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View Poll Results: most difficult shot to master

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  • clear

    176 8.42%
  • lift

    61 2.92%
  • drop

    344 16.46%
  • smash

    409 19.57%
  • drive

    111 5.31%
  • straight net

    97 4.64%
  • crosscourt net

    892 42.68%
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  1. #494
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    i think backhand crosscourt drop shot is the most difficult for me... T_T

  2. #495
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    Backhand smash is probably the hardest shot and the first few times, I kept smashing it to the net.

  3. #496
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    I still can't do the drop shot, all i am doing is slowdown the shuttle speed ! Please help me !!

  4. #497
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    I don't remember what I originally said, but I have to say that both the jump smash and the standard short serve are the hardest to master.


    With the jump smash, your body location/jump angle/jump timing/shuttle placement/arm pronation amount are all factors when smashing. It's absolutely ridiculously difficult to be able to replicate the same precision for every smash when all of these things are so different with every smash. The last thing I feel comfortable relearning when I come back from an absence from badminton is my jump smash. I think that one of the reasons I enjoy it (besides the fact that I am jumping around hitting a shuttle at full power) is that there is so much that must be done correctly in sync to get the jump smash perfect (angle, power, recovery, energy efficiency), and so when it's done correctly, it's so amazing, considering how many things could go wrong.


    The short serve is one of the easiest and most commonly practiced shots, but it also has probably the least margin for error:
    (1) The opponent will be expecting it to come, and having placed his/herself in a position to receive it, will apply lots of pressure on you, both mental and spacial.
    (2) There is very little distance between an attack-able and non-attackable serve.
    (3) It can be quite tricky trying to get the mix of angle and speed correctly.


    For these reasons I think these two are the most difficult.


    While the clear is probably the most difficult to maintain a precise accuracy, there is also more margin of error for what defines a good and bad clear. I feel pretty much the same way about a lift.

    Drops/net shots can be very difficult, but as there are so many varieties on drop/net shots in terms of technique and placement, the margin of error is not as bad as the short serve.

    Drives are actually probably my weakest shot, but I think that the drive itself is not that difficult to master, it's the reaction time that is difficult to develop.

  5. #498
    Regular Member j4ckie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hiroisuke View Post
    I don't remember what I originally said, but I have to say that both the jump smash and the standard short serve are the hardest to master.


    With the jump smash, your body location/jump angle/jump timing/shuttle placement/arm pronation amount are all factors when smashing. It's absolutely ridiculously difficult to be able to replicate the same precision for every smash when all of these things are so different with every smash. The last thing I feel comfortable relearning when I come back from an absence from badminton is my jump smash. I think that one of the reasons I enjoy it (besides the fact that I am jumping around hitting a shuttle at full power) is that there is so much that must be done correctly in sync to get the jump smash perfect (angle, power, recovery, energy efficiency), and so when it's done correctly, it's so amazing, considering how many things could go wrong.


    The short serve is one of the easiest and most commonly practiced shots, but it also has probably the least margin for error:
    (1) The opponent will be expecting it to come, and having placed his/herself in a position to receive it, will apply lots of pressure on you, both mental and spacial.
    (2) There is very little distance between an attack-able and non-attackable serve.
    (3) It can be quite tricky trying to get the mix of angle and speed correctly.


    For these reasons I think these two are the most difficult.


    While the clear is probably the most difficult to maintain a precise accuracy, there is also more margin of error for what defines a good and bad clear. I feel pretty much the same way about a lift.

    Drops/net shots can be very difficult, but as there are so many varieties on drop/net shots in terms of technique and placement, the margin of error is not as bad as the short serve.

    Drives are actually probably my weakest shot, but I think that the drive itself is not that difficult to master, it's the reaction time that is difficult to develop.
    Very good post. I agree with the reasoning, the short serve is difficult to master. It is, however, one of the few things you can do on your own
    I still maintain the backhand clear is the hardest shot. Similar to the jump smash, there are several factors that define a good BH clear: timing (absolutely crucial), supination, the correct angle of the racket, and of course a quick swing. In my case, the supination is not nearly as strong as pronation, and the timing is not always good, which results in short&punishable clears. At least you face the shuttle when doing a jump smash

  6. #499
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    Jump smash (I meant the real jump smash not the one that players only jump 10cm in the air), definitely ! look simply but trying to get everything in sync needs alot ,lot practice .... one thing hiro forgot is the preparation of footwork is so important in the jump smash that timing is everything . Personally I only hit the jump smash if I have to against higher level of opponent in doubles (never in singles otherwise I would never get back to the base in time)

  7. #500
    Regular Member j4ckie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by staiger View Post
    Jump smash (I meant the real jump smash not the one that players only jump 10cm in the air), definitely ! look simply but trying to get everything in sync needs alot ,lot practice .... one thing hiro forgot is the preparation of footwork is so important in the jump smash that timing is everything . Personally I only hit the jump smash if I have to against higher level of opponent in doubles (never in singles otherwise I would never get back to the base in time)
    In singles I only do one when I have lots of time - then its quicker to recover than a normal smash, because you can jump forwards and coming down from the jump can use that speed to go forward (like a split step). The more hangtime you got, the easier it gets.

  8. #501
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    Nothing is more difficult than the "Cross court backhand smash"! It's so hard, few ever bother trying to play it.. or even practice the shot. It's a shot only hit in my dreams. Not sure whether even Taufik can hit it. Mind you, I'm not talking about some weak cross court drive that's going to get you killed.

  9. #502
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    Quote Originally Posted by terencechan View Post
    Nothing is more difficult than the "Cross court backhand smash"! It's so hard, few ever bother trying to play it.. or even practice the shot. It's a shot only hit in my dreams. Not sure whether even Taufik can hit it. Mind you, I'm not talking about some weak cross court drive that's going to get you killed.
    Let me correct myself.. the hardest shot is not the cross court backhand smash.. it's JUMPING Cross Court Backhand smash! The more ridiculously difficult shot that no one has ever mastered! Not even the great Taufik... forgive me guys.. all the stress from work and the wife is making me go nuts..
    Last edited by terencechan; 05-06-2011 at 11:08 AM.

  10. #503
    Regular Member j4ckie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by terencechan View Post
    Let me correct myself.. the hardest shot is not the cross court backhand smash.. it's JUMPING Cross Court Backhand smash! The more ridiculously difficult shot that no one has ever mastered! Not even the great Taufik... forgive me guys.. all the stress from work and the wife is making me go nuts..
    I can see no situation where that shot would be useful - if you have the time to jump, you have the time to play a forehand

  11. #504
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    I would never use a backhand cross-court smash. My coach will go crazy on me ! it is the most pointless shot in badminton thats why no one hits it.

    Jackie , Back to the real topic , in singles when you hit a jump smash , you had to hit it perfectly otherwise , if your opponent hit clear to backline and your momentum is taking you forward , there is no time to recover. unless you are super-fast/flexible

  12. #505
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    I prefer just the standing smash in singles and that suit me but other might prefer the jump smash !

  13. #506
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    Quote Originally Posted by staiger View Post
    I would never use a backhand cross-court smash. My coach will go crazy on me ! it is the most pointless shot in badminton thats why no one hits it.

    Jackie , Back to the real topic , in singles when you hit a jump smash , you had to hit it perfectly otherwise , if your opponent hit clear to backline and your momentum is taking you forward , there is no time to recover. unless you are super-fast/flexible
    No doubt your coach will go crazy. Most coaches would because they can't even hit the darn shot themselves! Conventional thinking in badminton rules out the shot simply because it's too outrageously difficult to hit. One only need to look back to the time when no one thought the jump smash was possible. If that's too far back, one can only need to look at Taufik. Before Taufik, no professorial even bothers to practice the backhand smash shot. If you tried it, your coach would go nuts. But Taufik went against the conventional thinking and awed everyone.
    Of course, the question is whether mastering such a shot is going to give you any advantage. Of course it does.
    1. The opponent has to look out for one extra shot in your repertoire.
    2. Since you don't have to jump backwards, you save stamina.
    3. The ability to intercept and hit the shuttle earlier.

    Ah.. it's the stress..

  14. #507
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    I find the (forehand) reverse slice drop shot lets me down a lot. It's very useful and deceptive in singles, but i ask too much of it and usually hit the net. Keeping on par with previous comments then obviously the backhand version would be much harder.

  15. #508
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    Quote Originally Posted by All But One View Post
    I find the (forehand) reverse slice drop shot lets me down a lot. It's very useful and deceptive in singles, but i ask too much of it and usually hit the net. Keeping on par with previous comments then obviously the backhand version would be much harder.
    You should watch the Zhao Jianhua video on the reverse slice. The trick to improving control is to have a flexible wrist and soft fingers to control the action.

  16. #509
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    Quote Originally Posted by terencechan View Post
    Let me correct myself.. the hardest shot is not the cross court backhand smash.. it's JUMPING Cross Court Backhand smash! The more ridiculously difficult shot that no one has ever mastered! Not even the great Taufik... forgive me guys.. all the stress from work and the wife is making me go nuts..
    Haha, it's quite difficult; I have tried. I'm not sure if the body mechanics work out efficiently though.






    Quote Originally Posted by staiger
    .... one thing hiro forgot is the preparation of footwork is so important in the jump smash that timing is everything .
    That's a good point, I did forget to mention that. That's also why it's really hard to practice jump smashes without a partner, haha, the footwork and timing get messed up.





    Quote Originally Posted by j4ckie
    I still maintain the backhand clear is the hardest shot. Similar to the jump smash, there are several factors that define a good BH clear: timing (absolutely crucial), supination, the correct angle of the racket, and of course a quick swing. In my case, the supination is not nearly as strong as pronation, and the timing is not always good, which results in short&punishable clears. At least you face the shuttle when doing a jump smash
    The backhand clear is indeed pretty difficult. I think it's not so hard for a straight clear though. As for your points...

    -timing: I think this is important for a lot of shots, such as feint/double shots, drives, smashes, etc.

    -supination: I actually don't feel that the difficulties of a backhand clear come from the supination, but rather from the need to turn the body to an unusual positioning as well as the coordination required between the body and the arm/wrist.

    -correct angle of the racket: Somehow I feel this is more important for drops, although crucial to all shots.

    -quick swing: I will definitely agree on this one. It's more difficult (although very possible) to learn to get a quick swing on the backhand clear.



    I actually think supination is better than pronation for most shots besides the smash. I think it's an issue with body rotation and footwork.


    Facing backwards/to the side does make things quite different, you are right.

  17. #510
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    personally, having played for a few years i would say the drop is hard to do properly if not trained, simply because it requires touch and accuracy
    do it wrong and it gives the opponent a good chance to go for the kill .
    this , ofcourse, is just my opinion XD

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