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  1. #35
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    Largely from the 21 points system, the game has evolved into players adapting to reduce mistakes but require explosiveness for sure kill points. Observe the new generation Chinese players adapting to this formula of conserving energy, placing shuttle back to apponent for him to commit errors and winning by capitalising opponents mistakes. I can see the Chinese paid attention to build their strength physically especially the legs. They hardly wear straps, guards or sustain injuries which is a new craft in their badminton armoury.

  2. #36
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    ...of course fitness counts. I can't think of any high level competitive sports that fitness is not necessary.

  3. #37
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    Something not mentioned and perhaps more applicable to less skillful players: Dont be predictable. Many players in the club I play in have some great shots but they use them time and time again from the same positions making it easy to anticipate and counter attack. The best player in our club (way stronger than me) once said that he finds me one of the toughest opponents to play against because he never knows what I am going to do. Unpredictability is surpisingly powerful.

  4. #38
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    I would say play crosscourt. For a majority of the time, play cross

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    Quote Originally Posted by renbo View Post
    I would say play crosscourt. For a majority of the time, play cross
    ...

    it depends on the situation, don't play crosscourt unless theres a open space and you're sure it'll do damage

    cross is always more difficult than straight, if you play cross, chances are your opponent would play it straight - much easier for them. And you'd be under his control. So if you play cross, must be a winner, or else you're playing your opponents game

  6. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Heong View Post
    ...

    it depends on the situation, don't play crosscourt unless theres a open space and you're sure it'll do damage

    cross is always more difficult than straight, if you play cross, chances are your opponent would play it straight - much easier for them. And you'd be under his control. So if you play cross, must be a winner, or else you're playing your opponents game
    Interesting comment. I usually cross back when opponent crosses. Crossing to me is more of opening up the rally. I play straight to speed things up; putting pressure on my opponent (and myself).

  7. #41
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    As the thread stipulates, this is tips for not so good players. So I would say that yes, cross is not always the best, but if we have to keep it simple, I would suggest to beginner - intermediate that they should think, most of the time, to play cross. Because their opponent won't, so the empty space would just be at that cross court space.

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    Quote Originally Posted by renbo View Post
    As the thread stipulates, this is tips for not so good players. So I would say that yes, cross is not always the best, but if we have to keep it simple, I would suggest to beginner - intermediate that they should think, most of the time, to play cross. Because their opponent won't, so the empty space would just be at that cross court space.
    So why not just say 'hit shuttle at the space'? Then it's simple and dynamic. Saying 'hit cross' is dumb when your opponent just hit cross and hasn't moved very far - then you're just hitting back to them.

  9. #43
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    for beginner tactical tips:

    use shot variation
    hit the spaces
    follow up smashes
    return to base
    control the net - play net shots!

  10. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by amleto View Post
    So why not just say 'hit shuttle at the space'? Then it's simple and dynamic. Saying 'hit cross' is dumb when your opponent just hit cross and hasn't moved very far - then you're just hitting back to them.

    Because, acc˘rding to my experience only fairly advanced players play cross court. Newbies don't. Another thing I have notice is a thing such as "hit shuttle at the space" takes many years to fathom. Beginners not so easily see and analyse the play. Hit cross court is way more effective.
    but a better tip for beginners would be to master the clear. If they can be comfortable with good and fast clears,, they'll win their match.

  11. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by renbo View Post
    Because, acc˘rding to my experience only fairly advanced players play cross court. Newbies don't. Another thing I have notice is a thing such as "hit shuttle at the space" takes many years to fathom. Beginners not so easily see and analyse the play. Hit cross court is way more effective.
    but a better tip for beginners would be to master the clear. If they can be comfortable with good and fast clears,, they'll win their match.
    I do notice this too..even though the terms should be "hit shuttle at the space" it came by experience and the more you play the better you are identifying open spaces (in seconds lol..you only have that much)

    but imo the most important is to keep the shuttle down as much as possible close to the net level and hit fast and accurate..again it came with practices but no matter how good your technique is if you keep "lob" the shuttle back it won't do any favor for you (it works for double too)

    Having said that few tips for beginners:
    1. footwork
    2. stamina
    3. defense
    4. control

    I tend to play defensive as beginners and let the opponent make mistakes. The more advance you are, the better your technique is, then you may start attacking..I find attacking is much harder unless you're taking advantage of their mistake i.e. easy smash or what not.
    Last edited by Ulzzang; 03-08-2013 at 10:41 AM.

