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  1. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by silentheart
    I just started another thread in Shuttle forum. Let the party start!!!
    Yup I posted my response there.

    Cooler, you can reply back on the new one.

    Thanks.

  2. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt
    I thought the international is correct because you did say lower number the slower, and that is what appears to be in there. So what would be the correct list of Yonex rating it's equivalency with the grain rating?

    I do know Yonex 4 = Speed 78 (ie. Victor Champ #1) for sure as I've seen at the local shop here.

    Thanks
    well, ur right here, i speed read that link
    we use speed 0 here, but prefer speed 00 but that's only for by special request.

  3. #37
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    Funny HAHA!!! But it is true, Panda does like beer.

  4. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete LSD
    So who's actually sober? I am still suffering the after effects of two bottles of red wine!!!
    Hey! you guys got a nice party going (without me ).

    Two bottles of red wine! . Man, I know how one bottle of red wine feels like , I can only imagine how two may feel the next day. Hope they were not high on tannins!

  5. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by jerby
    I must be in the wrong place...

    though I distinctly remember clicking on "string tension and temperature change"

    though, to strick to the current 'topic' I remeber from chemistry gasses get more dense when they cool down...(try cooling down water vapor)

    exception is, offcourse, water. if you freeze water it gets less dense, but this is because it forms hydrogyn-bridges...the molucules stand further apart.

    I think humidity is the key factor, because 'hot air' absorbs more moisture...wait, that might make it more dense...hmmm, how contradicting
    Actually humidity makes the air less dense (assuming the temperature remains the same) I think as H2O is lighter than Nitrogen (which makes up a lot of our normail air). So, if the temperature is the same, the ball/shuttle will go farther if the humidity is higher. One thing different is if the air has actual water molecules in liquid form (like when its drizzling), then the air would be heavier than otherwise. Atleast thats what I remember when I was reading about how golf balls will react to different weather conditions...

  6. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by BaddGolfer
    Actually humidity makes the air less dense (assuming the temperature remains the same) I think as H2O is lighter than Nitrogen (which makes up a lot of our normail air). So, if the temperature is the same, the ball/shuttle will go farther if the humidity is higher. One thing different is if the air has actual water molecules in liquid form (like when its drizzling), then the air would be heavier than otherwise. Atleast thats what I remember when I was reading about how golf balls will react to different weather conditions...
    ur correct because MW of O2 and N2 is > H2O.

    HOWEVER, I don't understand this in real life: For example, taken right now, the weather of vancouver and calgary :

    Vancouver
    Currently
    Observed at: Vancouver Int'l Airport
    12:00 PM PST Tuesday 26 December 2006
    Cloudy
    Temperature 6C
    Pressure/ Tendency 100.6 kPa↓
    Visibility 32 km
    Humidity 91 % Dewpoint 5C

    Calgary
    Currently
    Observed at: Calgary Int'l Airport
    2:00 PM MST Tuesday 26 December 2006
    Mainly Sunny
    Temperature 5C
    Pressure/ Tendency 100.8 kPa↓
    Visibility 64 km
    Humidity 30 %
    Dewpoint -11C

    i dont understand why vancouver uses 77-78 speed while calgary uses 74-75 shuttle speed.
    Last edited by cooler; 12-26-2006 at 03:48 PM.

  7. #41
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    Cooler, Thats one of the things that bugged me as well for a while. I think the pressure listed by the weather reports is not the absolute pressure at a particular location, but one that is "reduced" to mean sea level... Atleast thats what I understand from this ...

    "Mean sea level pressure (MSLP or QFF) is the pressure at sea level or (when measured at a given elevation on land) the station pressure reduced to sea level assuming an isothermal layer at the station temperature.

    This is the pressure normally given in weather reports on radio, television, and newspapers. When barometers in the home are set to match the local weather reports, they measure pressure reduced to sea level, not the actual local atmospheric pressure. See Altimeter (barometer vs. absolute).

    The reduction to sea level means that the normal range of fluctuations in pressure is the same for everyone. The pressures which are considered high pressure or low pressure do not depend on geographical location. This makes isobars on a weather map meaningful and useful tools."



