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  1. #1
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    Default How do you train your arm for better swing?

    Hi,

    How will you train your arm for a better swing?
    As I just bought NS9k-X. It is a very stiff(xtra stiff) racket. Not that easy to make the birdy flying

    So, how will you train ur arm at home? push ups?
    I don't have weight, I can get 15 to 20lb if I really need one..

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    Quote Originally Posted by rayraymond
    Hi,

    How will you train your arm for a better swing?
    As I just bought NS9k-X. It is a very stiff(xtra stiff) racket. Not that easy to make the birdy flying

    So, how will you train ur arm at home? push ups?
    I don't have weight, I can get 15 to 20lb if I really need one..
    I use a squash racket with added weight and the frame , i just swing it like a normal stroke but with power (without shuttle). I think if you do a search , you can find alot information in this forum.

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    ok, so you still swing that at home?
    i saw people doing that in the gymnasim.

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    what squash racket will you recommend? and how many lb of the string?
    I only need a cheap one to train my arm

  5. #5
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    Stiff rackets are generally for more 'wristy' players. So it's really important to have the correct technique, foot position and angle when performing your shots. Technique is everything.

    I use a NS8k strung at 25lbs and have no trouble clearing from baseline to baseline effortlessly (with my new technique, my backhand is actually 3-4 feet too strong ^^"). I've been playing for two years and never worked out. I don't do push-ups or other arm-strenghtening exercises.

    Stiff rackets are hard to play with if you're used to flexible shafts already, too. Give yourself more time with your racket too, and focus on putting your whole body into the shot and hitting that sweet spot.

    Don't forget to pronate your arm either.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PhoenixMateria
    Stiff rackets are generally for more 'wristy' players. So it's really important to have the correct technique, foot position and angle when performing your shots. Technique is everything.

    I use a NS8k strung at 25lbs and have no trouble clearing from baseline to baseline effortlessly (with my new technique, my backhand is actually 3-4 feet too strong ^^"). I've been playing for two years and never worked out. I don't do push-ups or other arm-strenghtening exercises.

    Stiff rackets are hard to play with if you're used to flexible shafts already, too. Give yourself more time with your racket too, and focus on putting your whole body into the shot and hitting that sweet spot.

    Don't forget to pronate your arm either.
    What do u mean by 'wristy' players.. can i have a better definition for it?? Can i also have a definition for stiff rackets?? tks..

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    Quote Originally Posted by msl_turtle
    What do u mean by 'wristy' players.. can i have a better definition for it?? Can i also have a definition for stiff rackets?? tks..
    I use 'wristy' in the sense that some players, generally more experienced players, have strong wrists and tend to input a lot of power from there into their shots. They use their wrist more than the rest of the arm, and play a lot of shots off the wrist. Because of that, those shots are generally pretty deceptive.

    'Flexible' and 'stiff' refer to the shaft of the racket, the part connecting the head to the handle. Some rackets have a flexible shaft that allows the racket, in the swing, to bend backwards before 'springing' forwards to hit the shuttle. Stiff rackets are... well... stiff. It's easier to mishit, and it doesn't have the added power from the 'trampoline' effect of the flexible shaft. On the plus side, it's more accurate.

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    Quote Originally Posted by msl_turtle
    What do u mean by 'wristy' players.. can i have a better definition for it?? Can i also have a definition for stiff rackets?? tks..
    As I know, the rackets with stiff or extra stiff shaft suit more powerful and faster players. For a C or D grades' player, flexible shaft may be better. Can someone tell me whether it is correct?

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    Quote Originally Posted by jckuo
    As I know, the rackets with stiff or extra stiff shaft suit more powerful and faster players. For a C or D grades' player, flexible shaft may be better. Can someone tell me whether it is correct?
    That's about right. I consider myself B level and it took me about two months to really start using my NS8k properly. Stiffer shafts are harder to use, and it's better to learn with a flexible shaft.

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    Peter Gade used an mp 88 for quite a while, a rather flexible racket, until changing to the AT 700. Stiffer rackets require a faster swing I think. A squash racket is good, unless you are plagued with a bad swing that has become habit... then a squash racket will just reinforce the bad swing. Get it checked out by a good coach, and start with the right grip . (the grip is seriously one of the most important foundations of hitting technique, some older coaches still teach the 'snap' the wrist down with a neutral-eastern grip, but most pros use a more western grip and 'pronate' the wrist (tennis terms, dunno what it's called in badminton)). My coach and some other coaches teach how to swing at first by 'not adding power' to your swing, and letting the swing do most of the work. I think what they meant was to not tense up and hammer the bird to get your swing right, but find the most efficient stroke first, then add power to it. So a good stroke would be effortless.

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    So Nanospeed 8000 is a stiff racket.. i'm using a ns 8000 now.. it also took me about a mth to get use to it.. so whenever i play right.. i use my wrist most of the time.. so is it better if i use a stiff or a flexible racket??

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    Quote Originally Posted by msl_turtle
    So Nanospeed 8000 is a stiff racket.. i'm using a ns 8000 now.. it also took me about a mth to get use to it.. so whenever i play right.. i use my wrist most of the time.. so is it better if i use a stiff or a flexible racket??
    Well, you'll need good form too. It's harder to play a stiff racket because it gives you less space for mistakes. Plus the sweet spot is smaller on the NS series, I think. It's the case for NS8k, anyways...

    Usually, if you're using a stiff racket like this one, you already have good technique, i.e. foot stance for different shots, forearm pronation, whole-body timing, etc... Like I stated previously, I'm easily a B-level player, and one of the players at the gym told me I'm probably not ready to use an NS8k well yet.

    After seeing Chen Hong and Lee Chong Wei use them, I completely agree, but I'm working hard on my form whenever I can.

    Here's a pointer: if you have to use power to clear from baseline to baseline, your form isn't good enough yet ^^

    A bit like BethuneGuy said.
    Last edited by PhoenixMateria; 08-23-2006 at 12:35 PM.

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    When the player is ready, the racket will appear...

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    Quote Originally Posted by rayraymond
    ok, so you still swing that at home?
    i saw people doing that in the gymnasim.
    yea , i still swing every now and then, it has really helped me alot especially my backhand.

    You can just use any type of squash racket, i bought a cheap type and it is quite heavy and i use old grips and wrap it around the frame to add weight. About the string, i dont use it to play and the string that i use are factory strings.

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    i have ns8k, if you think it is stiff(if it say stiff), then at800 is even stiffer.
    and if you say at800 is stiff, ns9k-s is even stiffer... so as ns9k-x..

    too bad i am now using ns9k-x, i know i am not ready for this racket yet.
    I believe that the timing hitting with NS series is very important. I need to stretch a little further this NS series. Like NS9k, i need me stretch as far to make a hard hit, but this could trouble the hitting timing(the very tiny sweat spot)

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    if now if i were to be able to hit for base to base just a slight movement with my wrist with a ns8k with string tension of 25lbs, do u think i have already "master" the use of the racket or other words ready for the racket??

    Pls give me your opinions.. tks

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    It just means you are able to handle 25 lbs on a NS-8000. If you are able to offensive and defensive shots at all six corners consistently, you are very good.

    Quote Originally Posted by msl_turtle
    if now if i were to be able to hit for base to base just a slight movement with my wrist with a ns8k with string tension of 25lbs, do u think i have already "master" the use of the racket or other words ready for the racket??

    Pls give me your opinions.. tks

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