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  1. #35
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    Originally posted by AKFT
    I don't think boxing is a "martial art
    Actually, any practice or activity that can be applied to fighting is a martial art. Martial means military. Archery is a martial art. Shooting is a martial art. The Olympics used to be a huge martial arts competition before the addition of such uninteresting events as ballroom dancing, synchronized swimming, badminton, etc.

    I think what most people mean by "martial art" is the leaping, kicking, punching, blocking, etc.

    Phil

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    Dont forget, a lot of martial arts forms require excellent footwork

  3. #37
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    boxing is a martial art in a way, since it is a system of fighting. The difference is the end goal of boxing vs martial arts - most martial arts the purpose or end goal is a system of fighting which attempts to apply or safegaurd against any situation (although none of the martial arts truely can accomplish this)

    the goal in boxing is not self defence but rather competition in a sport situation - but boxing techniques could, and often are taken out of that context for the same purpose (self defence etc.)



    i think boxing training would be really good for badminton ... but i find hitting the heavy bag can be hard on the shoulder sometimes.

    one thing i've noticed in doing taekwondo with badminton - is that badminton benefits that martial art moreso than the martial art benefits badminton - the same is true of tennis -- badminton made my footwork and lightness of step better on the tennis court - but i notice almost no benefits to my badminton game from playing tennis.

  4. #38
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    From the perspective of training, the two have a lot in common... You aim at getting the end result of victory through as little effort as possible-- that's the difference between hacks and people who have actually trained. All techniques are tools-- at first, we have to work to get those tools, then learn how and when to use them, and then, we have to be able to forget that they are tools and just use them naturally when they should be used. (Like, a kid who gets a hammer, who can barely use it properly... then when he does, he uses it and hammers just about anything and everything. When he's an adult, if there's a nail that needs hamemring, he gets out the hammer-- no questions asked, nothing special. It's the right time and place.)

    There's an old bruce lee saying, roulgy saying that, when I didn't understand, a punch was just a punch, a kick was just a kick. When I started learning, a punch was no longer just a punch, a kick was no longer just a kick. And now that I understand, a punch is just a punch, a kick is just a kick.

    Both in badminton and martial arts I,ve found, it's one thing to see a technique done. It's another thing to try and do it yourself. And it's another thing to stop overusing the technique because you can do it-- in the end, you have to understand that all things have their time and place.

    On another note, though it's true that a lot of movements and training mentalities may be similar between martial arts and badminton, I think that overal the greatest benefits that I've been able to use from badminton to martial arts and vice versa are the psychological tactics, and basic analytical ability.

    I find it more similar to playing doubles than singles though. I've done stuff from groundwork to mixed to standup fighting, and speed at which one must attack and deffend, the constant pressure, is very similar.

    I've found that the the main plusses of doing martial arts is that in badminton, you learn to appreciate and notice details, and the importance of being not only technically proficient an athleticly well grounded, but what i call "agressively opportunistic".

    Appreciating these aspects of combat can be directly beneficial to the mental aspect of a badminton player's game. The defining characteristic of inexperience in both martial arts and badminton and pros is the overemphasis on brute force or athleticism-- the real way to go in fact is in the direction of efficiency, which in turn entails appropriateness of action and effectiveness of tactics. If your opponent has a solid guard around his body, you don't just keep on hooking to the body hoping to land the ko... you go for his legs, you go for his face. Similarly, if the opponent is ready for your drive, maybe you should smash, maybe you should clear. Maybe you should crosscourt drop. Whatever.

    Back to what I call being "agressively opportunistic". Also, you don't just take advantage of openings when sparring, or in badminton. Let me reprhase that. You don't rely on handouts and freebies from your opponents. You determine what are your opponents' weaknesses, and then you use that knowledge to MAKE your own openings.

  5. #39
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    Those things I mentioned actually apply to most sports i suppose.

    'Cept, maybe, for "closed system" games like golf of bowling, where your opponents moves in no way affect your own.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil
    Actually, any practice or activity that can be applied to fighting is a martial art. Martial means military. Archery is a martial art. Shooting is a martial art. The Olympics used to be a huge martial arts competition before the addition of such uninteresting events as ballroom dancing, synchronized swimming, badminton, etc.

    I think what most people mean by "martial art" is the leaping, kicking, punching, blocking, etc.

    Phil
    nod, under a martial law, even kicking, punching, clubbing, eye poking, etc are martial art

    on a serious note, having jet li and jacky chan into badminton speak volume about mutual benefit of each discipline.
    Last edited by cooler; 06-30-2005 at 05:11 PM.

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    They are definitely a good mix. I do shotokan Karate. Among the major Karate styles, this one has the widest stance. In Shotokan training, you have to a specific stance for a time. My legs were shaking the first time I trained in Karate! It's very good leg training. In many of their techniques, you are encouraged to lunge as fast as you can. Conclusion: very good footwork training.

  8. #42
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    Question badminton and martial arts

    did anyone notice the similarities between the game and martial arts?

    some of the jumps, slashes, defends resembles kungfu movement and even the smashes / backhand clears mimic the wushu swords play.

    the countries who're currently leading the game are famous for their martial arts. the chinese with various forms of kungfus, the koreans with taekwondo (and other -dos), malaysia & indonesa with the malay /silat martial arts..

    as for the danes.. i guess it must be the viking blood in them.


    can we actually play better game if we get martial art training?
    comments?

