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  1. #1
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    Default Why you should try playing at very high tension

    If you follow badminton trends closely, you will observe that top players have over the last few years been playing at higher and higher tension. Tensions in the range of 20-26lbs and those above 26 to 36lbs are worlds apart from each other. The lower tension most of us use, I suspect, is more in line with the stores' as well as the racquet manufacturers' preferred tension when stringing your racquet, to avoid possible claims. It also suits the stores' quicker stringing turnaround. What suits them do not necessarily suit us.
    I have of late started stringing at the 30lbs range on all sorts of racquets, and the results are quite interesting. Briefly, most of then have discovered that very high tension takes them to another world. You have to try it once to find out what you have been missing.
    Recently I strung two racquets at the 30lbs range for Inskysport to try them out with some badminton coaches. I was surprised that not one of them has ever tried playing at this high tension before. Needless to say, the results and feedback came as a eye-opener for Inskysport, so much so it is now offering very high tension stringing, using conventional 2-point machines suitably modified to 4-point ones.
    So what are waiting for?

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    Taneepak, I wish you were in Canada. Here in Montreal, not store will accept to string racquet at 30 lbs.

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    Well, the chance for racket breakage is also higher, and that's why I will not go for it. Plus, I wonder what's human's limit on the tension? 30? 35? 40? Sooner or later, human beings are going to hit the upper limit of the tension.

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    How do you even put a measurement unit on human tension, jeff? 30, 40, 50? In badminton, I think it can be RBT or raquet breakage threshold.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brave_Turtle
    Taneepak, I wish you were in Canada. Here in Montreal, not store will accept to string racquet at 30 lbs.
    Maybe here is one area you can do something about it. Why not buy the cheapest 6-point 10 support stringing machine and start stringing for your friends at high tension. The machine will pay for itself in no time. You can also throw in a warranty too for racquets strung up to 32lbs. For the warranty, you can charge maybe 5% more.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bluejeff
    Well, the chance for racket breakage is also higher, and that's why I will not go for it. Plus, I wonder what's human's limit on the tension? 30? 35? 40? Sooner or later, human beings are going to hit the upper limit of the tension.
    That was the same concern Ah Tung of Inskysport had when I brought up this same topic with him. He sounded dismissive initially and doubted it could be done with, yes, warranty. He is now singing a different tune. Now if Inskysport is 'pushed' into very high tension stringing, you can bet your bottom dollar that Mr Ng of Luxis will be the next to follow. In time to come it will be standard practice amongst the more 'specialist' stores in Hong Kong.

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    Has anyone tried stringing 30 lbs on Ti-8? I'm wondering if it breaks or not. And, what's the recommended string? BG-66? Thanks.

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    Default Questions

    Mr Taneepak,

    1) Are there any strings could hold this tension that you could recommand?
    2) Do you have to pre-stretch these strings differently?

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    I think the advice given by tannepak isn't back up with specific and can be dangerous to some users.

    1. why are their 'experienced' coaches trying high tension now?
    2. elaborate on 'eye opening' experience. Premature popping a string also give me the eye opening experience
    3. yonex dont warranty tension outside spec, NO MATTER HOW MANY POINTS MACHINE U R USING NOR HOW MANY CERTIFICATION THAT STRINGER HAS. You have to deal with that shop.


    If and when Ah Tung of Inskysport stop singing this tune, please inform this forum as to that time.
    Last edited by cooler; 03-23-2005 at 11:45 AM.

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    Default Seen it before

    I have to add that I had seen more than one high level players based in BC, Canada strung their racquets at over 26lbs. One of them a lady who played for the Olympics in badminton represented Canada. I have never tried until I got my MP77 2U which I strung at 26lbs. Now, I'm playing with 26lbs using BG65 with my MP77 for over a year now, no problem.

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    Hi Taneepak,

    What stringing machine do you recommend? I am think about buying one. Thanks!

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    I think Canada, with it's cold weather, isn't really suitable to have high stringing tensions. The strings become tighter at low temperatures, which can be a problem in cold gyms, and also while travelling to the gym.

    I don't think high tension is a good idea among the non-pro players. A racket becomes less durable in a clash with higher tension. Also, the string will also break more frequently. Whether you string yourself, or pay to get it strung, it will cost money/time either way. And you can not make the stringer compensate for damage while stringing at high tension.

    I don't see the need to take unnecessary risks with high tension. Hopefully this thread isn't an attempt to boost racket sales(from rackets breaking) or stringing jobs(from strings breaking)

  13. #13
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    i do agree that high tension have its benefits, afterall, most pro players strings at around that tension. however, we must also becareful not to blindly suggest high tension to everyone. the lack of damping in high tension stringbed makes a harsh impact on the arm.

    as an analogy, high tension is like a sports car with a stiff suspension, if you drive it on a bumpy road, sooner or later all the screws in your car (and you) will fall off. lower tension is like a plush sedan with softer suspension, it can go over bump with less impact on the car and passenger.

    i have used high tension and every time i finish with it, my arm usually feel more pain. professional and advance players can take it because they have better techniques and strength.

    so if you are a beginner or lower intermediate, i do not suggest you go into high tension.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheGr8Two
    I think Canada, with it's cold weather, isn't really suitable to have high stringing tensions. The strings become tighter at low temperatures, which can be a problem in cold gyms, and also while travelling to the gym.

    I don't think high tension is a good idea among the non-pro players. A racket becomes less durable in a clash with higher tension. Also, the string will also break more frequently. Whether you string yourself, or pay to get it strung, it will cost money/time either way. And you can not make the stringer compensate for damage while stringing at high tension.

    I don't see the need to take unnecessary risks with high tension. Hopefully this thread isn't an attempt to boost racket sales(from rackets breaking) or stringing jobs(from strings breaking)
    You play in cold gyms? I don't lol. Play in summer I guess, summer is always hot =D

    There's probably a reason for a thermal bag....



    --------------------------------------------------------------

    I wanna try a 26lb racquet as much as everyone else does. But chances are that it'll bend or break before you do anything with it

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    Quote Originally Posted by kwun
    i do agree that high tension have its benefits, afterall, most pro players strings at around that tension. however, we must also becareful not to blindly suggest high tension to everyone. the lack of damping in high tension stringbed makes a harsh impact on the arm.

    as an analogy, high tension is like a sports car with a stiff suspension, if you drive it on a bumpy road, sooner or later all the screws in your car (and you) will fall off. lower tension is like a plush sedan with softer suspension, it can go over bump with less impact on the car and passenger.

    i have used high tension and every time i finish with it, my arm usually feel more pain. professional and advance players can take it because they have better techniques and strength.

    so if you are a beginner or lower intermediate, i do not suggest you go into high tension.
    What Kwun said stands to reason and I agree with him on this point. Having said that my recommendation is that those interested should try different tensions. This will allow them over time to find and settle down on their own preferred tension...and stick to it. It is unwise to use rackets of differing tensions. They tend to throw your game out...and all you get is frustration rather than enjoyment.

  16. #16
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    The pain usually comes from the elbow.

    Professional players do lots of weight training to strengthen their joints in order to withstand the repeated stress. Remember very high-tension stringbed requires very fast racquet speed.

    Quote Originally Posted by kwun

    i have used high tension and every time i finish with it, my arm usually feel more pain. professional and advance players can take it because they have better techniques and strength.

    so if you are a beginner or lower intermediate, i do not suggest you go into high tension.

  17. #17
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    Huh? What does strength have to do with high tension?

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