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  1. #1
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    Default Sport (Badminton) Assessment Task

    I study a course named Sport, Life & Recreation and I have been given an assessment to complete, which is coaching, there is a written component and practical component. I had chosen badminton as a sport.

    The written component requires me to write:

    -A brief history of the sport
    -Rules of the sport (i.e Badminton)
    -A lesson plan - including warm up, skills practice, fitness, game and cool down
    -Time management
    -The equipment needed for the session
    -Safety considerations

    The practical component will require me to basically to spend my allocated 45 minutes to simulate a badminton coaching session, including 5 minutes warmup as well as maintaining a professional attitude (How ?)


    Any contributions would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Regular Member Blurry D's Avatar
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    There is a lot of information in Wikipedia. Have a look there!! Also there are lots of book in the library that up want to go have a look/...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Blurry D
    There is a lot of information in Wikipedia. Have a look there!! Also there are lots of book in the library that up want to go have a look/...
    Been to Wikipedia, the whole point of this thread is to ask your version of the rules/equipment etc.

  4. #4
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    May I ask whether your course is from a university or sports institute?

    You must have played badminton for quite some time to want to attend this coaching course and now having to present it in theory and practice.

    Recently, 16-year old Manduki made a "Badminton Speech" (as posted in BC Forum) from which you can gather some information.

    And if you search under "coaching forum"/ "techniques & training", you may also find some of the things you need for your coaching assignment.

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    I got this article off this forum long time ago but I forget from whom. It should give a pretty clear idea as to the history of badminton.

    Wednesday December 8, 2004. The Star online
    The origins and growth of badminton

    By MICHELE LIAN
    Winning a game of badminton requires great speed, skill, power, sharp reflexes, endurance and a quick wit.

    Its rules are straightforward and simple, but the game’s origins are somewhat clouded in mystery and have been the subject of dispute.

    Historians say the game can be traced back to ancient China, Greece, Japan and India, and is directly descended from the primitive game of battledore and shuttlecock.

    But before battledore and shuttlecock, the Chinese played Ti Jian Zi, or shuttle-kicking, a game played with the feet.


    Badminton started out as a friendly, inter-party sport in Malaya after World War I, but gained popularity so rapidly that it challenged soccer as a mass sport.
    The shuttlecock was used, but it remains unclear whether it led to the game of battledore and shuttlecock, which was said to have been developed in Greece about 2,000 years ago.

    Battledore and shuttlecock were being played by peasants in England in the late 16th century, and by the upper class in Europe, where it was known by its French name, Jeu de Volant, by the 17th century.

    The game simply consisted of two players working together to keep a small, feathered cork – a shuttlecock – in the air for as long as possible by hitting it with a paddle, or battledore.

    It was also being played by children in India, and was picked up by British Army officers stationed there in the 1860s.

    The officers added a net and made the game a competitive sport called poona, complete with rules, which were said to be documented in 1867.

    The origin of the shuttlecock is not clear, although one theory suggests that corks were used to store feathers and the resulting object became a favourite for first throwing around and then batting.

    In 1973, the game made its way back to England where it was named “badminton”, after being introduced at Badminton House, the Duke of Beaufort’s residence in Gloucestershire, and in 1877, the first official rules of badminton were established by the Bath Badminton Club.

    Badminton gained popularity in England in the 1870s and 1880s, but only as a social pastime rather than a sport.

    In 1893, the Badminton Association of England was formed, and six years later, the first international badminton championship, the All-England Championship, was held.

    The worldwide popularity of badminton grew rapidly during the 20th century, with Denmark, the United States of America and Canada becoming devoted followers in the 1930s.

    The International Badminton Federation (IBF) was established in 1934 by founding members England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Denmark, Holland, Canada, New Zealand and France, with India joining as an affiliate in 1936. By then, the game was also growing in Malaya, Indonesia and Australia.

    Since then, Asian and South-East Asian countries, particularly China and Indonesia, have dominated the sport.

