User Tag List

Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 LastLast
Results 35 to 51 of 90
  1. #35
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Ottawa
    Posts
    1,110
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    What are your thoughts on acid buffers e.g. sodium bicarbonate?

  2. #36
    Regular Member volcom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    3,505
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nutrioutlet View Post
    Hello Volcom,

    In a word - Yes!

    Creatine is used in just about every sport there is. Why? Because for most people it works and is totally legal!! Creatine taken before, after and sometimes during your training session or match, can help your endurance levels and replenish the creatine phosphate* in your ATP stores* It also helps repair broken down muscle tissue, can improve mental focus, stamina and build lean muscle mass.

    The only negatives I have heard about creatine is that some people do not feel any effect from it. I believe that this may be due to their body not being very responsive due to an unhealthy diet ect... I also heard that it can give some people a poorly tummy, although this again is only found in very few people. I would suggest taking 5g a day for anyone wanting to start supplementing with creatine. But remember to enough water for your bodyweight and activity level!!

    *Creatine phosphate is a high energy phosphate molecule that is stored in cells and can be used to immediately resynthesis ATP.
    *Adenosine Triphosphate: The body's energiser. An organic compound present in muscle fibres that is broken down through a variety of enzymatic processes. The resultant spark of energy released stimulates hundreds of microscopic filaments within each cell, trigering muscle contractions.

    Hope this helps

    Nutrioutlet
    Thanks Nutrioutles!! Your advice is very very helpful

  3. #37
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Shanghai/London
    Posts
    364
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    OK, here's a question for you. I normally finish playing badminton and get home about 10.30 or 11.00 and I probably go to bed about 11.30 or 12.00

    What are the consequences of having nothing to eat during that time (assuming I had a proper meal before playing)? If I should eat, what should it be both before I go to sleep and for breakfast the next day?

  4. #38
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Stockton, California
    Posts
    515
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Hi. I just started badminton again and played for around 12 hours during an awakeathon at my school. I think I've must of overused my shoulder and is hurting. I'm pretty sure its not muscle but the joints. It hurts when I stretch my arm up. I am already taking Equate's glucosamine chondroitin with MSM twice a day to help it. What else should I do in terms of exercises for it to heal faster, and prevent further injury? I've been doing these exercises:

    http://www.pponline.co.uk/encyc/uppe...-exercise.html

    http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com...exercises.html

    On the second website I did mostly External Rotation, because some other guy on the site says that shoulder elevation, internal rotation and internal protraction is bad. While shoulder depression, external rotation, external retraction, and scapular retraction are good. Is this correct and how should I do the exercises? Thanks so much for being on BC.

  5. #39
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    London area, UK
    Posts
    3,879
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    KazeCloud, you need to start treating your injury seriously.

    Taking joint supplements and reading websites is wishful thinking. You need a doctor (preferably a sports specialist).

    By faffing around on the internet, you are delaying confronting the issue. Few people here, if any, are qualified to assess your injury; and none can give you a medical examination over TCP/IP.

    Information on internet forums is unreliable. You have no idea who these people are. That's fine if you're just trying out different badminton techniques, or buying a racket; but when your long-term health is at stake, you'd be wise not to rely on the internet as your only (or primary) source of information.

    See a damn doctor!

  6. #40
    New Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    mississauga
    Posts
    3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    i find this very interesting, ive been looking for a diet for badminton all over internet but cudnt find 1. Anyways first ill introduce my current diet. in morning i usually eat cereals with a bowl of milk or pouridge. In evening i usually eat 2 pita breads with sum chicken(roasted, fried, etc) or i eat sum chopped beef. Basically i eat meat 6 days in a week n 1 day perhaps sum vegetables. in dinner i eat pita breads with sum meat again or sometimes rice n vegetables. I know i need more vegetables in my diet but cud u tell me what i shud eat in morning lunch and dinner? i need a perfect guide i cud follo cuz my mom is willing to buy me all the things i need but she jus doesnt know what she shud get for me to have a healthy diet. thnks in advance. i play badminton once a week cuz in my school they arent very active or enthusiastic abt badminton. I workout once a day for 10-20 minutes. i also walk 80-90 minutes everyday except weekends.

  7. #41
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Stockton, California
    Posts
    515
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Thanks for you concern Gollum. I'll try and schedule and appointment, but my parents work at office hours and its going to be hard for them to leave early. The western doctors always just prescribe pain killers anyways. Taking my Glucosomine tablets and resting seems to be working, there is much less pain.

    I'll also try to ask some P.E teachers, since I heard they all major in biology and is probably well informed about physical activities.
    Last edited by KazeCloud; 02-02-2008 at 11:42 PM.

