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    Default basic grip / forehand grip difference

    Whenever someone refers to both I always try to google them to make sure I'm understanding things properly, but the images/descriptions always look the same for both of them. Maybe the change is just so slight it's not apparent.

    I see this explains basic grip, and apparently forehand grip is 'handshake' grip, but when I do handshake grip, for me it looks just like basic grip.

    Apparently forehand is slightly more pan handle direction than basic...


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    The difference is quite subtle. It's not something to worry about too much, but it can make a difference.

    As you say, the forehand grip is slightly closer to panhandle, whereas the basic grip is slightly closer to thumb / backhand.

    If you look at your hand holding the racket in a relaxed grip, there should be a V shape between the thumb and index finger. The bottom point of the V is the webbing between the two fingers.

    On the forehand grip, the bottom point of the V is exactly in line with the side of the racket frame -- or in other words, it is directly over the middle of the side bevel.

    On the basic grip, the bottom point of the V is offset slightly to the left (for a right hander) -- so that it is directly over the corner point between the side and diagonal bevels.

    The grips guide you linked to, which I wrote, is basically right, but there are a few things I would do differently now. And will, when I get time to update it. It's also a bit stodgy and needs a trim...

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    Thanks. That is only a small difference. Think I'll stick with basic as I'm happy with it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by amleto View Post
    Thanks. That is only a small difference. Think I'll stick with basic as I'm happy with it.
    Glad to help. I would encourage you to do exactly that: stick with the grip that is working for you.

    I would never try to change a player's grip if it's working well. So for example, if a player is hitting cleanly with the basic grip, with no accidental slice, then there is no need to change it to a forehand grip (and vice-versa too).

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    It is my experience that the basic grip works very well and makes a lot of sense for those players who keep their side on posture during their stroke, whilst players who turn to face the net will not enjoy the basic grip.

    My reasoning: it is during the side on position that, if you raise your racket up high above you, you will notice that the strings are pointing in the correct direction. As such, players who either turn significantly before they play their shots OR remain very square to the net before they hit their shots do not enjoy the basic grip. However, those players who turn less noticeably to face forwards (i.e. I turn as part of the follow through or during the strike, rather than noticeably before the strike) tend to be happy with the basic grip.

    I could give examples, but will leave it at that for now.

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    That's an interesting observation, Matt. I think it's plausible.

    As you say, the correct angle of grip depends on how much the player has "turned into" the shot by the time of impact; or you might say, how far forwards the shoulder has come.

    In all cases, the goal is not to "use the approved grip", but to have a powerful and efficient hitting action with a clean contact and no (accidental) slice.

    Because everyone hits slightly differently, there is room for a little variation in grip angle too.

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    Exactly. You have explained that the way I wanted to. Its all about the rotation of the upper body at impact - which is different for everyone.

    Part of what I say is based on my observations of other players (professionals and club), but founded on my own experience (swinging with the basic grip is very hard work when front on, but very easy when side on, compared with swinging with a "forehand grip" which is easier the other way around).

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    Thanks Matt. Although most of the ingredients for the idea were there in my head somewhere, it wasn't until you suggested it that I made the connection. You've helped me fill in another little piece of my badminton puzzle.

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    How many pieces does the puzzle have?! Puzzle scare me when they get beyond 500 pieces - I don't have the patience!

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    Quote Originally Posted by MSeeley View Post
    How many pieces does the puzzle have?! Puzzle scare me when they get beyond 500 pieces - I don't have the patience!
    Too many pieces. I think I lost count somewhere around aleph 0.

    And the biggest trouble is that I try putting the edge pieces together first, making a clear framework that I can fill in towards the centre. But then as I get more experience putting the picture together, I discover that my edge pieces were arranged incorrectly so my framework is slightly wrong. It turns out the edge pieces can be combined in a different order and you will get a better picture -- a picture that more closely matches the one on the box, a picture in sharper focus.

    And then I take a break from the puzzle and step back so I can't see all the tiny pieces. Now with most of the pieces filled in it all looks quite simple from a distance, but it's not simple when you're kneeling on the floor trying to put it together. I have to remember that for when I'm helping other people get started with their own puzzles. I have to remember how to kneel on the floor.
    Last edited by Gollum; 04-13-2015 at 09:19 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MSeeley View Post
    Exactly. You have explained that the way I wanted to. Its all about the rotation of the upper body at impact - which is different for everyone.

    Part of what I say is based on my observations of other players (professionals and club), but founded on my own experience (swinging with the basic grip is very hard work when front on, but very easy when side on, compared with swinging with a "forehand grip" which is easier the other way around).
    I tend to turn quite early, because I believe in a kinematic transfer of force, and that you need put the weight forward as you strike. It's almost like throwing a bowling ball and not letting go. I tend to favour a forehand grip more than a basic grip, so much so that I tend to stick with my forehand grip rather than basic in the rear court, and only use basic for mid/front where I might need drives.

    I think if you're at the back court you have enough time to decide what grip you need to use. But then I might not've experienced something otherwise.

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    ^ But ummm... you don't count... because you have a weird shoulder arm anatomy...

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    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    ^ But ummm... you don't count... because you have a weird shoulder arm anatomy...
    And a double jointed arm... so yeah... I kinda don't count...

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    I think ultimately as long as the stroke and strike is correct, what grip is used is not super critical ... because what you use will also depend on where you are on the court when you hit and where you want the shuttle to go to. Sometimes you'd want a few degrees toward backhand, and other times you'd want a few degrees toward panhandle.

    Maybe for beginners learning their stroke technique they should be aware of grip, but for higher levels who already have good technique, don't need to get bogged down by the micro details.

    As Gollum says, step back a bit and look at the bigger picture...
    Last edited by visor; 04-13-2015 at 03:38 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie-SWUK View Post
    I tend to turn quite early, because I believe in a kinematic transfer of force, and that you need put the weight forward as you strike. It's almost like throwing a bowling ball and not letting go.
    I completely understand what you are saying. However, I will point out that a kinetic chain can be utilised even if you do not turn your upper body early.

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    is this early/late/other rotation?


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    I'd love to say I have diamond-dusted coaching eyes that can spot this from a mile off, but I'd be lying.

    The difference is so subtle that it really isn't productive to analyse from video. You as the player need to judge based on how the shot feels to you, what sound it makes, and whether it goes in the intended direction.

    If the grip is slightly wrong for the shot, then you will get a different feeling, sound, and result. The feeling will be like a very slight mis-hit, with a touch of accidental slice. The sound will be part way between a solid "bang" and a slice "shhhk" (nearer bang than shhhk).

    The direction is diagnostic of the grip error. When a shot consistently veers off to the left of target, then the basic grip is causing an unintended slice. When a shot consistently veers off to the right, then the forehand or slight panhandle grip is causing unintended reverse slice. These are for right-handers like yourself; for left-handers it's the opposite.

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