following what the textbook's instruction of moving back to the centre of the court after each shot will only cause u to lose balance or be deceived by yr opponent. Dont forget, once u move from a spot after u had hit yr shuttle......yr force or movement cannot be reversed immediately!!! This the "Newton's law" Try this.....n give me yr feedback,ok?
    Lee
    i seriously think waiting 3 secs will land you in more trouble instead. i stil think u should get back into position asap

  10. #27
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Singapore Also Can
    Posts
    12,456
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    If you can get back to "base" quickly enough for the next shot from your opponent, well and good. It means that you have the luxury of watching when and how your opponent is hitting his return shot.

    But it would be better if, as what LB has said, you can anticipate his shot and instead of returning to your usual base, go straight to the direction from where you think his shot will come. You may even be able to 'kill' his return. An example will be when you are able to push your opponent to the base to execute a weak backhand return. You will immediately pounce to the front court to anticipate and finish it off, unless your opponent is a great retriever of the baseline back hand.

    Also remember that your "base" should never be the same spot in the center of the court. You should adopt a "moving base" instead, depending on circumstances. With experience and depending on your own shot execution, you may be able to force your opponent to return to where you intended and you may not have to waste the precious minute seconds having to return to your 'static' base and deciding from there where to advance.

    So the ability to produce good quality shots and of having a spatial awareness of the court in relation to your opponent should greatly help in your anticipation quality.
    Last edited by Loh; 07-14-2006 at 03:08 AM.

  11. #28
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    971
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    [quote=Loh] You should adopt a "moving base" instead, depending on circumstances. quote]


    YES...that's exactly how it should be. that's precisely why follow-up attacking drills are carried out

  12. #29
    Regular Member Notnimdab729's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    874
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Post Speed n agility

    Hi,
    I dont think a pause will get u in trouble I used to play with experience players who will hit the shuttle back to same position once u move back to the central position. So, his advice??? pause a while once u hit the shuttle to the back of the court i.e. loop birdie Usually I would use a quick count of 3 sec. Unless, u are talking abt half court ball or smashes, then I dont think 3 sec will apply. What I mean is that upon hitting the shuttle, dont rush back to the central position immediately.
    Lee
    Quote Originally Posted by DivingBirdie
    i seriously think waiting 3 secs will land you in more trouble instead. i stil think u should get back into position asap

  13. #30
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Ottawa
    Posts
    1,110
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I think you're over-estimating the flight time of the birdie during a rally. It might take ~1 second between shots for a clear from one end to the other, and so less than 1 second between shots for all other shots. Try counting three seconds while watching a live match (or one on video). Likely, 3-4 shots will have passed during that time.

    Quote Originally Posted by Notnimdab729
    Hi,
    I dont think a pause will get u in trouble I used to play with experience players who will hit the shuttle back to same position once u move back to the central position. So, his advice??? pause a while once u hit the shuttle to the back of the court i.e. loop birdie Usually I would use a quick count of 3 sec. Unless, u are talking abt half court ball or smashes, then I dont think 3 sec will apply. What I mean is that upon hitting the shuttle, dont rush back to the central position immediately.
    Lee

  14. #31
    Regular Member Notnimdab729's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    874
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Post speed n agility

    Hi,
    I would agree that shuttle travels pretty fast from one end to another end. This birdie flight will depend on the amount of force or strength the player hit it and also its trajectory of the shuttle. If one hit the shuttle from base to base in a loop trajectory, I think once u hit the birdie and count a quick 1 to 3, the another party would have hit the shuttle n will be on its way back to u. Agree? My quick count to 3 is for one to pause and dont rush n move away from the spot so that he or she would not caught off guard n lose the point. Thanks.
    Lee
    Quote Originally Posted by stumblingfeet
    I think you're over-estimating the flight time of the birdie during a rally. It might take ~1 second between shots for a clear from one end to the other, and so less than 1 second between shots for all other shots. Try counting three seconds while watching a live match (or one on video). Likely, 3-4 shots will have passed during that time.

  15. #32
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Vancouver, Canada
    Posts
    2,373
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gsc300
    Hey, I got some problems on the speed (or agility) of going towards the shuttle. After I smash or drop from the back court, I ran towards the middle for the next move after that, my opponents always lift it high and back which my feet can't balance and stop (even if I have badminton shoes). I always hit it too late because i'm not fast enough. Not only that, whenever my opponet drops and netcross at me, I can't get it because I'm too slow. Is there any training of tecniques that i can learn and use to increase my speed and agility??
    Not sure if it is a speed problem or the fact that you are unable to stop and change direction to allow you to get to the shuttle. A few things, even though you are supposed to move back to your base after your shot BUT if your opponent is already hitting a reply before you get to your base, then you should have definitely stop when he's hitting so that you can gauge where you are suppose to go. This is true no matter how far off you are from your base. DO NOT be in motion when your opponent is hitting his reply.

    The other issue is be able to stop and change direction quickly. The easiest way is to hop to a stop and pushes off. I know that it's not natural but with a bit of practice, you should be able to do it without a second thought.

  16. #33
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Edmonton, AB, Canada
    Posts
    51
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    You shouldn't return to centre court after every shot. If you're balanced after a shot, you should be able to get to anywhere on the court from anywhere else. Speed in badminton comes from how fast you see the shuttle, not how fast you run.

    After your shot, your body should be balanced and you should be watching the shuttle. When your opponent hits the shot, you bounce on your feet. Of course, after a shot, your recovery step should take you almost back to center-court, but that recovery step should be automatic if your stroke and body during your shot is correct.

    After your first shot, if you're balanced, and your recovery step is good, you should be able to simply bounce get to your second smash easily.

    Hopefully that all made sense... I'm a little out of it.

  17. #34
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    180
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Try doing beep tests. A kind of shuttle run with levels. Boredom to do alone but greatly helps build leg strength. Tennis players tend to do a little bounce prior to making any moves on the court, I think it's called pre-stressing or something. I tried it and it helps with change of direction. Prevents to some extent being caught of balance.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. How To Improve Your Accuracy, Speed, Agility And Backhand?
    By Darma Sucipto in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 8
    : 07-07-2010, 01:39 AM
  2. Agility training - IMPORTANT (please read)
    By ladyabsinthe in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 5
    : 09-30-2007, 03:53 PM
  3. How to Improve Agility And Speed???
    By Darma Sucipto in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 11
    : 07-16-2005, 01:47 AM
  4. Replies: 13
    : 06-24-2005, 08:00 AM
  5. Replies: 14
    : 10-03-2003, 02:51 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •