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  1. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by stumblingfeet View Post
    What are your thoughts on acid buffers e.g. sodium bicarbonate?
    As with all nutritional and sports supplements - MOST of them improve performance in some way.

    Acid buffers like sodium phosphate for example, may improve your performance, although I do have to admit, I have never tried this myself as a lactic acid neuraliser was never needed in my training. Although other people have tried it and use it every training session.

    What I have learnt about acid buffers is that they increase the enzyme that unloads oxygen into the muscle which in turn improves the use of glycogen as fuel. It is also said that they improve the production of energy in the ATP-CP (see above comment for explaination) and oxygen systems.

    If you would like more information regarding this let me know.

    If you did want to try an acid buffer - before spending your money on an expensive product - try putting a spoonful of bicarbonate of soda in your pre workout drink and see what effect it has on your training.

    Nutrioutlet

  2. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by crosscourt View Post
    OK, here's a question for you. I normally finish playing badminton and get home about 10.30 or 11.00 and I probably go to bed about 11.30 or 12.00

    What are the consequences of having nothing to eat during that time (assuming I had a proper meal before playing)? If I should eat, what should it be both before I go to sleep and for breakfast the next day?
    Hello Crosscourt

    It is good to hear that you are eating well before your training. The consequence of not eating after would be (amongst other things) that your body would find it difficult to repair the damage that your muscles occured during your training session or badminton match.

    I would reccomend having either a recovery drink, protein shake, tin of tuna, handful of cashew nuts ect... just so your muscles are fed and nurished. Failure to do so can result in muscle mass loss. Eating after training means your muscles will repair quicker which in turn can improve your badminton game.

    As for breakfast the next day, i would advise you on a good nutritional programme. For more information contact me.

    Nutrioutlet

  3. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by KazeCloud View Post
    Hi. I just started badminton again and played for around 12 hours during an awakeathon at my school. I think I've must of overused my shoulder and is hurting. I'm pretty sure its not muscle but the joints. It hurts when I stretch my arm up. I am already taking Equate's glucosamine chondroitin with MSM twice a day to help it. What else should I do in terms of exercises for it to heal faster, and prevent further injury? I've been doing these exercises:

    http://www.pponline.co.uk/encyc/uppe...-exercise.html

    http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com...exercises.html

    On the second website I did mostly External Rotation, because some other guy on the site says that shoulder elevation, internal rotation and internal protraction is bad. While shoulder depression, external rotation, external retraction, and scapular retraction are good. Is this correct and how should I do the exercises? Thanks so much for being on BC.
    Kazecloud,

    I agree with Gollum, this sort of thing must been seen by a sports physician. The internet is a great way to find out information, but, when it comes to matters of this nature, I can only advise a one on one session.

    As for products that can ASISST with your recovery; Whey protein, glucosamine, a good joint supplement, EFA's and Amino Acids. I would suggest that you gain advice from your physician as to quantities ect... as he/she will know the extent of your injury.

    Do go and see a specialist!

    Nutrioutlet

  4. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Omar_Zangetsu View Post
    i find this very interesting, ive been looking for a diet for badminton all over internet but cudnt find 1. Anyways first ill introduce my current diet. in morning i usually eat cereals with a bowl of milk or pouridge. In evening i usually eat 2 pita breads with sum chicken(roasted, fried, etc) or i eat sum chopped beef. Basically i eat meat 6 days in a week n 1 day perhaps sum vegetables. in dinner i eat pita breads with sum meat again or sometimes rice n vegetables. I know i need more vegetables in my diet but cud u tell me what i shud eat in morning lunch and dinner? i need a perfect guide i cud follo cuz my mom is willing to buy me all the things i need but she jus doesnt know what she shud get for me to have a healthy diet. thnks in advance. i play badminton once a week cuz in my school they arent very active or enthusiastic abt badminton. I workout once a day for 10-20 minutes. i also walk 80-90 minutes everyday except weekends.
    Hello Omar.

    A balanced diet is a very good way of increasing performance on the badminton court. Eating every 2-3 hours also is recommended for athletes as this can help regulate your blood sugar levels.

    Having a good nutritional programme is a great idea - especially if you have the support of your family Researching into sports performance nutrition is also advised as knowing what is in your diet is a great way to get ahead in your game. You can get sports nutritional programmes specially written for you - this is a great way to start as following a generic plan may not work for you as every person is different, has different needs, wants, goals ect...

    Hope this helps

    Nutrioutlet

  5. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loh View Post
    Hi nutiroutlet

    I referred to one of your links and saw a picture of a powerful lady just above another of a man doing weightlifting.

    Could I assume the lady is you and that you are into weightlifting as well?

    I know there are different weight classes in this sport and wonder which class you belong if you're indeed into weightlifting.

    This sport is a test of strength and strength mainly comes from your muscles, apart from technique. Is it why you recommend whey and creatine above all else?

    What happens if a weightbuilder or a bodybuilder should stop training. Will his muscle let him down and his body will turn into a 'sagging' look? What is the minimum that such an athlete should do to make sure this will not happen?
    Hello Loh

    Yes that is myself and my husband (Also a world champion powerlifter). Both strength athletes, although I am training for a different sport at the moment and have been involved in many sports in my career. Please note weightlifting, powerlifting and bodybuilding are all very different sports. In the same light it is like calling badminton - tennis!!

    Whey and creatine are NOT just for strength athletes. The benefits of the two have been proven, study after study, to provide performance enhancement for nearly every single sport. Creatine as I have said in previous posts is the most widely used sports supplement WHY?? BECAUSE IT REALLY WORKS! It is not just for strength gains - please refer to previous posts for explanation.

    Strength sports give a fantastic insight into how the body responds to certain activities. Depending on the competition/event depicts how you alter your training and nutrition, which is why many successful strength athletes go into the world of training and nutrition advising other sports how to improve their performances.

    To answer your question regarding weightlifters and bodybuilders, it is very rare for either of the two (baring in mind the two are very different) to just stop training. If bodybuilders wanted to decrease their muscle mass, they would change their nutrition and training to have the desired effect on their body. It also depends on the actual person as to what he/she decides to do. As I have said before, it is the goal that is very important.

    Any athlete, including badminton players, that stops training will indefinately loose muscle mass, strength and skills. This DOES NOT mean they will look saggy! It is a combination of diet AND training alteration, and being aware of your bodies changes.

    Hope this answers your question

    Nutrioutlet

  6. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loh View Post
    I thought you should take a balanced diet EVERYDAY!

    You seem to like meat a lot but don't like vegetables. Meat, especially lean meat will provide the protein for building especially your muscle I suppose, but FRUITS and vegetables are also important to give you a variety of vitamins necessary for a more thorough development of your body. You seem to be missing out a great deal on the latter.

    Your breakfast seem to me to be okay and if you can last your day's activities without fatigue, it would appear you had enough calories of cabohydrates found in your bread and rice. Each of us is different and depending on our build, the type of activities we perform, we consume differently in amounts and variety.

    Just my general observation but I'm sure nutrioutlet will be able to give a better advice.

    BTW, where is your place? Mississauga - which country I mean?

    Yup its mississauga. So far im in erindale high school and best at badminton and undefeated for grade 10.

  7. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by nutrioutlet View Post
    Hello Crosscourt

    It is good to hear that you are eating well before your training. The consequence of not eating after would be (amongst other things) that your body would find it difficult to repair the damage that your muscles occured during your training session or badminton match.

    I would reccomend having either a recovery drink, protein shake, tin of tuna, handful of cashew nuts ect... just so your muscles are fed and nurished. Failure to do so can result in muscle mass loss. Eating after training means your muscles will repair quicker which in turn can improve your badminton game.

    As for breakfast the next day, i would advise you on a good nutritional programme. For more information contact me.

    Nutrioutlet

    thanks Nutrioutlet and you modious.

  8. #59
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    hi there, one of my friends (not a member on here)is diabetic (type 1) he plays badminton but thinks because he has to eat constantly when playing it affects his skills. it also effects his weight and has made him gain. what will be a safe way of losing this weight and how can he have a diet that will not affect his ability to play. thanks xxxx

  9. #60
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    I drink chocolate milk to replenish my energy. Always works lol! I also saw chocolate milk being mentionned in the newspaper, to be a great drink to replenish energy.

  10. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big L4 View Post
    I drink chocolate milk to replenish my energy. Always works lol! I also saw chocolate milk being mentionned in the newspaper, to be a great drink to replenish energy.
    Chocolate is a mix of many ingredients with the base ingredient cocoa. It is unlikely you are getting any energy from cocoa. Quick energy comes from very high GI carbs and no. 1 on the list is plain glucose with a little water or glucose cubes, next sugar cubes. However, cocoa is a super food for your cardiovascular system.

  11. #62
    Regular Member chris-ccc's Avatar
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    Exclamation "Slow-energy releasing" foods versus "Fast-energy releasing" foods

    Quote Originally Posted by taneepak View Post

    Chocolate is a mix of many ingredients with the base ingredient cocoa. It is unlikely you are getting any energy from cocoa. Quick energy comes from very high GI carbs and no. 1 on the list is plain glucose with a little water or glucose cubes, next sugar cubes. However, cocoa is a super food for your cardiovascular system.

    .
    Perhaps Nutrioutlet could list for us the "slow-energy releasing" foods, and the "fast-energy releasing" foods.

    What should we eat on the day before our tournament, and what should we eat on tournament day?
    .

  12. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by chris@ccc View Post
    .
    Perhaps Nutrioutlet could list for us the "slow-energy releasing" foods, and the "fast-energy releasing" foods.

    What should we eat on the day before our tournament, and what should we eat on tournament day?
    .
    The only healthy source of energy comes from carbohydrates, which converts to glucose, the raw material of energy. Carbs in their natural state are generally energy slow-releasing and processed carbs are more likely to be fast-releasing. The fastest is glucose, followed by sugar, syrup, honey, sweets, white bread and white rice. Grains that are wholegrain like wholegrain rice, wholemeal flour, pot barley, oats flakes, whole buckwheat, rye, spaghetti from wholewheat durum are all super slow-release carbs. Also cooking carbs too long like porridge rice is more fast-releasing than ordinary way of cooking.
    If all glucose from carbs are used up the body gets it from fat and protein conversion, which is not a healthy way.
    Your source of energy in sports must be from carbs and carbs only. If you are into intense competition do it like Peter Gade-Carbs loading. Carbs loading simply means storing more energy-giving carbs in your body with a simple diet routine that you could normally store in an ordinary diet.

  13. #64
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    Yeah, Slow energy releasing food can either be
    1) Low GI Carbs
    2) Non Carb energy source such as Protein and Fat.
    I do think getting energy from Protein & Fat alone can be quite extreme. Not very sure what kinda shock it will do to your system.
    Real sugar blood levels dropping can be quite dangerous i heard from some friends who tried and ultimately failed on the Atkins.

    Cocoa is a popular source for Dopamine. It's a kind of natural hormone that gets ppl feeling perky. Some ppl call it a drug LOL.
    So even if you don't quite get the energy per se from Cocoa itself... the perkiness effect it gives might be the 'lift' u need for sports prep.

    Chocalate milk is also normaly 'sweetened' with sugar. That would explain the 'energy' aspect of the drink.

    The Durian is also another 'strong' source for Dopamine. No wonder ppl get addicted to it!
    Last edited by jug8man; 02-05-2008 at 01:36 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by KazeCloud View Post
    Exactly why I didn't want to see my doctor. Where would you go to find an experience sports physician...So I'm doing my best.
    First, can you ask to see a different doctor? Can you ask about who has a specialism in sports injury? I saw several doctors at my local practice, and one of them referred me to a colleague who was a sports specialist.

    Second, can you see a physiotherapist?

    It's easy to get into the "well, I tried" mindset. I've been there myself; part of my motivation for saying, "well, I tried" was that I didn't want to confront the issue. If you give up after a few tries, maybe you're not committed enough to taking care of your body.

    I agree it's frustrating. These things should be easily available. All doctors should have a better understanding of sports injuries, at least to the extent that they know when to refer you to someone more knowledgeable.

    But when it's not easy, you have to compensate by putting in the effort (and money, often). My free (national health service) physiotherapy was insufficient, so I went private as well. That's cost me 115 ($230) so far, for three sessions; for me, that's quite a lot of money. But it's worth it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maltezerzz View Post
    hi there, one of my friends (not a member on here)is diabetic (type 1) he plays badminton but thinks because he has to eat constantly when playing it affects his skills. it also effects his weight and has made him gain. what will be a safe way of losing this weight and how can he have a diet that will not affect his ability to play. thanks xxxx
    Hello Maltezerzz

    Exercise can have a significant effect of the control of your friends diabetes. Just to give you a few examples there are; lowering excess blood sugar levels, strengthening the muscles and heart, improving circulation and reducing stress - all of which I am sure your friend knows about. Playing badminton may also help reduce his excess weight.

    I would suggest however due to him having type I diabetes that he talk with his GP/physician about how much exercise he can do at any one given time, as this will change on how severe his diabetes is.

    As a personal trainer, there are guidelines we have to follow when training someone with diabetes, he may find those guidelines beneficial to follow whilst playing badminton with you.

    1, Suggest he sees his GP for a full medical examination before your next game together.

    2, Encorage him to monitor his blood sugar levels before, during and after your game. (This allows to see the effects his game has on his blood sugar levels) The ISSA (International Sports Science Association) state that clinical data suggests that it is safe to exercise if a diabetics blood sugar level is between 100 and 250 mg/dl - THIS MUST BE DISCUSSED WITH HIS DOCTOR!!

    3, Advise that he wears a heart rate monitor and keeps his heart rate between 55-85% of his maximum*

    4, It is suggested that diabetics with type I diabetes, exercise only for 20 -30 minutes per session.

    5, Exercise daily, (this doesn't mean a badminton game a day!!) regular consistant exercise patterns can help diabetics to more effectively balance their training with their diets and medications - thus being able to maintain blood sugar control.

    6, Play your game of badminton within one to two hours after a meal or snack (but no longer than 3 hours after a meal) whilst blood sugar levels are relatively high.

    7, Tell him to avoid playing badminton during periods of peak insulin activity or take special precautions. (e.g. 1, consume a light meal or carbohydrate snack, and 2, alter the insulin injection site to an area not primarily involved in the exercise - i.e the abdomen - to prevent exercise induced hypoglycemia)

    8, Tell your friend to always carry a form of fast acting carbohydrate eg: juice, soft drinks, candy, glucose tablets ect... in case of hypoglycemic emergency

    9, Be aware of the signs and symptoms and treatment of hypoglycemia, so that you can help your friend if you see any symptoms start to occur.

    10, Avoid playing in extreme heat, due to his increased susceptibilty to anhidrosis (failure of the sweating mechanism)

    * Maximum heart rate is found by deducting your age from 220. Example for a 40 year old man =
    220 - 40 = 180.
    55% of 180 = 99 beats per minute
    85% of 180 = 153 beats per minute

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    how to reduce sweating? i sweat a lot and it make my grip wet...then its slippery and hard to play with...

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    Quote Originally Posted by malaikiat View Post
    how to reduce sweating? i sweat a lot and it make my grip wet...then its slippery and hard to play with...
    Sweating is a great sign that your body is working properly. So trying to reduce sweating through nutrition or training is not something that I would ever advise.

    What I do for fantastic grip is use climbers chalk and also a liquid chalk. This keeps your hands dry and also helps keep your grip. I would suggest you try the liquid chalk as it is a lot less messy.

    Hope that this helps?

    Nutrioutlet

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