  9. #43
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    lol interesting thread, but i seriously thought about this before. all u have to do is picture yourself holding a sword instead of a racket and doing the same thing lol. also there's a bird slicing movement. but perhaps people who really know 武术 will be laughing their asses off at us.

  10. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by carimari
    did anyone notice the similarities between the game and martial arts?

    some of the jumps, slashes, defends resembles kungfu movement and even the smashes / backhand clears mimic the wushu swords play.

    the countries who're currently leading the game are famous for their martial arts. the chinese with various forms of kungfus, the koreans with taekwondo (and other -dos), malaysia & indonesa with the malay /silat martial arts..

    as for the danes.. i guess it must be the viking blood in them.


    can we actually play better game if we get martial art training?
    comments?
    search threads on jet li

    i also made many reference and comparison of martial art to badminton in various discussion

  11. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by carimari
    can we actually play better game if we get martial art training?
    comments?
    Martial arts are all about mastering the body, with some working on the mind and spirit as well. A definition of Kung Fu would read: "skill developed over time". I think Wushu is the term for actual martial arts.

    In that sense, our badminton is Kung Fu, providing we work on it consistently.

    Also, martial arts help most of our physical capacities, and we have things to gain from each. At the time when I did TaeKwon-Do, I had wicked reflexes, and applied them everywhere (I still tend to catch falling objects with my foot for some reason...).

    Which badminton player wouldn't need better reflexes, stamina, power, form, etc...? If not the art, practice the spirit of Kung Fu.

  12. #46
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    IMO, technically speaking, badminton and martial arts share the common principles:
    - Breathing technique
    - Relaxation
    - Keeping balance

    Finally, like martial arts, badminton may be more of an art than a sport. :-)

  13. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by huynd
    IMO, technically speaking, badminton and martial arts share the common principles:
    - Breathing technique
    - Relaxation
    - Keeping balance

    Finally, like martial arts, badminton may be more of an art than a sport. :-)
    plus quickness, explosiveness, etc

    i'm sure many members can identify more

  14. #48
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    come to think of it.. i think badminton can be a more accurate measurement tool of the reflexes of each of the (available) martial arts.

    for some reason i think all recent martial arts tourney (except the one with wooden swords) have become too samey.

    not too much 'art' left in them.. all involving same kicking/punching irregardless of the original root of the form.

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    Quote Originally Posted by carimari
    come to think of it.. i think badminton can be a more accurate measurement tool of the reflexes of each of the (available) martial arts.

    for some reason i think all recent martial arts tourney (except the one with wooden swords) have become too samey.

    not too much 'art' left in them.. all involving same kicking/punching irregardless of the original root of the form.
    Tournaments held are usually extremely standardized. One of the reasons Karate and TaeKwon-Do are so popular in America is that they're simple, standart martial arts. You'll notice they're not very efficient in a real fight, either.

    You have to dig deep in the world of martial arts to find good stuff these days... Most schools are more interested in selling their system and making it flashy than actually teaching people either art or an efficient system.

    A lot of people these days take the same path: they learn all manners of martial arts and take what works for them. People take pride in that without realizing that they're actually a part of the masses.

    That's why I'm making my own system now. Focus on efficiency and pure learning, not just copy-pasting what's already there...

    Oh, and there's much more reflex involved in TaeKwon-Do sparring than any badminton doubles.

  16. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhoenixMateria
    Tournaments held are usually extremely standardized. One of the reasons Karate and TaeKwon-Do are so popular in America is that they're simple, standart martial arts. You'll notice they're not very efficient in a real fight, either.

    You have to dig deep in the world of martial arts to find good stuff these days... Most schools are more interested in selling their system and making it flashy than actually teaching people either art or an efficient system.

    A lot of people these days take the same path: they learn all manners of martial arts and take what works for them. People take pride in that without realizing that they're actually a part of the masses.

    That's why I'm making my own system now. Focus on efficiency and pure learning, not just copy-pasting what's already there...

    Oh, and there's much more reflex involved in TaeKwon-Do sparring than any badminton doubles.
    kung fu on tv and movies are for show and cool effect , not practical in real fight. Bruce lee students have said they wouldnt never use those kung fu moves from movies in real fight.

  17. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by cooler
    kung fu on tv and movies are for show and cool effect , not practical in real fight
    Well, they never show Kung Fu in its true light in movies. Even Bruce Lee never showed his true style, Jeet Kune Do, in his movies. He knew the difference between practical MA and movie MA. He was too fast for the camera anyways...

    I've done some White Crane style of Kung Fu along with a bit of Shuai Jiao last year. I can tell you from that experience that true Kung Fu is all about efficiency. It can be a dangerous style if it's understood and applied properly.

    I'm pretty attentive to detail and have a practical mind, along with previous experience in the MA. My master actually told me not to show the other students what I realized better than them, since some techniques could be too dangerous when used the way I understood them.

    I think the origin of Kung Fu had something to do with monks copying the movements of animals and using the resulting fighting styles to fend off thieves and such... So its original use was purely practical.

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