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  1. #18
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    experienced players most of the time can tell if it's going to be out or not unless it's very very close to the line. even the not-so-experienced ones can tell if it's ridiculously far :P and given the proper technique (and a birdie that actually runs), your opponent would have no trouble clearing your slightly-out shot to your baseline

  2. #19
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    setaa: you are pretty right. I seem to have the problem of not knowing when the shot is out esp at the baseline. probably works on people like me, but as you said, usually wouldn't work on ppl who have that good "feel".

  3. #20
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    A simple way that I have used in doubles where you and your partner are in defense-mode (side-to-side), and the opponent is in attack-mode (front-to-back) and the opponet is doing smash or drop shots is to drive the shuttle back to the back two corners. Alternating from left to right. As long as the opponent remains in attack mode and the attacker at the back is constantly smashing or dropping, this technique requires little energy on your part (mainly wrist and forearm), and a large expenditure of energy from the attacking opponent. They will run back and forth and since they are often hitting the shuttle from a sideways motion, they often have less time to aim or strategize. This sometimes gives you the opportunity to attack if a poorly returned shuttle is hit. I have often used this in doubles games and have even tried it in singles games. I'm sure this technique could be more effective in singles games as it opens up two more corners for attack (the corners near the net).

  4. #21
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    The don't finish the rally thing is a little misleading. To clarify, I think one should keep placing the birdie, when one has the upperhand in the rally, as when you are the one moving the opponent. If you keep hitting slow shots that does "no damage" to your opponent, and you keep running forever, you will definitely tire before he/she does. As for the half/'3/4' length clears, try hitting 'relatively low' clears where the opponent thinks he can get to, but it is actually bait for him to jump up and smash/cut it off and when he hits the fast shot, he is offbalance or still in the air, and you start taking control of the pace (assuming you can block that shot, use that strategy situationally, badminton is almost always, depending on the situation). Oh, and I THINK that the hardest combination of the two corners is NOT the diagonal, but rather going from the front forehand corner quickly to the back forehand corner. So depending on the level of your opponent don't always flick him off at the net diagonally, though it may seem the longest distance, if he's fast, the diagonal is actually easier to get to. He/she wastes more energy going from forehand net to forehand backcourt, if the pace is fast, and assuming that the shot he/she plays isn't a shot that gives enough time for himself to return to the middle because he wants to pressure you (when you play at a pace where "there is no middle"). The concepts are weird, and my explanation isn't that good, but try it out. Again, strategies given to others on BC work depending on the level of play, and if you read this and try the strategies and come back thinking "bethuneguy, your strategies don't work, or you are full of crap", I apologize. Badminton is very situational.
    edit: on the above post, you are assuming your defence is stronger than their attack.
    Last edited by BethuneGuy; 08-06-2006 at 07:56 AM.

  5. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhuzyBuny
    I have often used this in doubles games and have even tried it in singles games. I'm sure this technique could be more effective in singles games as it opens up two more corners for attack (the corners near the net).
    it might work pretty well in doubles, but not in singles. to be honest, if you could do that trick to your opponent, most likely, he didn't add a good angle on that smash.

  6. #23
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    To exhaust your opponent, disrupt the rhythm of his footwork, or 'jerk him around'. You can catch him on his hop back to the middle and then hit the birdie while he's in the air, or he's lost his momentum. The downfall of this, is that you're draggin the game on, and it can be detrimental if your opponent is fit. This works when you are in control of the tempo of the rally. When your opponent decides to play faster than you, I think this won't work, since you will have to play faster than him or slow the rally down. Playing faster than him and doing this, will waste your own energy, and slowing the rally down is harder than it sounds when playing a fast opponent.

  7. #24
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    If you play everyday u will realise how to topple his sudden change in direction AND centre of gravity although hitting four corners is a good tactic it does not work at all for people that have good footworks.

    Deception?

  8. #25
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    Deception most often (not always) end your opponent's movement because he will be "cut-short" by your successful deceive. So, it probably won't wear him out for the subsequent shots. Unless he still tries hard to keep up with his lost time due to your deception.

    Would returning cross shots ( or lateral shots) be better than returning behind his/her body's shot, after a drop shot at the net ? Which would tire him/her out faster after he returns your dropshot ?

  9. #26
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    anything that requires your opponent to change his/her movement in the exact opposite direction that s/he was previously heading would tire your opponent the most, imo

  10. #27
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    not when ur opponent thinks that he/she has been deceived and thinks there is no further pt to attempt for a desperate rescue. I sometimes do that to conserve energy in my singles when I feel that I've just fallen into my opponent's trap.

  11. #28
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    I believe that with the new rally system, a person should not concentrate on tiring an opponent, but should just put main focus on winning rallies.

    Often, trying to tire out a skilled, but unfit opponent will lead to errors. This can be costly in the new system.

