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  1. #1
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    Default Shoulder injuries?

    To anyone with shoulder injuries? How did yours come about?
    Got mine from overuse and poor technique with my clears and smashes. Still not fully healed, any tips??

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    got dislocated shoulder which later develop into chronic aches and joint tendinitis. for me, only rest will help. usually take me 2-3 weeks of rest, physio and acupunture for the pain to go away.

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    i got tendon inflammation on my arm, meaning i played too hard. Doc said the only way is to rest. But accupuncture can ease the pain.
    occasionally, i rub chinese medicine oil and plasters on it to aid healing.

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    First, you have to mind the injury by having it rested. Meaning, not indulging to the sport until the pain on the shoulder dissappear. Second, look for somebody or a professional that can help you develop the proper technique of hitting the shuttle. Maybe devise a exercise regimen to develop the muscles in your arms. If you want some more tips with regards to your problem, just follow some threads posted in here. Maybe they could be of help.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlennDogg View Post
    Still not fully healed, any tips??
    Every injury is different.

    See your doctor. See a physiotherapist. Get a definitive medical assessment, rather than relying on casual advice.

    Be disciplined; do the exercises that are prescribed to you.

    For what it's worth, my shoulder injury has developed and (partially) healed over about two years so far. Here's an outline:
    • Gradual onset of mild pain in the shoulder
    • Consultation with doctors and physios. Put on waiting list for MRI scan
    • Follow an exercise programme specified by sports-specialist doctor, which reduces the pain
    • MRI scan reveals labral tear (cartilage)
    • Orthopaedic clinic recommends surgery. 6 month waiting list.
    • Keyhole surgery: SLAP repair and subacromial decompression (repair cartilage and shave away some excess bone). The cartilage damage turned out to be much worse than the MRI suggested. My shoulder was fundamentally unstable!
    • 4 weeks in an arm sling, 24 hours a day.
    • Take off sling and begin rehab: shoulder can hardly move at all without excruciating pain. Gradually improve range of motion.
    • After about a month, begin theraband exercises and start to drive my car again.
    • After another month, I start to play badminton left-handed.
    • After another two months, I start weight training and start playing right-handed, but without any power shots (no smashes, clears, etc).
    That's the story so far. It's been over 5 months since the surgery and I'm only just playing right-handed again, and that only with soft shots.

    This process takes time. However much you might dread it, you need to start the process as early as possible, by pursuing a definitive medical evaluation of your injury.

    Your injury may not require surgery. But in any case, do not delay obtaining a proper diagnosis, and do not delay commencing treatment. In my case, the treatment was many-layered: I started with conservative treatment (exercises), and eventually had surgery after I discovered the true nature of my injury.

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    gollum - i'm sorry about your case. it sounded like the surgery caused more 'trouble' than it did good. i hope you'll be able to play competitive badminton again soon

    IMO, the one self is the body's best healer. that is why surgical interventions are not suggested unless it's the last resort.

    for someone with shoulder pain, (IMO) it's denitely worthwhile to consider:

    1. ample rest, to allow tissue repair
    2. seeking professional advice, be it a physiotherapist or sports therapist or even an osteopath
    3. sports massage...to aid recovery

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    no enough warm up is one of the factor. I got it in winter days. Try more wrist work or power.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mcchooi View Post
    gollum - i'm sorry about your case. it sounded like the surgery caused more 'trouble' than it did good. i hope you'll be able to play competitive badminton again soon

    IMO, the one self is the body's best healer. that is why surgical interventions are not suggested unless it's the last resort.

    for someone with shoulder pain, (IMO) it's denitely worthwhile to consider:

    1. ample rest, to allow tissue repair
    2. seeking professional advice, be it a physiotherapist or sports therapist or even an osteopath
    3. sports massage...to aid recovery
    This may not be the best advise but its the most logical and simple. We dont know the extent of the injury yet so no point exagerating it.

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    Shoulder and wrist pain in badminton is very coomon and is mainly due to poor technique and poor footwork. Striking the shuttle when in an awkward, off-balance position strains the joints.

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    gollum - i'm sorry about your case. it sounded like the surgery caused more 'trouble' than it did good. i hope you'll be able to play competitive badminton again soon
    Thanks for your "get well" message.

    But I believe the surgery was not only worthwhile, but essential. As I said, my shoulder was fundamentally unstable; the labrum was 75% detached from the glenoid. This needed fixing, even if the severity of the injury was not immediately apparent.

    I repeat: one must take the long term view with injuries. Some treatments (such as surgery) make them worse before they get better.

    Joint surgery often reduces the range of motion of the joint. In my case, that's a good thing: my right shoulder is now normally mobile, while my left remains freakishly hypermobile.

    Quote Originally Posted by taneepak
    Shoulder and wrist pain in badminton is very coomon and is mainly due to poor technique and poor footwork.
    ...or in my case, due to being born with a hypermobile shoulder.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gollum View Post
    the labrum was 75% detached from the glenoid

    ...or in my case, due to being born with a hypermobile shoulder.
    wow...was the acetabular labrum partially detached due to badminton play?

    are you male/female? it's just that i've 'somehow' always assumed that you're a male player (based on your username - don't know why...) it's fairly rare for men to have hypermobility...comparatively
    Last edited by mcchooi; 02-28-2008 at 10:18 AM.

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    It certainly isn't unusual for a badminton to have an excessively mobile racquet shoulder. Simple demonstration: abduct your arms 90 degrees out to the side and bend your elbow such that your forearm is parallel to your torso. Then, check out the range of motion for internal and external rotation. Typically, there is a huge difference in external rotation.

    Often, the meaning of this is that it is more difficult for your shoulder to hold itself in the best position to minimize stress concentration -> this in turn leads to injury.

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    I tore my rotator cuff serving in a game of tennis:

    Badminton smash technique + heavy tennis racquet = injury

    It was 5 years before I was finally given an operation to repair it and by that time my technique was ruined and I'd basically been injured in my prime - I was 21 when I got the injury and 26 when I had the operation. (yes, I am quite bitter about it)

    Make sure you've got a definite diagnosis and make sure action is taken.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mcchooi View Post
    wow...was the acetabular labrum partially detached due to badminton play?
    No, the acetabular labrum is in the hip. So far, my hips are fine.

    But yes, my glenoid labrum was partially detached from my glenoid fossa. They told me it was detached from "6 o'clock to 3 o'clock" (imagine a clock face). The "before and after" arthroscopic photos were pretty dramatic.

    are you male/female? it's just that i've 'somehow' always assumed that you're a male player (based on your username - don't know why...) it's fairly rare for men to have hypermobility...comparatively
    I'm male.

    When I stretch my left (non-racket) shoulder, I can make delicate people feel queasy. It's pretty bad. Thankfully, since surgery, the right shoulder no longer does that!

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