    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atmospheric_pressure

    The same report is saying the pressure at an altitude of 5486m is 1/2 of 1 Atmosphere. You can guess what the absolute pressure will be in Calgary which is I think is around 1000m elevation.
    Last edited by BaddGolfer; 12-26-2006 at 04:33 PM.

  8. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by silentheart
    Funny HAHA!!! But it is true, Panda does like beer.
    What duh?! NGP doesn't like beer, he prefers Hong Kong Milk Tea...with his Cab 20 Tour and MP string at 75F.

  9. #43
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    Woo-Hoo! It's much nicer in Los Angeles :

    And we use 77 speed shuttles for the most part.

    Current conditions as of 2:47 pm PST: Fair
    Temp: 72
    Feels Like: 72
    High: 72
    Low: 50
    Barometer: 30.06 in and falling
    Humidity: 25%
    Visibility: 8 miles
    Dewpoint:34
    Wind: Calm
    Sunrise: 6:57 am
    Sunset: 4:50 pm

    Quote Originally Posted by cooler
    Vancouver
    Currently
    Observed at: Vancouver Int'l Airport
    12:00 PM PST Tuesday 26 December 2006
    Cloudy
    Temperature 6C
    Pressure/ Tendency 100.6 kPa↓
    Visibility 32 km
    Humidity 91 % Dewpoint 5C

    Calgary
    Currently
    Observed at: Calgary Int'l Airport
    2:00 PM MST Tuesday 26 December 2006
    Mainly Sunny
    Temperature 5C
    Pressure/ Tendency 100.8 kPa↓
    Visibility 64 km
    Humidity 30 %
    Dewpoint -11C

    i dont understand why vancouver uses 77-78 speed while calgary uses 74-75 shuttle speed.

  10. #44
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    I don't understand too. That is so weird.

  11. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by BaddGolfer
    Cooler, Thats one of the things that bugged me as well for a while. I think the pressure listed by the weather reports is not the absolute pressure at a particular location, but one that is "reduced" to mean sea level... Atleast thats what I understand from this ...

    "Mean sea level pressure (MSLP or QFF) is the pressure at sea level or (when measured at a given elevation on land) the station pressure reduced to sea level assuming an isothermal layer at the station temperature.

    This is the pressure normally given in weather reports on radio, television, and newspapers. When barometers in the home are set to match the local weather reports, they measure pressure reduced to sea level, not the actual local atmospheric pressure. See Altimeter (barometer vs. absolute).

    The reduction to sea level means that the normal range of fluctuations in pressure is the same for everyone. The pressures which are considered high pressure or low pressure do not depend on geographical location. This makes isobars on a weather map meaningful and useful tools."



    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atmospheric_pressure

    The same report is saying the pressure at an altitude of 5486m is 1/2 of 1 Atmosphere. You can guess what the absolute pressure will be in Calgary which is I think is around 1000m elevation.
    AH I SEE. Thanks, u solved this riddle of mine which had bugged me for a long while. This barometric thingy (not metric at all) is meant for weatherman making their little isobar map. It is a calculated number , NOT MEASURED.

    "imagine if each stations bored a hole straight down to sea level, lowered their pressure sensing device to the bottom of the hole, and obtained readings. This is the sea level barometer."

    so, reading barometric pressure has less meaning to me now. It explains why before i keep seeing vancouver and calgary pressure are so similar, and often calgary barometric pressure is even higher than vancouver but yet van. is at sea level. The confusing part weather report listed them as 'Pressure', and not barometric pressure. Barometric pressure is quite useless for the average joe public.
    Last edited by cooler; 12-26-2006 at 08:37 PM.

  12. #46
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    Discounting altitude and humidity the lower the ambient temperature the more dense the air (also more oxygen). The lower the shuttle rating number the slower or lighter the shuttle. That is why a 76 or 77 shuttle is suitable for Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, but not suitable for say Sweden in winter. In hot countries, where the air is less dense a lower rating or slower shuttle, like 76, is suitable because the less dense air allows the shuttle to travel through the air faster than would be the case in Sweden in winter.
    To overcome the more dense air in cold countries, you need a higher rating, which also means a heavier, shuttle to push through the denser air.
    Matt has the air density in cold/hot countries the wrong way round. If shuttle manufacturers were to distribute the different ratings of shuttles according to his air density/shuttle rating, they will be out of business.
    This is why all land speed records for cars are always held in hot locations. You need the less dense air, which far outweighs the more oxygen advantage of denser air in cold locations, to propel the car faster. The shuttles rating system works on the same principle.

  13. #47
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    Discounting altitude and humidity the lower the ambient temperature the more dense the air (also more oxygen). The lower the shuttle rating number the slower or lighter the shuttle. That is why a 76 or 77 shuttle is suitable for Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, but not suitable for say Sweden in winter. In hot countries, where the air is less dense a lower rating or slower shuttle, like 76, is suitable because the less dense air allows the shuttle to travel through the air faster than would be the case in Sweden in winter.
    To overcome the more dense air in cold countries, you need a higher rating, which also means a heavier, shuttle to push through the denser air.
    Matt has the air density in cold/hot countries the wrong way round. If shuttle manufacturers were to distribute the different ratings of shuttles according to his air density/shuttle rating, they will be out of business.
    This is why all land speed records for cars are always held in hot locations. You need the less dense air, which far outweighs the more oxygen advantage of denser air in cold locations, to propel the car faster. The shuttles rating system works on the same principle.

  14. #48
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    Discounting altitude and humidity the lower the ambient temperature the more dense the air (also more oxygen). The lower the shuttle rating number the slower or lighter the shuttle. That is why a 76 or 77 shuttle is suitable for Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, but not suitable for say Sweden in winter. In hot countries, where the air is less dense a lower rating or slower shuttle, like 76, is suitable because the less dense air allows the shuttle to travel through the air faster than would be the case in Sweden in winter.
    To overcome the more dense air in cold countries, you need a higher rating, which also means a heavier, shuttle to push through the denser air.
    Matt has the air density in cold/hot countries the wrong way round. If shuttle manufacturers were to distribute the different ratings of shuttles according to his air density/shuttle rating, they will be out of business.
    This is why all land speed records for cars are always held in hot locations. You need the less dense air, which far outweighs the more oxygen advantage of denser air in cold locations, to propel the car faster. The shuttles rating system works on the same principle.

  15. #49
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    lol tanepeak, you had to post it 3 times?

    As I said it's not mine my rating system.

    I still have not gotten an explaination why speed 78 flies noticably slower in warm air at the temp when the facility raised up the temperature, then compared to when it's at the normal cooler temperature when it does fly at the proper speed. That's pretty much the piece I'm most interested in. This is because is a counter example where the proper rating system does not explain.

    I also think of it in F1 perspective. More down force the car has, the slower the car would be because there is more weight generated, with increased drag which results in a lower top speed. With less down force, the car will be faster because of less weight generation and it can obtain a higher top speed.
    Last edited by Matt; 12-26-2006 at 09:45 PM.

  16. #50
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    Discounting altitude and humidity the lower the ambient temperature the more dense the air (also more oxygen). The lower the shuttle rating number the slower or lighter the shuttle. That is why a 76 or 77 shuttle is suitable for Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, but not suitable for say Sweden in winter. In hot countries, where the air is less dense a lower rating or slower shuttle, like 76, is suitable because the less dense air allows the shuttle to travel through the air faster than would be the case in Sweden in winter.
    To overcome the more dense air in cold countries, you need a higher rating, which also means a heavier, shuttle to push through the denser air.
    Matt has the air density in cold/hot countries the wrong way round. If shuttle manufacturers were to distribute the different ratings of shuttles according to his air density/shuttle rating, they will be out of business.
    This is why all land speed records for cars are always held in hot locations. You need the less dense air, which far outweighs the more oxygen advantage of denser air in cold locations, to propel the car faster. The shuttles rating system works on the same principle.

  17. #51
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    Spam! postings from tanepak!

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