  8. #42
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Singapore Also Can
    Posts
    11,734
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Omar_Zangetsu View Post
    i find this very interesting, ive been looking for a diet for badminton all over internet but cudnt find 1. Anyways first ill introduce my current diet. in morning i usually eat cereals with a bowl of milk or pouridge. In evening i usually eat 2 pita breads with sum chicken(roasted, fried, etc) or i eat sum chopped beef. Basically i eat meat 6 days in a week n 1 day perhaps sum vegetables. in dinner i eat pita breads with sum meat again or sometimes rice n vegetables. I know i need more vegetables in my diet but cud u tell me what i shud eat in morning lunch and dinner? i need a perfect guide i cud follo cuz my mom is willing to buy me all the things i need but she jus doesnt know what she shud get for me to have a healthy diet. thnks in advance. i play badminton once a week cuz in my school they arent very active or enthusiastic abt badminton. I workout once a day for 10-20 minutes. i also walk 80-90 minutes everyday except weekends.
    I thought you should take a balanced diet EVERYDAY!

    You seem to like meat a lot but don't like vegetables. Meat, especially lean meat will provide the protein for building especially your muscle I suppose, but FRUITS and vegetables are also important to give you a variety of vitamins necessary for a more thorough development of your body. You seem to be missing out a great deal on the latter.

    Your breakfast seem to me to be okay and if you can last your day's activities without fatigue, it would appear you had enough calories of cabohydrates found in your bread and rice. Each of us is different and depending on our build, the type of activities we perform, we consume differently in amounts and variety.

    Just my general observation but I'm sure nutrioutlet will be able to give a better advice.

    BTW, where is your place? Mississauga - which country I mean?

  9. #43
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Singapore Also Can
    Posts
    11,734
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Hi nutiroutlet

    I referred to one of your links and saw a picture of a powerful lady just above another of a man doing weightlifting.

    Could I assume the lady is you and that you are into weightlifting as well?

    I know there are different weight classes in this sport and wonder which class you belong if you're indeed into weightlifting.

    This sport is a test of strength and strength mainly comes from your muscles, apart from technique. Is it why you recommend whey and creatine above all else?

    What happens if a weightbuilder or a bodybuilder should stop training. Will his muscle let him down and his body will turn into a 'sagging' look? What is the minimum that such an athlete should do to make sure this will not happen?

  10. #44
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    6,527
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    The following is about nutrition from the "Fundamentals of Sports Injury Management" jointly written by 3 people, namely the Director, Athletic Training Program, Bridgewater College, Massachusetts, an Assistant Professor, Dept of Movement Arts Health Promotion of the same college, and a Professor of Biomechanics, California State University, Northridge, California :
    QUESTION : Think for a minute or two how nutrition can influence the repair and healing process of damaged tissue. Can an individual return to peak performance without the necessary energy sources?

    ANSWER : Proper nutrition for an active individual is essential to provide the necessary nutrients to perform work. In addition, extended inactivity can result in a slight weight gain, placing additional stress on injured joint structures. As such, cardiovascular endurance activities should be initiated as soon as possible to simply burn calories.
    Carbohydrates are the main energy fuel for the body. In addition, the brain uses blood glucose almost exclusively as its fuel and does not have a stored supply of this nutrient. Although fat does provide a large store of potential energy and serves as a cushion to protect the vital organs and provide thermal insulation, it has little function in wound healing. Proteins serve a vital role in the maintenance, repair, and growth of body tissues. When carbohydrates reserves are low, the synthesis of glucose will draw upon protein, thus further draining the body's protein "stores", especially muscle protein. In extreme conditions, this can lead to a reduction in lean tissue and place an excessive load on the kidneys as they excrete the nitrogen-containing by-products of protein breakdown. Without an adequate supply of carbohydrate and protein intake, repair and healing of damaged tissues will be prolonged.
    Vitamins also play an important role in wound healing. Riboflavin (vitamin B2), pyridoxine, (vitamin B6), pantothenic acid, folacin, and vitamin B12 all aid in energy metabolism. Vitamin C maintains the intercellular matrix of cartilage, bone, and dentine, and is required for collagen secretion. A lack of vitamin C can result in deficient wound healing, evident in inferior vascularization and scanty collagen deposition. Vitamin A is necessay to maintain epithelial tissue and vitamin D promotes growth and mineralization of bones and aids in the absorption of calcium. Vitamin E prevents cell damage, and vitamin K is essential in blood clotting.
    Calcium aids in blood clotting and, coupled with sodium, is necessary for proper nerve function. Zinc is known to promote faster healing. Water is essential to transport nutrients, control thermoregulation, and aid in metabolic reactions.
    The food guide pyramid now recommends that a diet should be high in fruits, vegetables, and grains and low in fat and sugar. Under normal circumstances, this diet should provide an adequate source of carbohydrates, protein, fat, vitamins, minerals, and water to promote wound healing and prevent unnecessary weight gain. Dietary supplements are not necessary if the individual's diet is nutritionally balanced.
    In short, an injured individual must have an adequate diet that provides the nutrients necessary to enhance wound healing. In addition, a diet high in carbohydrates should supply the energy necessary to compete on a highly competitive level.

  11. #45
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Ottawa
    Posts
    1,110
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    The food pyramid is a ridiculous nutrition guide. If you actually eat that many grains on a regular basis, your insulin sensitivity will be shot and you'll probably be kinda fat. Is it on there because it is really a fundamental food requirement or maybe it's because the agricultural industry has a lot of influence. Just consider that humans didn't eat grains at all during preagricultural times.

    How about dairy? How can it be essential to a good diet if so many people are lactose intolerant?

  12. #46
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    London area, UK
    Posts
    3,879
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KazeCloud View Post
    The western doctors always just prescribe pain killers anyways.
    You need to see better doctors then, or perhaps you just need to explain your circumstances better.

    Prescribing painkillers for a sports injury is a non-solution. They might as well say, "just don't play sport".

  13. #47
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    midlands, england
    Posts
    55
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    any ideas of a good way to put on some weight, feel the need for a bit more bulk to help my endurance. Any foods/supplements recommended for doing this?

  14. #48
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Thomson, Singapore.
    Posts
    3,729
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by crosscourt View Post
    OK, here's a question for you. I normally finish playing badminton and get home about 10.30 or 11.00 and I probably go to bed about 11.30 or 12.00

    What are the consequences of having nothing to eat during that time (assuming I had a proper meal before playing)? If I should eat, what should it be both before I go to sleep and for breakfast the next day?
    Feel lethargic the next day? Slow recovery from the previous day's session? Muscle loss (catabolism)????

    Some simple carbs (high GI) should be taken (40g-80g+, depending on individual and the intensity of exercise) immediately (or within 1 hour) after exercise to replenish your glycogen stores, which will also help speed up recovery and gives you energy. Some protein also aids in recovery.

    Breakfast should consist of complex carbs (low GI) that releases glucose more slowly and steadily.

    Of course not forgetting that everyone's daily diet should also include protein, healthy fats, fibre, vitamins and minerals which you can get from meat, fruits and vegetables.

  15. #49
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ipoh, Malaysia
    Posts
    1,992
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    i have been experiencing numbness in the shoulder and arm area and prickly sensation in the tips of my fingers after i wake up from sleep on my racket playing side. i think it is bad blood circulation. what can i do to improve blood circulation in my racket playing side? is there any supplement i can take for this?

  16. #50
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Stockton, California
    Posts
    515
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gollum View Post
    You need to see better doctors then, or perhaps you just need to explain your circumstances better.

    Prescribing painkillers for a sports injury is a non-solution. They might as well say, "just don't play sport".
    Exactly why I didn't want to see my doctor. Where would you go to find an experience sports physician...So I'm doing my best.

  17. #51
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    6,527
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stumblingfeet View Post
    The food pyramid is a ridiculous nutrition guide. If you actually eat that many grains on a regular basis, your insulin sensitivity will be shot and you'll probably be kinda fat. Is it on there because it is really a fundamental food requirement or maybe it's because the agricultural industry has a lot of influence. Just consider that humans didn't eat grains at all during preagricultural times.

    How about dairy? How can it be essential to a good diet if so many people are lactose intolerant?
    My diet is very close to that of the Food Pyramid, with different types of grain for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and my blood glucose is always between 4.7 to 4.9 mmol/l. I play badminton with players 10 to 50 years my junior and I can hold my own on cardiovascular fitness (doubles) with them. Twenty years ago when I was on more dairy products and meat I had difficulty on the fitness side, and by blood glucose was boderline 6.5 mmol/l and I used to have intense needle-like stabbing pains in my knees.
    The food pyramid is about a balanced diet. Yes, it is endorsed by the Dept of Agriculture and the Dept of Health & Services, both government entities. Yes, most Americans don't follow the food pyramid. That does not mean it is an incorrect representation of a balanced diet. The key is a balanced diet. A diet based on milk alone can result in a massive heart attack. There was such a case in England some years ago about a teenager who died of a heart attack from drinking massive quantities of milk. Of course milk is good but only in the proportion as indicated in the food pyramid.
    If anything, a balanced diet is very vital to any individual who plays sports. I wouldn't put my trust in any magic bottle or pill. Foods should provide all the 3 major nutrients, minerals, vitamins, water. A balanced diet, the food pyramid, is supposed to be that.

Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. before tournament nutrition. try it..
    By Daisuke in forum General Forum
    Replies: 7
    : 05-22-2008, 06:13 PM
  2. Nutrition during a tournament
    By freeheeler in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 26
    : 03-25-2008, 05:05 AM
  3. Proper nutrition and badminton (or other sports)
    By silentheart in forum General Forum
    Replies: 8
    : 04-11-2007, 01:14 AM
  4. Nutrition
    By |R|S in forum General Forum
    Replies: 4
    : 04-06-2005, 09:55 PM
  5. Daily nutrition
    By Zclyh3 in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 1
    : 03-03-2001, 07:20 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •