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  1. #1871
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    Default Lifetime Award for Retno Kustiyah

    Bridging the gap of a different era in RI badminton

    Agnes Winarti, The Jakarta Post, Jakarta | Wed, 08/18/2010 11:08 AM | Sports

    In a career of dedication to badminton, Retno Kustiyah has spent five decades listening to the sound of sneakers screeching against the court, and she realizes that changes need to be made in the way the country develops the next generation of talent.

    Retno, who is currently a caretaker at prominent badminton club Jayaraya, received an award from President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono last week for her lifetime dedication to the one of the country’s most popular sports.

    “The era has changed now. We cannot force today’s generation to do exactly as we did back then,” said Retno, pointing out how values such hard work and persistence have been sidelined by consumerism and materialism, which offer instant gratification.

    ---------------------------

    *Full article : http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2...badminton.html

  2. #1872
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    Quote Originally Posted by CLELY View Post
    Bridging the gap of a different era in RI badminton

    Agnes Winarti, The Jakarta Post, Jakarta | Wed, 08/18/2010 11:08 AM | Sports

    In a career of dedication to badminton, Retno Kustiyah has spent five decades listening to the sound of sneakers screeching against the court, and she realizes that changes need to be made in the way the country develops the next generation of talent.

    Retno, who is currently a caretaker at prominent badminton club Jayaraya, received an award from President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono last week for her lifetime dedication to the one of the country’s most popular sports.

    “The era has changed now. We cannot force today’s generation to do exactly as we did back then,” said Retno, pointing out how values such hard work and persistence have been sidelined by consumerism and materialism, which offer instant gratification.

    ---------------------------

    *Full article : http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2...badminton.html
    True, young people especially in big cities are now prefer going to big malls and/or many other entertainments. No wonder why more pro players are found from the country side.

  3. #1873
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    Quote Originally Posted by CLELY View Post
    July 19, 2010

    Ami Afriatni

    Indonesian Badminton Coaches Not Interested in Hiring Foreigners

    National team coaches have criticized a suggestion by the badminton federation to add foreigners to the coaching staff, saying that would not solve the problems facing the sport.

    The Indonesian Badminton Association’s (PBSI) vice president, Sabar Yudo Saroso, hinted last week at a plan to hire foreign coaches, particularly from China, in response to the struggles of the country’s shuttlers on the international stage.

    But national mixed doubles coach Richard Mainaky said the PBSI had lost sight of the real problems facing the sport.

    “Players who enter the national training camp come from clubs, but these clubs have failed to train players to perform at a very high level,” Richard told the Jakarta Globe on Monday.

    “The poor training at the club level affects the way players perform, and these players in turn carry their habits onto the national team.”
    ----------------------------------------------------

    *Full article through this link -- http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/badmi...eigners/386697

    Has Sabar Yudo Saroso lost his mind? INA has so many talented ex-players and coaches that are now wasted and coaching successfully in overseas, if PBSI really want to improve they have to spend the $$$ on bringing them back.

    Rexy went to MAS and made their MD wolrd no.1. Fung Permadi involved in Taiwan and their standard is much higher now. Tony Gunawan became US citizen and makes a big impact on badminton popularity and also won the WC with Howard Bach in their home soil.

    Above all, I think the greatest lost to INA badminton is TangXianHu, who went off to China and discovered Lin Dan and the subsequent gereration of players that dominate TC and UC for the last decade or so.

    If nothing is done/fix, I guess it will be INA faith to fade away in the sport of badminton. Our country will be remembered as the uruguay of badminton, who won everything before but will never win it again. My greatest hope lies not in the PBSI (which IMO contribute nothing but corrupted funding and central association) but in the local clubs like Djarum (which also well funded), CWIBC, Suryanaga and TH new centre and all other smaller clubs around the countries. All of them have the potential to discover and groom new stars of the future.

  4. #1874
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    I believe the PBSI officials (including Pak Sabar) meant well. I met him during the Macau Open and he's a nice guy. More importantly, he (and Pak Djoko, Oka, Djenjen and others) is committed to improving the standards of badminton in Indonesia (who seem to be experiencing a decline at the moment). I also believe that the age of corruption within PBSI has also slowly been eradicated as these generals will certainly not tolerate any hanky panky. The only problem (and thats where they need help) is that they lack the knowledge of badminton. But with the help of people connected to the badminton world (and BWF most importantluy), slowly but surely, they are getting it right. It just takes time.

    I would disagree if you consider those ex-players overseas not employed by PBSI at the moment to be wasted. Instead, I would say they are great assets to the development of badminton throughout the world! Fung Permadi made his contribution to improve Chinese-Taipei's badminton standard before he returned back to Djarum recently. Atik Jauhari also did his job well when he resigned from Pelatnas and went over to India. But success overseas does not imply that they will also be successful back home. In fact, Atik went to India after a relatively mediocre stint of coaching the WD pairs in Pelatnas.

    Steps have been made to rectify the errors made in the past and hopefully we shall see some light at the of the tunnel in the near future.
    Last edited by badMania; 08-18-2010 at 03:17 AM.

  5. #1875
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    just my 3 sens:
    ..about INA's seemingly "decline" in badminton dominance in the last decade, i would also attribute it partly on the 1998 Asian financial crisis and the horrible 1998 incident after the fall of Suharto. Remember in the 90s, INA badminton pretty much was dominant in the pro badminton scene. Those incidents probably changed the landscape and mindset of future prospective players. Not the least was the exodus of world class players (e.g. Tony G. leaving Pelatnas at his peak age), which probably led to other younger players to consider foreign careers opportunities.
    It's good the current people in charge of PBSI have a good mindset & intention, so far. I think everything starts at the top, the leaders. I guess it will take a bit of patience before we can see INA badminton return back to somewhat of her glorious days in international pro baddy scene.
    Next yr's INA Open Premier SS, hopefully, is a good start~good luck!
    Last edited by ctjcad; 08-18-2010 at 02:47 PM.

  6. #1876
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    Quote Originally Posted by badMania View Post
    I believe the PBSI officials (including Pak Sabar) meant well. I met him during the Macau Open and he's a nice guy. More importantly, he (and Pak Djoko, Oka, Djenjen and others) is committed to improving the standards of badminton in Indonesia (who seem to be experiencing a decline at the moment). I also believe that the age of corruption within PBSI has also slowly been eradicated as these generals will certainly not tolerate any hanky panky. The only problem (and thats where they need help) is that they lack the knowledge of badminton. But with the help of people connected to the badminton world (and BWF most importantluy), slowly but surely, they are getting it right. It just takes time.

    I would disagree if you consider those ex-players overseas not employed by PBSI at the moment to be wasted. Instead, I would say they are great assets to the development of badminton throughout the world! Fung Permadi made his contribution to improve Chinese-Taipei's badminton standard before he returned back to Djarum recently. Atik Jauhari also did his job well when he resigned from Pelatnas and went over to India. But success overseas does not imply that they will also be successful back home. In fact, Atik went to India after a relatively mediocre stint of coaching the WD pairs in Pelatnas.

    Steps have been made to rectify the errors made in the past and hopefully we shall see some light at the of the tunnel in the near future.
    Im not trying to become a sceptic in anyway, but im simply fed up with lip service and to some degree talk show by INA officials (both in Govt and associations), they simply dont know how to run organisation well. I have to agree that its getting better everyday, but its no where near a satisfactory profesional level where for example a corporate organisation would demonstrate. If we look back to the past, its not the PBSI that made the big impact in INA badminton scene but again its the local club that discovered the likes of Rudy Hartono. PBSI is in fact the beneficary of the process. Now, if PBSI really wants to take the central role in surviving INA badminton, they must walk the talk. Spend the $$$ marketing badminton popularity from the grass root level (including TV coverage and local competitions), technically and financially assisting the smaller clubs, getting the best coaches for the Pelatnas so that it can become not just a place of gathering/practice but where players can effectively increase their standard. PBSI must now realise that the passion of badminton has somehow changed over the years as INA is modernised and badminton become less attractive as a career choice. As a result the pool of talent become smaller and smaller, therefore any actions PBSI take have to counteract this issue.

    It is clear for ex-players/coaches that Pelatnas job at the moment is not that attractive, maybe not just because the $$$ issue but can be for many other reward issue. So who's to blame if Atik was not successful at Pelatnas but did well in India, to me its a proof that he was not well managed and this can happen to everybody. The question should be; has PBSI/Pelatnas have the best coach/staff that is available out there? The answer is likely to be NO, simply because these talents are not interested enough to join Pelatnas/PBSI as a coach or staff, the same reason why less youngsters choose badminton as a career.

    As much as i like badminton to spread well around the world, i like INA to be back to the glory days. But the resposibility lies first on our back yard and once that fixed then we can help at our neighbours garden. Its not the time to worry about INA involvement internationally, as an expat i can say that at least in Sydney Indonesian expats are doing really2 well from coaching to winning local competitions.

    It is though encouraging to see Chandra Wijaya and TH are opening badminton schools. In fact anything that ex-players actively and directly involve in badminton marketing is a good thing.

    Overall, i crossed my fingers.

  7. #1877
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    Quote Originally Posted by ctjcad View Post
    just my 3 sens:
    ..about INA's seemingly "decline" in badminton dominance in the last decade, i would also attribute it partly on the 1998 Asian financial crisis and the horrible 1998 incident after the fall of Suharto. Remember in the 90s, INA badminton pretty much was dominant in the pro badminton scene. Those incidents probably changed the landscape and mindset of future prospective players. Not the least was the exodus of world class players (e.g. Tony G. leaving Pelatnas at his peak age), which probably led to other younger players to consider foreign careers opportunities.
    It's good the current people in charge of PBSI have a good mindset & intention, so far. I think everything starts at the top, the leaders. I guess it will take a bit of patience before we can see INA badminton return back to somewhat of her glorious days in international pro baddy scene.
    Next yr's INA Open Premier SS, hopefully, is a good start~good luck!
    I have to say its been a rare accoasion, but looks like i have to agree with your exodus theory

  8. #1878
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    Isn't that what PBSI is doing right now? Start promoting badminton at grass-roots, make the local circuits more competitive, etc.

    In case you are not following the local badminton scenes, I will be pleased to inform you that the competition at Sirnas (domestic circuits) has been very intense, esp since last year. This year, Djarum increases the number of Sirnas to 9 (we are done with Balikpapan, Manado, Pekanbaru, Jakarta, Bandung, Tegal, and Bali) and we are left with just 2 more now (Surabaya and Medan). Plus the various local & international competitions sponsored by local companies like the Indocock Walikota Surabaya Cup, Tangkas Alfamart Junior International, Indonesia International Challenge, Candra Wijaya Men's Doubles Badminton Championships, and some other smaller regional ones like the Moenadi Cup.

    It is through the Sirnas that we have spotted some talents at 14-15yo that will hopefully develop into World-Beaters. But obviously, it takes time.

    Do we really need the best coach with best qualification? My answer is not really. I do believe that most of the coaches we have are qualified enough.

    In MS, we have Mas Agus, recruited early this year from PB Djarum. So far, Sony and Simon have both won a title each this year. Not too bad I would say.

    In MD, we have Sigit Pamungkas, who single-handedly transform Kido/Hendra from nobodies to World and Olympic Champions. Bambang Supriyanto is also doing a good job in coaching the Pratama pairs who won a couple of international titles recently.

    In WD, we have Aryono Minarat. Undoubtedly, WD and WS are probably INA's weakest links for so long. But, we do still see pairs like Annisa/Anneke winning GP tourneys last year.

    In XD, we have Richard Mainaky, who also produce serial WC winners in Nova/Butet and right now, we are seeing some regeneration happening.

    The only coach whom I deem to be underperforming will be Marleve Mainaky in WS.
    Last edited by badMania; 08-18-2010 at 08:23 PM.

  9. #1879
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    OK its great to hear that, i hope those competitions will have a lot of fruitful ending products.

    On the current past issue, yes we have MK/HS, Sony, Simon, Nova/Butet etc but we are not as strong as before especially now on the regeneration issue. From where im sitting, i can only know Hayom is the only hope at the moment that is once the current generation is out of the picture. This scenario was just inimaginable just a decade ago, we seems to have floods of players ready to step up. So it looks like the chart is going down and heading to ressesion

  10. #1880
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    We did have our gloomy periods before when CHN dominated the scene back in 1980-1990. After that, the golden era of INA badminton began. Despite our "decline", we still manage to hold the tradition of winning an Olympic Gold Medal since 1992 even in this decade.

    We have some potential players (some already prove their worth, some are still raw and need more tourneys to prove themselves):
    MS - Dionysius Hayom Rumbaka, Riyanto Subagja, Evert Sukamta (the last one are still inconsistent and raw)
    WS - Sandy and Krisna will be more familiar with this. Honestly, I still think we are lacking in this field, but recently, we saw Ana Rovita managing to surprise a few ppl.

    MD - Rian Agung Saputro/Angga Pratama (and maybe Rendy Sugiarto/Afiat Yuris Wirawan) - need more exposure. Below them, Mohd Ulinnuha/Berry Angriawan (WJC 2009 runner-up & winner of INA IC 2010) and Agrippina Prima/Ricky Karanda Suwardi will be the choice.

    Personally, I (and I believe many others) am not worried about the regeneration in MD (and XD) as we have a long line of successors who are proving their worth in Sirnas, like: Jones Ralfy Jansen (AJC 2010 bronze-medallist with Dandi Prabudita), Praveen Jordan/Rangga Yave Rianto (INA's best candidate for AJC & WJC 2011), Kevin Sanjaya (just turned 15 last week and will be the one to watch in the next few years), Raffidias Akhdan Nugroho (very tall boy, and still 14-15), and others.

    WD - Suci Rizki Andini/Della Destiara Haris and Jenna Gozali/Variella April Sasi should be the one to watch in the next 1-2 years. The best thing is, they are still very young (esp Suci).

    XD - Tantowi Ahmad/Liliyana Natsir (won the Macau Open in their very first tourney as a pair, beat the Olympics champions in Chinese-Taipei Open, and undoubtedly, they will be INA's no 1 pair for the next few years), Fran Kurniawan/Pia Zebadiah Bernadet, Mohd Rijal/Debby Susanto (slowly but surely, they are creeping up), and Mohd Rizki Dellynugraha/Richie Puspita Dili will be the one to rely upon.

    Below them, Riky Widianto/Jenna Gozali, Hendra Mulyono/Ayu Rahmasari will be coming up to join them next year. Not to mention other young pairs from clubs like Hafiz Faizal/Shella Devi and Edi Subaktiar/Ririn Amelia.

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    how long does ina need to take to be comparable with china just like in 1990's?

  12. #1882
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    Quote Originally Posted by limsy View Post
    how long does ina need to take to be comparable with china just like in 1990's?
    adding another 2.5 sens:
    ..on the men's side, maybe in 2+ more yrs (after the 2012 OG)? once the likes of LD, BCL, CY & FHF retire??..right now, CHN's Men's team is powerful because of those 4..
    ..on the women's side, CHN is still too strong, despite their WS players still trying to find who will be their no.1, 2, and 3 players. Their WD squad is also trying to find who will be their no.1, 2, and 3 pairs..
    Last edited by ctjcad; 08-19-2010 at 12:36 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by badMania View Post
    We did have our gloomy periods before when CHN dominated the scene back in 1980-1990. After that, the golden era of INA badminton began. Despite our "decline", we still manage to hold the tradition of winning an Olympic Gold Medal since 1992 even in this decade.
    So are you saying that the current form is better than back in 80s? As far as I remember it was not as bad as now.

    Quote Originally Posted by badMania View Post
    We have some potential players (some already prove their worth, some are still raw and need more tourneys to prove themselves):
    MS - Dionysius Hayom Rumbaka, Riyanto Subagja, Evert Sukamta (the last one are still inconsistent and raw)
    WS - Sandy and Krisna will be more familiar with this. Honestly, I still think we are lacking in this field, but recently, we saw Ana Rovita managing to surprise a few ppl.

    MD - Rian Agung Saputro/Angga Pratama (and maybe Rendy Sugiarto/Afiat Yuris Wirawan) - need more exposure. Below them, Mohd Ulinnuha/Berry Angriawan (WJC 2009 runner-up & winner of INA IC 2010) and Agrippina Prima/Ricky Karanda Suwardi will be the choice.

    Personally, I (and I believe many others) am not worried about the regeneration in MD (and XD) as we have a long line of successors who are proving their worth in Sirnas, like: Jones Ralfy Jansen (AJC 2010 bronze-medallist with Dandi Prabudita), Praveen Jordan/Rangga Yave Rianto (INA's best candidate for AJC & WJC 2011), Kevin Sanjaya (just turned 15 last week and will be the one to watch in the next few years), Raffidias Akhdan Nugroho (very tall boy, and still 14-15), and others.

    WD - Suci Rizki Andini/Della Destiara Haris and Jenna Gozali/Variella April Sasi should be the one to watch in the next 1-2 years. The best thing is, they are still very young (esp Suci).

    XD - Tantowi Ahmad/Liliyana Natsir (won the Macau Open in their very first tourney as a pair, beat the Olympics champions in Chinese-Taipei Open, and undoubtedly, they will be INA's no 1 pair for the next few years), Fran Kurniawan/Pia Zebadiah Bernadet, Mohd Rijal/Debby Susanto (slowly but surely, they are creeping up), and Mohd Rizki Dellynugraha/Richie Puspita Dili will be the one to rely upon.

    Below them, Riky Widianto/Jenna Gozali, Hendra Mulyono/Ayu Rahmasari will be coming up to join them next year. Not to mention other young pairs from clubs like Hafiz Faizal/Shella Devi and Edi Subaktiar/Ririn Amelia.

    I really hope that you are right

  14. #1884
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    Quote Originally Posted by limsy View Post
    how long does ina need to take to be comparable with china just like in 1990's?
    Ahem, in the 1990s, China in MS and especially in MD was sub-par compared to INA MS and MD... Practically, throughout the 1990s, 5 of the top 10 MS players were from INA , and 5 of the top MD pairs were from INA... (at one time, 8 of the top 10 MS were from INA, the best CHN MS was ranked 20 or something)

    Quote Originally Posted by Yoppy View Post
    So are you saying that the current form is better than back in 80s? As far as I remember it was not as bad as now.
    Between 1980-1984, INA was still a top country in MS and MD. We did win the Thomas Cup in 1980 and 1984... lost the 1982 edition to China.

    Later on, in the late 1980s... yup comparable to today... [just without any official WR back then]... China won virtually all World Championship, All England titles etc. and the Thomas & Uber Cups between 1986, 88, 90... In WS, WD, and XD, the late 1980s was terrible for us... even worse than today. At least today we are competitive in XD!

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    The main issue that is preventing INA from producing more outstanding players: economics! Not enough financial incentive for parents to support/push their child to become top pros... Many (a vast majority) of parents love seeing their children play badminton at the amateur level, but won't encourage them to earn a living by becoming top pros... This wasn't the case for the parents in the early 1980s...

    At that time, our top 2 MS players were: Liem Swie King and Icuk Sugiarto, both earned around US$ 120,000 per year from individual sponsorships... While the average earning of a family in that era was: US$800 per year in PPP terms, according to the CIA factbook]... so, the top MS player was earning 150 times more than the average family income. Not surprisingly, the parents of the likes of Susi Susanti, Alan Budikusuma, Ardi Wiranata, Candra Wijaya, Tony Gunawan, Harianto Arby, etc. were supportive for a badminton career for their kids.

    The parents (being human) has aspirations that their kid will be financially well off like the top MS players... they discount the facts that so many mediocre players of those days earned $2000 per year. PLUS: there aren't many other alternatives that offer instant economic rewards. No vibrant stock market, no Indonesian Idol, no Sinetrons (TV dramas), no youtube Keong Racun instant success, nothing like that...

    Today, our Taufik Hidayat and Sony Dwi Kuncoro earn around US$150,000 to US$120,000 per year... while the average family GDP is US$4000 per year... So they are earning 37 to 30 times more than the average... not as enticing as 150 times! And there were too many cases of mediocre players [still earning $2000 per year today] that end up in the streets afterwards... PLUS: there are many MANY other alternative careers that offer more instant success [with less downside] and other financially rewarding long-term careers..... I don't need to mention the examples, you guys know laaah...

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    Cool INA Prize Money total is improving!

    Let's look at this picture of total prize money in US$ that can be obtained by playing in our home soil:

    2004 (estimated, because I forgot the exact figure and exchange rate)
    INA Open: $ 100,000
    INA National Circuits (four): $ 10,000
    INA Satellite: $ 1,500
    Independent tournaments (two): $ 5,000
    INA National Championships: $5,000
    Total: $121,500

    2011 (estimated, because I assume everything will go as planned)
    INA Open Premier SS: $ 600,000
    INA GP Gold: $ 120,000
    INA Challenge: $ 15,000
    INA National Circuits (ten): $ 200,000
    Independent tournaments (four): $ 30,000
    Tangkas Alfamart Junior International: $ 30,000
    INA National Championships: $ 20,000
    Total: $ 1,150,000

    More than 9 times larger in a span of 7 years... Hopefully there are more parents who will support their kids in becoming pros...

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    Hehehe...it has been a long time since Krisna write such long posts in this thread :P

    From Krisna's post: "Later on, in the late 1980s... yup comparable to today... [just without any official WR back then]... "

    Indeed, it is comparable. And it was also in late 80s that we began to see the prospects of new talents emerging like Alan, Ardi, etc. Not to mention the Doubles.

    I will think that the situation in INA is NOT AS BAD as what some ppl here will think of. The performance of the players in the National Team may look bad, but, we do have some emerging talents that hopefully we can count on in the future!

    At least in MD and XD, we should not worry.

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