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  1. #1
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    Question shuttle is behind u, backhand side.

    Im 21, between beginner and intermediate player. I play singles a lot and i find with players better than me, they sometimes are able to hit the birdie past me on my backhand side (right handed). I'm just not too sure as to what to do with the birdie at this point.

    Generally my backhand isn't bad, i use a forehand grip when shuttle is in front of me on my backhand side and i can get quite good power with it but what grip do i use when the shuttle is behind me on backhand side?

    How should i position myself when the shuttle gets behind me on my backhand side?

    Also what kinda shot should i play, a clear, a drop shot or are there other options? Is is possible to do a cross tight drop shot from that angle? That would be cool.

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    Also what kinda shot should i play, a clear, a drop shot or are there other options? Is is possible to do a cross tight drop shot from that angle? That would be cool.
    I know that's often pretty difficult because your usually already under pressure when you have to play a backhand shot behind your head, but Imo you should always try to vary your shots, or else you become very predictable. If you always tend to drop after a deep backhand shot, your opponent will probably notice this after some rallies.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gingerphil79 View Post
    How should i position myself when the shuttle gets behind me on my backhand side?
    You don't really have much choice! A round-the-head forehand is feasible if the shuttle is only slightly behind you, but it's a difficult move, mainly used for interception in the midcourt; and once the shuttle is farther behind you, or farther to the side, you must play a backhand. Your racket foot will need to step towards the corner as you turn your back to the net. The grip will need to move towards panhandle to keep the racket facing square-on on impact (the thumb will be on the side bevel).

    Also what kinda shot should i play, a clear, a drop shot or are there other options? Is is possible to do a cross tight drop shot from that angle? That would be cool.
    Theoretically, you could play a clear, drop, or smash; and all of these could be straight, cross-court, or to the centre.

    Those are the logical possibilities; but only a godlike player would be able to play an effective backhand smash from this position. Even in professional games, players generally struggle to play an effective backhand clear from well behind them in the rearcourt (let alone a smash).

    When the shuttle is behind you on the backhand side, you only have two realistic options: clear or drop. The drop could go straight or cross (straight is easier) or to the middle; but the clear should only be played straight, because you are unlikely to be able to muster enough power to clear cross-court (and the subsequent cross-court recovery will be harder).

    Don't play the clear at all, however, unless you can get a good length. Most of the time a good drop shot will be better; granted, it puts you at a disadvantage because the opponent can anticipate it, but it's often the lesser of two evils. Bear in mind that you have the option of playing the drop cross-court, so your opponent could lose out badly if he over-anticipates the straight drop.

    There is one exception to this: if you sense that your opponent is unprepared for the clear, and perhaps is creeping forwards into the forecourt to anticipate a drop shot, then even a half-court clear can be a winning shot. Here, a very flat cross-court clear is often the best choice, capitalising on your opponent's over-anticipation of the straight drop. But you need to be very aware and alert to recognise this situation!

    Summary: a good drop shot is much better than a weak clear!

    Quote Originally Posted by THEbaschti View Post
    you should always try to vary your shots, or else you become very predictable.
    Being predictable is better than losing the rally immediately! In an ideal world we would be able to play four shots: straight drop or clear, and cross-court drop or clear. In a fantasy world, we could even play six shots: add the straight and cross-court smashes.

    In the real world, most players struggle to play a clear at all from such a desperate position; and even the professionals often fail to get enough depth (especially on the tempting but often ruinous cross-court). Having the choice of two drop shot angles is enough to keep you in the rally, providing your drops are accurate.

    I don't mean to suggest that you should give up practising backhand clears when the shuttle is behind you. Quite the contrary: the farther back you can manage a clear from, the better. But there will come a point where you cannot manage it, no matter how good you are.
    Last edited by Gollum; 08-27-2007 at 11:32 AM.

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    What you always have is a hierarchy of shot options.

    1. Can you winning shot?
    2. Can you setup a winning shot?
    3. Can you gain the attack?
    4. Can you keep the opponent from attacking?
    5. Can you get yourself out of immediate danger?
    6. Can you get it over?

    So for your particular situation
    1. not likely
    2. not likely
    3. unlikely - very smartly placed dropshot
    4. maybe - deep clear, well placed dropshot
    5. probably - a drop shot he can get to early but below the net
    6. probably - anything else

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    Regular Member Mark A's Avatar
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    You've described probably the most difficult position to hit from in the game! What I normally do is turn my back to the net at the same time as taking the swing. This has two benefits:

    1. Extra snap from the torso twist;
    2. Turning away from the net brings your shoulder further back and allows more power.

    If you can, find footage of a pro performing this shot - they can explain it better than I can.

    As Gollum says, going for a clear from this position is riskier than a flat drive or drop, bit if you drop too often your opponent will begin to read it before long.

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    I agree with Gollum, Clears should be doable, but used sparsingly.

    My advice for the dropshot, practise slicing it a bit, the deception (and flightpath) are very beneficial.
    And, more importantly: don't hit the shot slowly!

    Yes, you're in a difficult situation, and your instinct probably tells you that hit a short dropshot, so your opponent won't be able to keep attacking. Chances are that with such slow shots your opponent has enough time to either kill it, or do a very good netshot...
    Now, If you were to hit it a tad faster (maybe slicing it a bit) and just focus on getting it low over the net (doens't metter if it lands midcourt) and almost drive it. In this scenario your opponent might be surpised, but even if he's not it's more difficult to kill a drive/drop-shot and a very short netshot is also more difficult.
    You won't get out of trouble immediatly, but it's a safe option and definatly a shot to consider.

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    I agree with Jerby. Fast slice shot, somewhat like a drive is my favorite response when the shuttle gets behind me - both forehand and back hand side. There is one thing I would like to add: The next return from your opponent is most likely a drop, so after the shot, position yourself to run to the net (it's like preparing for a sprint), but just stay there waiting for the return. If you rush to the net too early, your opponent's flick would defenitely win him a point.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jerby View Post
    And, more importantly: don't hit the shot slowly!
    Good point. Aim the drop to land around the short service line, not falling close to the net. You cannot allow your opponent to play a tight, tumbling net shot, which will be much easier if he can take the shuttle near the tape (after a slow drop).

    The more pressure you're under at the back, the more you need to make the hitting movement part of the recovery, without a pause: "drag" your arm through the shot and turn your body back around in one fluid movement, beginning your movement back towards the forecourt.

    The slight catch is that, by failing to include a brief intermediate "pausing step" after the recovery turn, it can be harder to cope with flicks to the rearcourt. Nonetheless this immediate, somewhat committal "turning out" movement is necessary unless you want him to crucify you with a net shot.

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    well, if he/she does flick, you're just back to square one
    maybe this time in a better position.

    Being ready for netshots seems way more important in this scenario, especially because your opponent thinks you're already on the ropes. Flicking it back will only occur If you're already standing at your base by the time he hits. If you are you either hit a too slow back, or you're fast enough or you were never in too much trouble to begin with

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    as for the grip, if the shuttle is behind you on the backhand side, your thumb should be along sideways of the racket grip

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    Quote Originally Posted by jerby View Post
    well, if he/she does flick, you're just back to square one
    maybe this time in a better position.
    True, except that the really damaging flick will go to the forehand corner. This is one way for the opponent to take advantage: if he forces you to commit somewhat to recovering forwards (otherwise the net shot will win), then he can upset your movement rhythm with a shallow flick to the forehand rear corner. If his timing is right, then you will just be beginning to travel forwards when he hits the flick; changing your direction will be difficult.

    On the other hand, he might just give away his advantage, if he misjudges this shot, or you guess it's coming. Moreover, he will have much less scope for playing this shot after a fast drop shot (less time to hold and flick, so less opportunity to control your rhythm). Overall, he would probably be wise just to play the simple net shot.
    Being ready for netshots seems way more important in this scenario
    I agree. You must sacrifice some readiness for the forehand rear corner, in order to cover the impending net shot. Again, it's the lesser of two evils.
    Last edited by Gollum; 08-28-2007 at 09:30 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gollum View Post
    Overall, he would probably be wise just to play the simple net shot.
    He can hold and play a cross court net shot, or (if he is really quick) he can play a flat drive to your body. In either case, it is very hard to play a decent lift/clear to his rear court - then, expect a winning smash .

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    Quote Originally Posted by huynd View Post
    He can hold and play a cross court net shot, or (if he is really quick) he can play a flat drive to your body. In either case, it is very hard to play a decent lift/clear to his rear court - then, expect a winning smash .
    A flat drive to the body is impossible after a good fast drop shot, because the speed of the fast drop shot should force him to reach it after it has dropped below net height (so he must hit the shuttle upwards).

    The only way he can play a drive to the body is if he anticipates the straight drop and positions himself well forwards into the forecourt. In this case, you can play a cross-court drop shot instead, or a weak clear (preferably cross-court). Either of these should be a winning shot (if you are alert enough to spot what he's doing, which isn't easy with your back to the net! That's why you should delay the turn until the last moments).

    The fast drop shot will make it much more difficult for him to hold the shot (he doesn't have time to hold it). He can still play a cross-court net shot, and it could be a good option; but the cross-court loses much of its venom when he can't take the shuttle near the tape: he will be forced to play it deeper into court, and travelling upwards somewhat (think of the angles and shuttle height). This gives you slightly more time.

    Compare this to when you've played a slow drop shot. Here, the opponent has a full selection of deadly replies: a tight, spinning straight net shot; a tight cross-court net shot, landing inside the service line; or a very flat lift/drive, preferably heading for the opposite rear corner (forehand corner).

    Even if he doesn't reach it quite early enough for the lift/drive, he can always play a tight hairpin straight net shot, which will be extremely difficult to retrieve. By playing the fast drop shot instead of the slow drop shot, you reduce his attacking options considerably.
    Last edited by Gollum; 08-28-2007 at 12:37 PM.

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    Smile

    Wow, thanks for all the replys'. Really good stuff. Please keep on posting. All replies are gratefully received

    I normally play either fast or slow straight drops in which i get caught quite often with the net shot.

    I see my problem is the slow drop and hitting the shuttle too close to net. I will try and drive it more next time to the service line which will make the net shot more difficult.

    Also just to mention it, i was hitting a shuttle about for fun just with my bro who cant play to save his life but i seemed to have gotten the backhand smash figured out. Its class. I got quite a bit of power with it too so im well pleased.

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    Quote Originally Posted by drifit View Post
    Sure, you can hit the shuttle from between your legs...

    ...if you want to lose.

  17. #17
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    I'd like to see you clear it like that

    It's funny when it works...but hardly a solution

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