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  1. #1
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    Default Strategies for singles/ doubles

    Hey Guys...Don't really know where to put this thread..so i'll put it here...

    Q:1) What are the key points for playing singles.

    Q:2) What are the key points for playing doubles?

  2. #2
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    Default

    SMASH!!!!!!!!!
    is the way.

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    Default

    Did you do a search?

  4. #4
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    Default Best Strategies for Singles and Doubles Play

    I found this on www.badminton-information.com but i'll cut and paste anyways...

    I would like to have a discussion on this...

    PLEASE PUT CONSTRUCTIVE COMMENTS...

    Singles Badminton Strategies




    One simple badminton strategy often used in singles is to serve long and high to your opponent’s back court. This will force your opponent to move back to the baseline and open up his forecourt.
    Throw in some disguised low serve occasionally and you might just catch your opponent off guard and win a point outright.
    Nowadays in professional men’s singles, you seldom see them use the long serve. This is because the professional players are extremely athletic and possess great techniques. They can jump really high and smash powerfully even from the baseline.
    It all depends who you are playing with. If the high serve turns out to be your opponent’s favorite and put you under pressure, use the low serve.
    Always try to hit the shuttle away from your opponent and make your opponent move around the court. One exception to this rule is that when you encounter a tall opponent, you might want to smash straight to his body to gain an advantage.
    Observe your opponent’s strength, weakness, favorite shots and pattern of play. Use it to your advantage.
    Your aim is to make your opponent play a weak return, such as a weak backhand shot from the back court. If your plan works and forces a mistake or a poor return which you can make a ‘kill’, use it again. If it is not working then have the courage to make changes. The key is to be flexible.
    If you are in a difficult situation in the game and your opponent is not, you need to make time for yourself to get back to a favorable position. Do this by hitting the shuttle high towards the back of the court, preferably near the middle of the baseline. Your opponent will find it difficult to catch you out with acute angled returns from there.
    Remember always to get back to your base position in the midcourt area after making each shot. This is a position where you can possibly reach any of your opponent’s shots.
    Doubles Badminton Strategies


    In doubles play, the tactic is to serve low so that the serving side would not be placed in a defensive position. If you are serving low, take position on the front and part of the midcourt area immediately. Your partner shall then cover the back court. This is known as the Attacking Formation (Front–Back).





    You can also use the flick serve to prevent your opponent from rushing to the net. But you and your partner will have to take up a defensive position standing side by side. This is known as the Defensive Formation (side-side).





    When you defend, try to hit the shuttle deep into your opponent’s court. This is to prevent your opponent in the front position intercepting the shuttle from mid to front court.

    When a chance presents itself, push or drive the shuttle to the area in between your opponents. Or make a return to the front court of your opponents, forcing them to lift the shuttle.
    In this instance, the player who played that shot will have to take up the front position immediately while the partner takes the back. An attacking formation shall be formed. If you are taking the back position, your aim is to make shots that can create openings for your partner to ‘kill’ in the front court.
    In all types of doubles play, teamwork is the key in forming a formidable partnership. Although an ideal player will be skillful in all areas of the court, most will either show greater flair around the net or be more effective with overhead shots.
    You and your partner have to figure out how to make the best out of your skills together. Play to your own strengths and your opponent’s weaknesses.
    You will find this much easier if you communicate well with each other. Do not leave it to guesswork! Talk to your partner. Is there a leader in the partnership or is it all a matter of shared responsibility? A quick word on court might change the result of a game which is slipping away from you.
    Remember…Teamwork is the success formula in doubles!

  5. #5
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    Default On another site....

    Avoid lifting or clearing the shuttle, which is like punting in football. By clearing, you are giving the opponents a chance to win. If you do clear, your team should adopt a side-by-side defensive position. The whole point of the rally, starting with the service, is to hit shots that force the opponents to lift. This is why when you are serving your partner stands behind you because you hope to make the receivers lift with your good short serve. This is also why when you are receiving serve your partner stands behind you because you hope with your aggressive return you will make someone on the serving team lift to your partner. If your opponents clear to your side, the person who will hit the shuttle must hit downwards (either smashing or dropping) while the partner must be moving to the front as soon as he realizes the shuttle is not his. This is the up and back offense position, the better to control the net. From now on the smasher gets all the deep ones, while the net man cuts off or puts away everything else.
    If you have the offense, it is safest if you do not smash cross-court, since their down-the-line return will be directed at your undefended open space. Find out how your opponent directly across the net from you waits for your smash. If he waits on his backhand, smash wide to his forehand or close to his forehand hip or shoulder. If he waits on his forehand, smash to his body or his backhand. If he stands deep, hit drops or cut smashes. If he stands close and waits with his racket up, try a quick clear.
    If you are on defense, try to flatten the smash out so that the smasher cannot smash again. You can return cross-court with the aim of tiring the smasher or forcing him to hit a laterally off-balanced shot, but the cross-court must avoid the net man.

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