    A tired opponent can use many tactics to get rest.
    -taking time to towel off sweat
    -taking a drink
    -testing the shuttle, switching shuttles too
    -taking time to return the shuttle to your side (if you won the rally), and not necessarily placing the shuttle within quick reach
    -60 second break at 11 points

    Be cautious about tiring out opponents, do not sacrifice point making opportunities, normal tiring tactics should create these opportunities, and take them when they are there.

  12. #29
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    For social games, even in competition, it hardly matters if the server tries hard to speed up the game by not allowing his opponent to take a longer time to recompose himself before receiving the service.

    But for official tournaments, like those sanctioned by the IBF, where a qualified umpire is in attendance, he can penalize a 'slow' player who persistently behave in such a manner, first with a warning, then a yellow card and then a red card!

    I understand that when the server is ready to serve, the receiver is expected to be ready to receive without undue delay. He can't go on disrupting the rhythm of the server.

  13. #30
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    Before the change to 21 point rally scoring system it was alot easier to plan a strategy to tire the other player. I use to play clears to backhand or forehand to see which corner was harder for my opponent to move from. Then I would play 3 or 4 shots to that corner no matter where my opponent played the shuttle only then would I move them away from there. Repeating this a few times would tire them enough to punish them reducing their recovery time alot.

    Once I had this done it is easy to control the rallies as they are struggling to reach the shots in any long rally. The big downside of this approach is that if the player you are against is fitter than yourself you will be in for a long match :P

    As my coach use to tell me playing clears in singles was like body punching in boxing eventually it would wear you down.

  14. #31
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    I seem to be playing with people a lot fitter than me. I normally would play very well until, say, the 10th pt. My performance deteriorates afterwards due to my slowness and reluctance to move anymore.

    My footwork isn't perfect but I am sure it is also because I am not willing to move anymore after my first 6-10 points, playing the old system. Maybe I am being exhausted by my opponents. They play a lot of clears and then sudden drop. I tried the same on them, but they seem to be able to get pretty quick. I guess it's either they have really good footwork or am just fitter.

    Btw, do you guys ever consider body mass index as an indirect indicator of how fit you potentially could be vs your opponent ? Obviously a big size guy would have to be extremely fit to keep up with a skinny guy of normal stamina. Hence, the thread to tire out your opponents with every single opportunity to create more opportunities for scoring thru, e.g killing.

  15. #32
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    Monster,
    The clear drop technique is used when the opponent has difficulty or is unable to clear far or high enough. If you were to return the clear with another clear you would have enough time to return to the center of the court and allows you to return drops. Another way is to either drop or smash in a strategic position which would cause the opponent difficulty to return.

    Smaller build individuals does not guarantee stamina, in fact, by having smaller builds, they utilize more energy in order to generate enough speed and momentum to hit the shuttle especially in smashes and clears. It would be beneficial to have a slightly smaller build as it seems there is an advantage in speed but as seen in other threads, one should not just play badminton. Many people recommend exercising in other means such as swimming, jogging, skipping etc. These are all used to build stamina.

    If you can swim for long periods of time in high energy states, your body learns to operate under low oxygen environments and thus is able to better respond when air supply is constant (i.e, while playing badminton). Jogging strengthens both the lungs and legs. The lungs need to constantly expand and contract at maximum capacity in order to properly fuel the body of vital oxygen. The legs are also in constant motion which will help in fast paced badminton games.

    Footwork can always be improved upon.

  16. #33
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    phuzy, do you give up or fall trap to standing slightly nearer to the baselnie if your opponent keeps giving baseline clear returns to you and then when he sudddenly drops, that's when you are caught? I do that as I realise I get tired even by moving back to the baseline from my central position if he keeps giving high clears. Perhaps, my footwork really sucks.

  17. #34
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    Footwork would greatly improve your ability to return to the center of the court but as you have said, returning to the baseline and moving slightly closer to it everytime because of your body tiring, is a very effective strategy to tire you. But, have you considered clearing back? The possibility of turning that clear into an attack is very probable. You can smash or drop and not necessarily directly at the opponent.

    By smashing, you put the opponent under a lot of pressure to return to the center in order to return the smashes. From that position you can drop, net, drive, and clear to the four corners.

    By dropping, your opponent will move up and can either net, or clear. At this point, if you are not extremely tired, you can try to get to the birdie as fast as you can and clear. When he is moving back, that gives you time to prepare for his shot, and quite possibly, attack.

    The way I personally handle these situations is by reading my opponents movement. By studying how they move before each shot, you can accurately predict what the opponent is going to do. The problem with this is, if your oppoent has the ability to decieve you (i.e, at the net, he pauses before hittime the birdie, causing you to assume he is netting, but in fact, at the last second, drives the birdie back). Another way I handle this is by returning a bait clear where the clear seems to be high enough to jump and return for the opponent but is actually quite a bit higher and thus the opponent misses the shot. I also look at where the opponent is hitting from, if he is running to return to the center, I might hit it to where he was running from. His body's momentum will cause him problems to suddenly revert back to that direction.

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