User Tag List

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 18 to 24 of 24
  1. #18
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Ottawa
    Posts
    1,110
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    One pedagogical tool that some coaches use is to imagine a rope between the partners. If the bird is lifted wide to one side, the net player moves over towards that side. If the bird is lifted deep, the net player moves back and covers midcourt.

    The further back the smasher hits from, the less angle and speed their shot has when it reaches the defender. The flatness makes it difficult to play a tight net return, but makes it quite easy to drive back a fast, flat shot. At all times the net player should be thinking "what is the easiest return for my opponent?" and move into position to take away that easy shot.


    Standing closer to the T when the bird is lifted deep also leaves a huge space between yourself and your partner. It should be fairly easy to get a fast flat shot past the net player, leaving the back player to cover a huge portion of the court. In that case, by the time the back player gets to that shot, it has dropped and he/she may no longer have an opportunity to hit it downwards.

  2. #19
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    sg
    Posts
    535
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Having watched a few of the WC2006 videos, i noticed that when channel attacking, for several pairs, eg: Chinese WD, the front player moves back further from the T than normal.

    I presume because that's because the front player's priority in channel attack is to drop back to prevent any chance of a cross-court reply, and that even takes priority over the chance of an easier net kill?

  3. #20
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Shanghai/London
    Posts
    364
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I'm not a coach and my positional play can be dire at times but one thing I have noticed with watching the professionals play is that, when attacking, the front player tends to stand a few steps behind the T and then moves forward when their partner smashes. Just about every pair I've ever seen does this and I after thinking about the reasons this is what I've come up with:

    1. Forward momentum - I guess it's easier to play a net kill with power if you are moving forward.
    2. If your partner doesn't smash but rather clears it's easier to move into a 'sides' position if you are behind the T. If you're on the T you have to move both sideways and backwards quite quickly which will be difficult to do.
    3. You're covering more of the court and asking your partner to do less work.

  4. #21
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    558
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Its a developing progress and double tatics have been changing over times..
    The traditional believe is the magic of the T which is a decent neutral way to play, but nowadays we have faster, stronger player and speedier racket, each player simply can actually cover more area so they can play smarter and be more interactive then before. Nowadays when double goes into attackig postion (front back) the net player would generally be more tilled to the side on covering the Straight line expecting a weak return to intercept. So the base position is no longer solid at the T spot anymore,
    and the reason why they take a step back from the T is because the net player nowadays actually cover any weak half court clear return as well.
    if u watch some tournment videos lately u'll notice u don't see as many
    instand kill smash anymore, instead most of the time the back guy's smash is to create opportunity for the front guy to intercept and pick out weak shots to win the point, playing the net guy simply is becoming more fun and exciting then ever

  5. #22
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Ottawa
    Posts
    1,110
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Umm... they played that way back in the day too! Things haven't changed that much.

  6. #23
    New Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    viet nam
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by Gollum
    The correct position is (b) standing 2/3 steps back off the T.


    I don't think that is a good position.

    If you stand at the T, you are only able to reach shots that come straight at you. You are not covering the court well: you are leaving empty spaces that the opponents can exploit to regain the attack (crosscourt drive returns will be their weapon of choice).

    One step in front of the T is crazy You will be completely out of the game. I see the weakest ladies do this in mixed doubles, and it drives me nuts.

    Your coach is right. You should stand at least a metre back from the T. This is better for several reasons:
    • When your partner smashes, you can attack drive returns. If you stand at the T, a crosscourt drive return will pass you, forcing your partner to lift (losing the attack).
    • If your partner smashes, you can still cover the net returns. Returns to the net are slower, so you have more time to move. Drive returns are faster.
    • You can move forwards into the net returns, rather than sideways. You will take the shuttle more in front of you (better), rather than at the side of you (worse).
    • You have a wider view of the court; you can see better, so you can respond better.
    • If your partner plays a dropshot, you will see it earlier and move in to the correct side.
    • If your partner plays a clear, you can step back much quicker into a defensive position.
    • If your partner is in trouble in a rearcourt corner, you can cover the other rearcourt corner for him. If the opponents lift to that corner after he smashes, then you will go there to continue the attack.
    The T is a court marking that applies to service only. It is not a mark that tells you where the net player should stand!

    Your position as the net player is not static. When your partner goes back to the rearcourt, you should come back away from the T. When he plays a dropshot, you follow it in and threaten the net reply. If the opponents lift from the net, you come back out again. Sometimes you even need to cover all three corners for your partner (he only covers his current rearcourt corner)!

    You may worry about the net returns to your partner's smashes. But remember: the closer the return is to the net, the slower it has to be. The crosscourt return might seem particularly troublesome, but it's easy if you are mentally ready for it. The crosscourt net return is the slowest to pass the net, so you have time to step in and attack it.
    Yes, So do I

  7. #24
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    558
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stumblingfeet
    Umm... they played that way back in the day too! Things haven't changed that much.
    back then as in 20+ yrs ago..
    atleast thats what i was taught back when i was like 10yrs old
    i could have been feed with wrong tatic about the T but thats what i
    told

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Similar Threads

  1. service in Mix doubles, girl in front blocking guy serving in the back
    By Capnx in forum Rules / Tournament Regulation / Officiating
    Replies: 8
    : 02-25-2012, 04:52 PM
  2. Doubles formation & movement
    By nprince in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 14
    : 02-27-2010, 05:08 AM
  3. how is the doubles rotation formation like?
    By ianboy in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 9
    : 10-04-2009, 04:52 AM
  4. Front or Back - Your Preference?
    By venkatesh in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 52
    : 11-03-2008, 03:49 AM
  5. Mixed doubles serving formation
    By FlowerPower in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 4
    : 10-03-2007, 06:07 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •