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  1. #1
    Regular Member DinkAlot's Avatar
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    Default Exercises to Rehab Jumper's Knee (Patellar Tendonitis)

    Source: www.jumpusa.com newsletter dated April 5, 2007.

    Exercises to Rehab Jumpers Knee (Patellar Tendonitis)

    What is patellar tendonitis?
    The patellar tendon connects the kneecap (the patella) to the shin bone. This is part of the 'extensor mechanism' of the knee, and together with the quadriceps muscle and the quadriceps tendon, these structures allow your knee to straighten out, and provide strength for this motion. The patellar tendon, like other tendons, is made of tough string-like bands. These bands are surrounded by a vascular tissue lining that provides nutrition to the tendon.

    What causes patellar tendonitis?
    Patellar tendonitis is the condition that arises when the tendon and the tissues that surround it, become inflamed and irritated. This is usually due to overuse, especially from jumping activities. This is the reason patellar tendonitis is often called "jumper's knee."
    orthopedics.about.com


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The following information is approved and/or reviewed by U-Michigan Health System providers but it is not a tool for self-diagnosis or a substitute for medical treatment. You should speak to your physician or if you have questions or concerns about this information or your medical condition.

    You can do the hamstring stretch right away. When the pain in your knee has decreased, you can do the quadriceps stretch and start strengthening the thigh muscles using the rest of the exercises.

    Standing hamstring stretch: Place the heel of your leg on a stool about 15 inches high. Keep your knee straight. Lean forward, bending at the hips until you feel a mild stretch in the back of your thigh. Make sure you do not roll your shoulders and bend at the waist when doing this or you will stretch your lower back instead. Hold the stretch for 15 to 30 seconds. Repeat 3 times.

    Quadriceps stretch: Stand an arm's length away from the wall, facing straight ahead. Brace yourself by keeping the hand on the uninjured side against the wall. With your other hand, grasp the ankle of the injured leg and pull your heel toward your buttocks. Don't arch or twist your back and keep your knees together. Hold this stretch for 15 to 30 seconds. Repeat 3 times.

    Side-lying leg lift: Lying on your uninjured side, tighten the front thigh muscles on your injured leg and lift that leg 8 to 10 inches away from the other leg. Keep the leg straight. Do 3 sets of 10.
    Quadriceps isometrics: Sitting on the floor with your injured leg straight and your other leg bent, press the back of your knee into the floor by tightening the muscles on the top of your thigh. Hold this position 10 seconds. Relax. Do 3 sets of 10.

    Straight leg raise: Lie on your back with your legs straight out in front of you. Tighten up the top of your thigh muscle on the injured leg and lift that leg about 8 inches off the floor, keeping the thigh muscle tight throughout. Slowly lower your leg back down to the floor. Do 3 sets of 10.

    Step-up: Stand with the foot of your injured leg on a support (like a block of wood) 3 to 5 inches high. Keep your other foot flat on the floor. Shift your weight onto the injured leg and straighten the knee as the uninjured leg comes off the floor. Lower your uninjured leg to the floor slowly. Do 3 sets of 10.
    Wall squat with a ball: Stand with your back, shoulders, and head against a wall and look straight ahead. Keep your shoulders relaxed and your feet 1 foot away from the wall and a shoulder's width apart. Place a rolled up pillow or a soccer-sized ball between your thighs. Keeping your head against the wall, slowly squat while squeezing the pillow or ball at the same time. Squat down until you are almost in a sitting position. Your thighs will not yet be parallel to the floor. Hold this position for 10 seconds and then slowly slide back up the wall. Make sure you keep squeezing the pillow or ball throughout this exercise. Repeat 10 times. Build up to 3 sets of 10.

    Knee stabilization: Wrap a piece of elastic tubing around the ankle of your uninjured leg. Tie the tubing to a table or other fixed object.
    Stand on your injured leg facing the table and bend your knee slightly, keeping your thigh muscles tight. While maintaining this position, move your uninjured leg straight back behind you. Do 3 sets of 10.
    Turn 90 so your injured leg is closest to the table. Move your uninjured leg away from your body. Do 3 sets of 10.
    Turn 90 again so your back is to the table. Move your uninjured leg straight out in front of you. Do 3 sets of 10.
    Turn your body 90 again so your uninjured leg is closest to the table. Move your uninjured leg across your body. Do 3 sets of 10.
    Hold onto a chair if you need help balancing. This exercise can be made even more challenging by standing on a pillow while you move your uninjured leg.

    Resisted knee extension: Make a loop from a piece of elastic tubing by tying it around the leg of a table or other fixed object. Step into the loop so the tubing is around the back of your injured leg. Lift your uninjured foot off the ground. Hold onto a chair for balance, if needed.
    Bend your knee about 45 degrees.
    Slowly straighten your leg, keeping your thigh muscle tight as you do this.
    Do this 10 times. Do 3 sets. An easier way to do this is to perform this exercise while standing on both legs.

  2. #2
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    I do most of these... but there are some great new ones.

    THANK YOU SO MUCH!!!

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    thanks dink!!! gonna be of great use to me... got any for shin splints?

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    Quote Originally Posted by drowsysmurf
    thanks dink!!! gonna be of great use to me... got any for shin splints?
    For me shin splints was really assisted by use of a balance board... first just trying to balanceon it fo rthirty seconds, and once I was able to do that, squatting on it.

    Also, eccentric training for your calves to strengthen them. So stand on a step, put your heel down with one foot, then use both feet to bring your heel up.

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    what's a balance board? i can't picture the one about the steps... got more explanations?

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    the one that worked the most for me was using the styrofoam cylinder to stretch my IT band.

  7. #7
    Regular Member ctjcad's Avatar
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    Smile Nice and comprehensive article..

    Quote Originally Posted by DinkAlot
    Source: www.jumpusa.com newsletter dated April 5, 2007.

    Exercises to Rehab Jumpers Knee (Patellar Tendonitis)

    What causes patellar tendonitis?
    Patellar tendonitis is the condition that arises when the tendon and the tissues that surround it, become inflamed and irritated. This is usually due to overuse, especially from jumping activities. This is the reason patellar tendonitis is often called "jumper's knee."
    orthopedics.about.com
    ..good info to share with us all ..Although, i think, eventhough patellar tendonitis is somewhat related to badminton, personally i think it's caused more with the lunging, bending(getting to those drops) and sometimes "overused" of the knees, esp. the right knee, if one is a right-handed player, more so than by jumping and landing..After a period of time, the "abuse" of our knees will take its toll..
    Last edited by ctjcad; 04-08-2007 at 08:20 PM.

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    Thanks alot! I really needed it

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