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View Poll Results: most difficult shot to master

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  • clear

    176 8.42%
  • lift

    61 2.92%
  • drop

    344 16.46%
  • smash

    409 19.57%
  • drive

    111 5.31%
  • straight net

    97 4.64%
  • crosscourt net

    892 42.68%
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  1. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by t3tsubo View Post
    -_-
    I put striaght net because returning tight netshots without having to resort to a crossnet is a SKILL. tight meaning almost netroll tight.
    no offence, but i think instead of SKILL, its should be STUBBORN instead
    you'll most likely get tapped, if not an "anyhow push". you'll be dead by then.

  2. #104
    Regular Member Badmintan's Avatar
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    Default crosscourt net

    Overwelmingly ppl vote for the 'crosscourt net' as the most difficult shot to master.

    Personally, I find executing it is not too difficult if the shot is taken early....but is difficult to pull off when taken late, eg 1) element of surprise lost 2) hitting under pressure - shot goes wide of the line.

    I find the crosscourt net is a low percentage shot as a good opponent can intercept (mid flight)as the birdie has to travel a greater distance rather than a straight path.

  3. #105
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    hmmmmmmmm when i voted for Clear there were less than 5 votes.......now it has shot up lol.

    anyway...a good crosscourt net is not really a low % shot in my opinion. in fact a fast, steep one (maybe almost what u guys call sticksmash) can often produce direct winners. But well...if an opponent anticipates well, even if it's hard to tap it, he'd most likely do a tight spinning net shot in that corner, and that's rather undesirable i guess.

  4. #106
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    The clear is not that easy. It's not just sending the shuttle from rear court to rear court, it's about varying height, rythm and also about keeping consistency. For me, when facing a better opponent, I still can play decent backhand drop, cross court, tight net shots, but my clears break down the first.

  5. #107
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    I voted clear as well.

    What if the opponent keeps hitting clears to your backhand side? and anticipates to pounce/smash on weak return or drop shots?

    I find hitting crosscourt clear (all the way from long service line) from my backhand side to send him back to his backhand long service line (provided he is a right hander) to be difficult. The shuttle have to travel more than 40 ft deep across the whole court and at least 20 to 30ft high!!!!

  6. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by Badmintan View Post
    What if the opponent keeps hitting clears to your backhand side? and anticipates to pounce/smash on weak return or drop shots?

    I find hitting crosscourt clear (all the way from long service line) from my backhand side to send him back to his backhand long service line (provided he is a right hander) to be difficult. The shuttle have to travel more than 40 ft deep across the whole court and at least 20 to 30ft high!!!!
    variation of pressing down the shuttles at different angles and different strength will do the trick.

    if you do that, your opponent will most probably not dare to move up too fast the net when you do a backhand shot. then, you'll have time to get ready again. but if he really guards his net so tight each time when you do a backhand shot, then a half-court backhand clear is enough to make his tumble

  7. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by Badmintan View Post
    I find hitting crosscourt clear (all the way from long service line) from my backhand side to send him back to his backhand long service line (provided he is a right hander) to be difficult.
    Then don't play it. It's far too ambitious.

    Even at the world-class level, players don't often play a full-court cross-court backhand clear. And when they do, it often gets them in trouble.

  8. #110
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    yeap, its probably a skill "for show" only

  9. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gollum View Post
    Then don't play it. It's far too ambitious.

    Even at the world-class level, players don't often play a full-court cross-court backhand clear. And when they do, it often gets them in trouble.

    i agree this shot is seldom used...but there's something similar which helps a lot ...it's more like a backhand crosscourt attacking clear. The key is when you already anticipate that your opponent is going to try to pin your backhand with a clear/drive, stick out your backhand early and whip it back into their backhand corner. In this case it's more like a intercepting shot(the good thing is it can still be done with shuttle slightly behind you) , thus less strength is required compared to a high shuttle dropping vertically on your backhand corner.
    so next time anticipate well and try it out...and tell me if it works good
    Last edited by DivingBirdie; 09-12-2007 at 06:02 AM.

  10. #112
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    In other words, you're describing a cross-court backhand clear played from the midcourt, or the front of the rearcourt. You can do this when your opponent's lift or clear was flat enough to allow early interception.

    This is much easier than a full-court clear, and a viable option.

  11. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gollum View Post
    In other words, you're describing a cross-court backhand clear played from the midcourt, or the front of the rearcourt. You can do this when your opponent's lift or clear was flat enough to allow early interception.

    This is much easier than a full-court clear, and a viable option.
    with good anticipation you can actually leap across faster, and even if the shuttle is slightly behind you...it can still be deflected back with backhand crosscourt if it approaches fast enough

  12. #114
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    the real fun starts when you jump while doing it

    I did/had to do it 2-3 times in a row in one rally (the level higher player was always a step ahead )
    You'll get some fuzzy looks

  13. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by jerby View Post
    the real fun starts when you jump while doing it

    I did/had to do it 2-3 times in a row in one rally (the level higher player was always a step ahead )
    You'll get some fuzzy looks
    I happen to play it sometime . I can either flick to the other backhand side, or backhand cross court drop. Playing a shot while turning 180 on air, this looks cool , but infact I am in trouble. This shot never helps me neutralize the situation, because of the slow recovery move that it requires. The forehand side is then hugely vulnerable.

  14. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gollum View Post
    Then don't play it. It's far too ambitious.

    Even at the world-class level, players don't often play a full-court cross-court backhand clear. And when they do, it often gets them in trouble.
    Yes Gollum, I agreed it's too ambitious, therefore I described it in an exaggerated fashion. My point is to highlight the difficulty to master this shot to other BC users.

    But, yes I hardly see professionals play this type of shot except before the rally point system.
    The rally point system is very attack oriented.
    Right now, a backhand clear is an invitation for a jump smash (supporting your point). Drives are the prefered counter to clears now. (agreed with the subsequent posting)

  15. #117
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    I just realized how much fun and how easy it is to get rediculously tight and sharp drops using inside and outside slices; I was practising with a partner who was standing at the net and feeding, and he couldn't even smash them down from where he was standing . It was so cool when the birds kept sliding down the opposite side of the net .

  16. #118
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    A disadvantage of a high backhand clear is that you forced to have your back facing the net, thus not being able to see the court as well. That and the time it takes to face the net again makes you vulnerable to a jump smash.

  17. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by taneepak View Post
    A disadvantage of a high backhand clear is that you forced to have your back facing the net, thus not being able to see the court as well. That and the time it takes to face the net again makes you vulnerable to a jump smash.
    Maybe they should allow two-racquet badminton (like in sword fights).
    With a racquet in each hand, there would be no more backhands.

    Of course, one would need a high level of ambidexterity

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