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  1. #1
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    Arrow I need help now!! -How does badminton benefit you?

    I am planning to do an informative speech on how badminton benefits your body for one of my class. Unfortunately, most of the stuff I've searched up are what technique to use to benefit the badminton players themselves. Anyone know where to find info on, say which muscle groups playing badminton will help?

    Thank you

  2. #2
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    it really strengthens your legs, and it is aerobic excersise to me

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    Badminton provides aerobic exercise and some leg strengthening, as well as less pronounced fitness benefits in other areas.

    But it also carries a risk of injury. Shoulder, knee, and ankle injuries are common; shoulder and knee injuries tend to be overuse injuries, whereas ankle injuries are often sprains. Another badminton injury, although less common, is damage to the Achilles tendon (sometimes a complete rupture).

    These risks should not be trivialised. There are much better forms of exercise than badminton: both in terms of safety, and in terms of physical adaptation. So runs the old adage: get fit to play badminton, rather than playing badminton to get fit.

    I regulary take part in an activity that most people would deem high-risk: "extreme caving" (that's what a TV programme would call it. I call it "expedition caving"). I've had far worse injuries from badminton, "soft" sport though it may be, than I have from my death-defying jaunts underground.
    Last edited by Gollum; 01-21-2008 at 08:01 AM.

  4. #4
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    In terms of benefits there are many others especially in terms of personal development. Our Junior Club started 3 years ago with players ranging in ages from 8 -15. The majority of them are still active members and those that have moved away to University have joined the Uni Team.

    Benefits

    1) A sense of belonging
    2) Playing as part of a team
    3) Increase in confidence, learning to cope with nerves
    4) Respecting others
    5) Sportsmanship
    6) Continual development - passing on knowledge to others
    7) Assisting in coaching activities
    8)

  5. #5
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    Badminton is a very balance-centric support. As a result, badminton players develop a keen sense of where they are in space. This skill is not only great for everyday skills that require hand-eye coordination, but also general balance.

    As Gollum mentioned, there are many forms of exercise and badminton is probably too injurious to be considered 'the best' from a cardio or strength perspective. Nevertheless, it still aids greatly in the development of lean muscle, and badminton players have quite high lung capacities when compared to athletes at a similar level from other sports (I'd cite the study I found this from but I really can't remember what it was called or who the authors were, sorry).

    A huge advantage for badminton players is that it can be played at a recreational level for most of your life. Many impact sports (football, hockey, basketball) are too difficult for people to play into middle and old age. However, badminton is a fun way for older persons to keep up fitness while minimizing traumatic injuries, although injuries from overtraining are still quite common.

    Hope that was helpful!

  6. #6
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    • One arm gets stronger than the other
    • One leg gets stronger than the other
    • The other leg gets "springier"
    • Shoulders tend to get internally rotated, scapulae elevated

    The moral? Don't play sports to get fit. Do it because it's fun.

    As for the above, it might be necessary to perform certain exercises to "undo" the damage and dysfunction from playing badminton.

  7. #7
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    Social and mental aspect of it. All the less directly physical stuff like enforcing the need for hard work etc.

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    learning how to not wet yourself at 29 all, third set. badminton helps a lot with mentality, and you can apply it to other aspects of life. for example, after having played and watched team matches that go into setting too many times to remember, i managed to handle a driving test easily, because i've been used to thinking "one mistake and it's over" and still control the pressure.

    but it's benefited me the most by making me get off my butt, dragging myself to a court, and sweating it out, rather than sitting at home, turning stupid and lazy in front of a computer. and i have fun out of it.

    it might pay to have some pictures of proper badminton, so your class doesn't think badminton is fairy tennis.

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    The moral? Don't play sports to get fit. Do it because it's fun.
    Exactly.

    Badminton is much better than many sports in this respect, but it's still a poor way to acquire fitness.

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    Which course is this for? Now that I think of it, the negative physical aspects of competitive sports would make for a very interesting topic. For example, even something as simple as running can mess with your body if you don't manage the volume right.

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    You shd be able to get it from your BA. I recommend you to do the coaching course so that you teach the correct thing. SBA does teach their coaches and am sure all affiliated with BWF will have one. Did you check the library? Should be similar to squash or any other racket sports. Doesn't have to be too specific.

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    It's good for the soul... ^.^

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    Stress relief, especially if you can smash. Hammertime baby!

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