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    Default Doubles question - switching up

    So let's suppose you're in doubles and there's a clear to your partner so you're front and back and he smashes and the opponent clears.

    Under what circumstances do you take the clear instead of your partner?

    Back when I was learning I was told there were two methods, one where net guy stays at the net until the bird go's high to the opposition; the other where there's some sort of rotation system...but a lot of time has passed, any thing new on that front?

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    I do not think it is your job under any circumstance to go for the clear, assuming that it is a high and deep, since your partner is already in the back. Switching would be a waste of time and position, unless you are lightening quick.

    Do you use doubles rotation in your games? If not, the concept is quite simple; COVER THE AREA YOUR PARTNER IS NOT IN.


    Offensive = front and back

    Defensive = side to side


    These should be the position you and your partner should be in. Sorry I am so vague. It is quite difficult to describe doubles rotation over the internet.

    I hope this helps.

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    This is sort of what I was talking about. Instead of a pure horizontal division of responsibility, it is more angled (though not as angled as in the picture IMO). The idea being that the front guy should cut off attacking clears and half court shots.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

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    I usually pay attention to where my opponent is. If my opponent is deep on his forehand side and they hit a quick return to his backhand, I would go back for it and the samething applies to the forehand side.

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    I have a question. My coach stressed that in an attacking position. If the opponent does a 3/4 clear to the back, the back player takes it, does an attacking shot, "follows" the shot and covers the front. The reason for doing that because it is easier to move from back to front and at the same time the person can see what's going on. While the front player moves to the back covers it. The coach has coached in the college level and probably above.

    I was told, when on the offensive, the front player always stay at the front and back always stay on the back.

    So, now I am totally confused. The coach explained it very well why he does that kind of attacking rotation. Unfortunately, I was outnumbered and can't win arguements. Is there an attacking rotation?

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    Default Just giving my 2 cents..

    Quote Originally Posted by mkwanster
    I have a question. My coach stressed that in an attacking position. If the opponent does a 3/4 clear to the back, the back player takes it, does an attacking shot, "follows" the shot and covers the front. The reason for doing that because it is easier to move from back to front and at the same time the person can see what's going on. While the front player moves to the back covers it. The coach has coached in the college level and probably above.

    I was told, when on the offensive, the front player always stay at the front and back always stay on the back.

    So, now I am totally confused. The coach explained it very well why he does that kind of attacking rotation. Unfortunately, I was outnumbered and can't win arguements. Is there an attacking rotation?
    ..hmm, if i understand your post, i believe your coach's suggestion is similar to the "Modern" diagram above. Doing so will require a great deal of understanding and communication with your partner. I think the only time you want to employ such move is if you want to switch position/take turns with your partner of playing front and back. And usually it's common in XD, as the female player who's playing in the back wants to switch up-front and vice versa. IMO, it's not suggested, as it's kind of a risk in that your opponent might return your attacking shot(s) and send it back where it will be in a "no man's land". But worst come to worst, if that happens & if your partner doesn't expect that move/switch, s/he will be the one who will take the brunt of the responsibility to cover that returned shot. It's good if your partner takes a forehand shot, but if not, your partner will have to rely on his/her backhand or even an off-balance shot..
    Last edited by ctjcad; 04-24-2007 at 01:39 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hemants
    This is sort of what I was talking about. Instead of a pure horizontal division of responsibility, it is more angled (though not as angled as in the picture IMO). The idea being that the front guy should cut off attacking clears and half court shots.
    Kewl graphix. Where did you find these? Did you create them?


    Quote Originally Posted by mkwanster
    I have a question. My coach stressed that in an attacking position. If the opponent does a 3/4 clear to the back, the back player takes it, does an attacking shot, "follows" the shot and covers the front. The reason for doing that because it is easier to move from back to front and at the same time the person can see what's going on. While the front player moves to the back covers it. The coach has coached in the college level and probably above.

    I was told, when on the offensive, the front player always stay at the front and back always stay on the back.

    So, now I am totally confused...
    Which style you adopt will be dependent on your level of play -- what suits both you and your partner's playing level best. I try to incorporate the "modern method" but many of my partners just get confused about the court coverage & rotation.

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    I have done drills on the "modern method" and am adopting it. Although, I still make mistakes using it. Unfortunately, I am playing with a people who still use the traditional method

    Quote Originally Posted by SystemicAnomaly
    Kewl graphix. Where did you find these? Did you create them?




    Which style you adopt will be dependent on your level of play -- what suits both you and your partner's playing level best. I try to incorporate the "modern method" but many of my partners just get confused about the court coverage & rotation.

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    You're right...it will take a great deal of understanding and communication with each other in doubles play. Usually it's the front player that signals the switch and therefore moves out of the way, giving the back person more options of the shot (can to a cross court shot for example), covers the front and cuts off any low attack returns.

    what I said above is what was taught, drilled to me and still training....

    Quote Originally Posted by ctjcad
    ..hmm, if i understand your post, i believe your coach's suggestion is similar to the "Modern" diagram above. Doing so will require a great deal of understanding and communication with your partner. I think the only time you want to employ such move is if you want to switch position/take turns with your partner of playing front and back. And usually it's common in XD, as the female player who's playing in the back wants to switch up-front and vice versa. IMO, it's not suggested, as it's kind of a risk in that your opponent might return your attacking shot(s) and send it back where it will be in a "no man's land". But worst come to worst, if that happens & if your partner doesn't expect that move/switch, s/he will be the one who will take the brunt of the responsibility to cover that returned shot. It's good if your partner takes a forehand shot, but if not, your partner will have to rely on his/her backhand or even an off-balance shot..

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    personally, making this decision depends on the skill of the back guy. if i knew he couldn't move across the 2 back corners quick enough i'd take the smash returns instead of letting him run across the 2 corners. But if the back guy is really strong i'll rather stay at the net as i know i can count on him, and i'd be more useful waiting to kill weak replies than to rotate.

    usually for me, If the back guy needs help, he would signal a 'tap-in' by a shout or something ---this means he'll tap in and move forward after the smash, and i'll move backwards (normal rotation method). A net reply would be taken by the back player who has now moved foward. A lift can be taken by either players. this ensures that the back guy is always able to call for help when he's tired or encountering difficulties jumping from corner to corner

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    good point, thanks a bunch!

    Quote Originally Posted by DivingBirdie
    personally, making this decision depends on the skill of the back guy. if i knew he couldn't move across the 2 back corners quick enough i'd take the smash returns instead of letting him run across the 2 corners. But if the back guy is really strong i'll rather stay at the net as i know i can count on him, and i'd be more useful waiting to kill weak replies than to rotate.

    usually for me, If the back guy needs help, he would signal a 'tap-in' by a shout or something ---this means he'll tap in and move forward after the smash, and i'll move backwards (normal rotation method). A net reply would be taken by the back player who has now moved foward. A lift can be taken by either players. this ensures that the back guy is always able to call for help when he's tired or encountering difficulties jumping from corner to corner

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    from what i've seen, you only move in on the smashes when you are smashing down on the side. the concept is that ur smashing momentum will take u forward and if the back at you is bad, itz an instant kill for you. if they cross it, ur partner can easily cuz it off unless itz high in which case, ur partner would take couple of steps and smash again while u move up to cover the net. the only time this rotation does not really work is when one is directly behind the other usually in the midcourt. the concept is simple and logical but doing it is hard. this is also to keep both players moving because if they just run ur partner back and forth at the back and suprise you in the front, chance are you won't get there fast enuff as you have been in a single spot for a good amount of time (10 seconds is more than enuff to create a slight slowdown in the front for me anyway)

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    If you want to take the clear, you'll want to position your defense such that you're slightly closer to the back, and your partner slightly closer to the net. Then, it would be easier for you to get back, and easier for your partner to get in front of you.

    Hm... this sounds familiar -> this is pretty much the main reason for the defensive position used in mixed doubles.

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