  12. #46
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    Im not sure I agree with that completely.
    Hitting fast and flat in singles is potentially dangerous unless they are very accurate (close to the lines) or there is a lot of space to hit into (opponent way out of position). If all your opponent has to do is stick out his racquet and block it over the net then you are in trouble yourself. The same applies to smashing. In singles it must be very good smash otherwise you could be handing you opponent a relatively easy point if they manage to block it back over the net.
    I would say a having a good clear is essential in singles. You must be able to hit from the back to the back otherwise your opponent will soon realise that you cant, then push you to the back and wait mid / front court ready to murder your reply. Use the high clear when you are under pressure and need time to reset, and a lower fast punch clear when you spot the opportunity to put your opponent under pressure. In doubles its different because invariably one of you opponents is nearer the back waiting to smash any clear or lob. Even then, fast accurate punch clears to either corner can still be effective as your opponent is unlikely to be in a position to hit a good smash.
    In singles even at club level pushing your opponent into the read backhand corner (even with a clear) is an effective strategy as they generally dont have a decent backhand or round head reply if they arent quick enough to get there early and take it on the forehand.

  13. #47
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    For new players playing Singles, the most important thing to work on are consistency and quality of shots. Footwork practice is implied. I'm not sure if stamina is important at this stage, as rallies tend to be short due to unforced errors. By keeping your shots more consistent, in this game of attrition, you'd come out ahead most likely. Understanding margin of error would help consistency (i.e. do hit away from the middle, but not necessarily looking for the lines on sides or back). Quality of shots need to be at least reasonable, but don't go after perfection, which would lead to unforced errors.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Iammrlogic View Post
    Im not sure I agree with that completely.
    Hitting fast and flat in singles is potentially dangerous unless they are very accurate (close to the lines) or there is a lot of space to hit into (opponent way out of position). If all your opponent has to do is stick out his racquet and block it over the net then you are in trouble yourself.
    I'm not a Singles player myself. However, I attended all my kid's private lessons listening on the side.

    When you use fast and flat shots in Singles, you don't necessarily aim for the back line. The objective is to surprise your opponent, get the shuttle past him and deprive him of time to play a good shot back. If your flat shot is too low, of course, you could be creating troubles for yourself. There needs to be margin to ensure your opponent can't just raise the racket and block it.

    However, even in that case, there's still room for discussion and observation (during the game). If your opponent can't react fast enough (as in the case of beginners), even though they can reach your shots if they stretch, they won't be able to hit a good shots in return.

    So, in this sense, I think for this level of players, play more flatter shots would help, esp. when they only have limited power apparently, and shouldn't waste much of it on sending the shuttle sky high.

    In terms of Doubles, it's the same idea with the use of flat clear, as long as you don't use it all the time. In addition, an attacking clear to the middle could equally cause the confusion on your opponents' camp.

  15. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by raymond View Post
    ...... By keeping your shots more consistent, in this game of attrition, you'd come out ahead most likely. Understanding margin of error would help consistency (i.e. do hit away from the middle, but not necessarily looking for the lines on sides or back). Quality of shots need to be at least reasonable, but don't go after perfection, which would lead to unforced errors.
    unforced errors..... story of my life.

  16. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by raymond View Post
    I'm not a Singles player myself. However, I attended all my kid's private lessons listening on the side.

    When you use fast and flat shots in Singles, you don't necessarily aim for the back line. The objective is to surprise your opponent, get the shuttle past him and deprive him of time to play a good shot back. If your flat shot is too low, of course, you could be creating troubles for yourself. There needs to be margin to ensure your opponent can't just raise the racket and block it.

    However, even in that case, there's still room for discussion and observation (during the game). If your opponent can't react fast enough (as in the case of beginners), even though they can reach your shots if they stretch, they won't be able to hit a good shots in return.

    So, in this sense, I think for this level of players, play more flatter shots would help, esp. when they only have limited power apparently, and shouldn't waste much of it on sending the shuttle sky high.

    In terms of Doubles, it's the same idea with the use of flat clear, as long as you don't use it all the time. In addition, an attacking clear to the middle could equally cause the confusion on your opponents' camp.
    I would agree that if you dont have the power to clear properly then drives are the next best option as they cant be smashed. However, problems will occur if your opponent reaches it and pings it back just as fast. The shuttle is fizzing through your side again before you've had time to get into a good position on the court.
    I would definately say that drop shots should be a bit faster and flatter especially into the corners. Floaty drops give your opponent too much time to get there (and they are a lower percentage shot).

  17. #51
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    1. Footwork
    2. Stamina
    3. Techniques
    4. Control
    5. Shot variations
    6. X-Factor (no joke)

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