    Today, the IBF has more than 140 members worldwide.

    The rules of modern badminton is said to be similar to those of poona – it is a racket sport for two or four players, with two players for a singles, and four players for a doubles match.

    The aim of the game is to hit the shuttlecock using the racquet over the net and onto the court within the marked boundaries before your opponent can hit it back.

    Each time this is accomplished, the serving player or pair scores one point. After winning a point, the same player serves again, and continues to do so as long as they keep winning points.

    If the non-serving player or pair wins the rally (a series of shots interchanged between opposing players before a point is won), no point is earned. There is a change of server instead.

    In a doubles match, if a server loses the rally, the serve is switched to the opposing team. Both players in each team take turns serving before the serve switches back to their opponents.

    In a men’s singles match, the first player to score 15 points (11 for women) wins the game (there are usually two games in a match; if the result is tied after two games, a “rubber” set is played to decide the winner).

    If both sides score 14 points each (also called 14-all), or 10-all for women, the receiving side can choose to “set” or extend the game by three points. And so the first team to score 17 points (or 13 for the women) wins the game.

    Should the non-serving side choose not to set, the first team to score 15 (or 11) points wins the game.

    To play a badminton match, you need a court, racquet, shuttlecock and shoes that have good grip.

    Although a badminton court is smaller than a tennis court, the distance run by a player in a match is much further than that in tennis because of the speed of the game.

    Racquets vary according to their weight, type, strength, material and appearance. The frame is usually made of aluminium and graphite, while the strings are nylon and the shafts are aluminium, graphite or steel.

    The lighter the racquet, the faster it can swing.

    The shuttlecock or shuttle, is made from nylon or feathers. The most costly shuttlecock to use in a tournament is one that is made of goose feather, which has 14 to 16 feathers and weighs about five grams.

    Badminton became an Olympic sport in 1992 at the Barcelona Games, where Indonesia dominated the event, winning gold medals in the men’s and women’s singles and doubles, and mixed doubles.

    Apart from Indonesia, the sport has also garnered a cult following in Malaysia, China and South Korea.

    Malaysian fans are known to take two shirts – one light-coloured and the other dark – to matches.

    Because the colour of the background is important (with its white shuttlecock flying about) during a badminton match, the fans wear their dark-coloured clothes when their preferred player is facing them, and the light-coloured shirt when the opponent is facing them.

    Badminton started out as a friendly, inter-party sport in Malaya after World War I, but gained popularity so rapidly that it challenged soccer as a mass sport. It also had a large following in Singapore and by the 1930s, at least 50 badminton parties had been formed.

    It was Selangor which organised the first formal state championship in 1929.

    The winner, A.S. Samuel, funded his own trip to England in 1939 to compete in the All-England Championship. There, he made it to the semi-finals.

    Fellow Malaysian Eddy Choong (now Datuk Eddy Choong) competed in 12 All-England Championship finals and won four singles matches back to back in 1953, 1954, 1956 and 1957, making him a badminton legend. He also won in the doubles category with his brother David Choong, for three consecutive years from 1951 to 1953.

    Malaysia (known as Malaya back then), led by players Wong Peng Soon and Ong Poh Lim, took part in the first Thomas Cup tournament – the men’s world badminton championship – at the Queen’s Hall in England in 1949 and won by defeating Denmark eight to one in the finals.

    Since then, Malaysia won the Cup four more times – in 1952, 1955, 1967 and 1992. Malaysia has yet to win the Uber Cup, the women’s world badminton championship.

    At the Olympics, Rashid Sidek won the country’s first bronze medal in the men’s singles category in 1996.

    That same year, Cheah Soon Kit and Yap Kim Hock, and Jalani Sidek and Razif Sidek won the silver and bronze medals respectively in the men’s doubles.

    At the 2000 Olympics in Sydney, Choong Tan Fook and Lee Wan Wah earned fourth place in the men’s doubles.

  6. #6
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    Thanks manduki, that was some detailed info there.

    And Loh, I happen to be a senior high school student.

  7. #7
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    Yes, nice article, indeed!

    Alright! Another high school student!

  8. #8
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    In Singapore, we hardly use the term "high school", or "senior high school".

    Our educational system is as follows:

    Age/School

    1) 6 to 11/12 : Primary School (6 years)

    2) 12/13 to 16/17: Secondary School (4 years)

    3) 16/17 to 18/19: Junior College (2 years for students who want to enter university to get a degree), Or

    4) 16/17 to 19/20: Polytechnics (3 years for those who want to obtain a diploma and get a job first or go for further studies at a university)

    5) 18/19 to 21/22: University (3 or 4 years for a first degree and 5 years for Medicine)

    But all Male Singaporeans and Permanent Residents must do about 2 years of military service (National Service) before they are allowed to enter university unless they have been given prior exemption. All girls are exempted from NS.



    What is your country's equivalent?
    Last edited by Loh; 11-12-2006 at 10:32 PM.

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    1) 5 to 11 Elementary School

    2) 12 to 14 Middle School (Junior High School)

    3) 15 to 18 High School

    4) 19 to 21 Community College (For those that want cheaper education or did not qualify for a higher-level college, they can get their basic credits for the first two years here, and transfer to

    5) 19 to 22 University, College

    6) 22 to 24 Master's Degree (For those that want to improve even more in their major) or

    7) 22 to 26 PHD (Doctors and others that need higher training or wish to make further progress in their field through this)

  10. #10
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    1) Primary School

    Typical Age Group: 5-11
    Grades: K (Kindergarten) - 6

    2) Junior High (Secondary) School

    Typical Age Group: 12 - 15
    Grades: 7 - 10

    3) Senior High (Secondary) School

    Typical Age Group: 16 - 18
    Grades: 11 - 12

    Then you go on to a tertiary institution such as university .....

    I'm a senior high school student as you see, I barely know any details regarding university study. Usually, the junior and senior secondary grades are in the same high school and we say primary school instead of elementary.
    Last edited by f3nr15; 11-13-2006 at 07:06 PM.

  11. #11
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Thanks Hiroisuke for your information.

    Yes we also have Masters and PhDs and other post-graduate programmes for those who wish to further their studies and specialisations.

    Since Singapore is a small country we have only a few local universities, although some more may be set up later. They are:

    1. National University of Singapore (NUS formerly known as University of Singapore, the oldest university in Singapore - 100 years old)

    2. Nanyang Technological University (NTU formerly known as Nanyang University which catered to students from Southeast Asia who are educated in Mandarin (Chinese) and less fluent in English. However, NTU is now catered to mainly English stream students. But the majority of students in Singapore now are effectively bilingual in English and Chinese.)

    3. Singapore Management University (SMU, relatively new but already acquired a good reputation. Students are 'specially' selected to ascertain whether they are good enough to be developed further as leaders of industry. Our BFer, Magical Pheonix is an undergraduate. )

    4. Singapore Institute of Management (SIM, used to conduct management, sales and marketing and other relevant courses part-time for working adults. Has recently been granted full university status in view of its long and vast experience and its association with well-known universities in the world. Still conducts part time course as well as full time.

    5. Yong Siew Toh Conservatory of Music (a relatively new music conservatory catering to not only Singaporeans but also other talented musicians in the region, including China. It is part of the NUS and it recently moved to its brand new home within the NUS campus. In June 2006, Daniel Aw, a 25-year old Singaporean was the first graduate in the bassoon with first class honours.)

    Apart from the above, we have some other reputable institutions, as follows, which award diplomas in the arts. Graduates can go on to obtain degrees with accredited universities in other parts the world.

    1. Laselle-SIA College of Arts
    2. NAFA (Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts)

    And even in the Secondary Schools, we will nurture and develop talented students not only in sports (Singapore Sports School) but also in Arts and Music. The schools for the latter two will come onstream soon.

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