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  1. #35
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    if you are a right hander, the 'rim' mentioned should be the 9 to 11 o'clock of the frame.

    also, normally the shuttle should be pointing towards you when you pick it up. the other way is possible as well but i find it more tricky.

  2. #36
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    The shuttle can be picked up with any part of the racket head with the exception of possibly the 6 o'clock position since it is difficult to get that part of the frame low enough to scoop up the shuttle due to the size of the handle being too large to allow for the racket to lie perfectly flat.

    The most difficult contact position for successfully picking up the shuttle may be the 12 o'clock position of the frame as the standard flowing rotational motion used may become more of a digging motion due to the limitations of joint rotation in certain directions when using standard grips on the racket.

    Do not fret however-- picking up the shuttle using the 12 o'clock position of the racket head can be easily mastered though it is not recommended you start out employing this contact point as even if the shuttle is successfully retrieved, control tends to be inferior, where the primary determinant of control for picking up the shuttle is measured as the minimization of bounce of the shuttle on the racket strings during the retrieval process (one aims to master the art of picking up the shuttle with zero bounce). As a side note, the secondary determinant is the minimization of movement of the shuttle on the strings during retrieval (i.e. picking up the shuttle on certain main/cross strings and having it rest on them without the shuttle rolling around). Higher-order determinants may include scooping the shuttle along a specified path at a specified speed to reach a specified destination using one motion (i.e. without first having the shuttle come to rest).

    The 1 o'clock to 5 o'clock positions used are commonly referenced as picking it up on the backhand though the shuttle can be retrieved using a backhand or forehand grip and using the forehand stringbed face or the backhand stringbed face. Similarly, the 7 o'clock to 11 o'clock positions are referenced as forehand retrievals. The 12 o'clock position is symmetrical so does not fall into either category though many would suggest it belongs in the forehand category.

    Picking up the shuttle takes different lengths of training for different individuals. Do not be discouraged if it takes you a few days, a few weeks or even a few months of constant, rigorous practice. It's all about dedication to the sport and perseverance.

    As mentioned earlier, the shuttle can be retrieved using mainly fingers, mainly wrist or a combination of both. Advantages of using primarily finger power include increased control in the sense of first and second determinants as outlined above though higher-order determinants would be difficult indeed. Due to the limits of finger power, it is less likely excessive power will be used in scooping the shuttle thus preventing the shuttle from bouncing on the strings and/or falling off. A clenched fist also reduces the potential for excess power being used but may still result in the shuttle unsuccessfully being picked up if an emphasis on proper scooping motion is not observed. The standard grips used in play may provide the most potential for successful control as measured by all of the determinants. For the former two methods it is best to apply high levels of pressure throughout the scooping motion whereas for the latter it may be best to employ a relaxed wrist and then a contracted wrist at the moment of impact.

    Deception may be limited if using the finger methodology depending on the number of fingers used. If the racket is held only in the thumb and the index finger then it may be likely that slight alteration in the gripping position be made between the forehand and backhand retrievals. Thus for the purposes of deception-- maintaining the same grip position for forehand and backhand retrievals-- a minimum of two fingers and a thumb may be required.

    Visualization is important. See yourself scooping up the bird and the proper motion required. Almost any motion can be used to pick up the shuttle but a good starting place may be to visualize a "U". As mentioned earlier, the easiest retrieval position of the shuttle for most individuals is to have the shuttle pointing toward you (the cork is closest to you). The simplest contact position of the shuttle with the racket may be anywhere from the 8 o'clock to the 9 o'clock position when attempting a forehand retrieval. To minimize the chance of error, rather than initiating the scooping motion from a high altitude, get down to the ground and lay the side of the racket on the ground almost touching the shuttle. The shaft of the racket is parallel to the floor with the 9 o'clock (or chosen) position touching the floor. The forehand stringbed surface is facing the shuttle and is perpendicular to the floor. The frame of the racket is almost touching the feather of the bird. The cork of the shuttle is also almost touching the frame but is a centimetre further away due to the outward slope of the feather and the desire to have the shaft-frame parallel to the longitudinal axis of the shuttle. Starting from such a low position, the visualized "U" becomes more of a visualized "J" that has been reflected in the y-axis. Now rotate that racket head rapidly using either fingers and/or wrist. When you commence rotation, rotate the part of the racket closer to your body at a faster rate than the part of the racket further from your body-- you will see the racket head approaching the cork of the shuttle at a quicker rate than the part of the racket further away from your body approaching the feather tip although the latter has started out closer to the shuttle. If the shuttle was succesfully on the strings but fell off then you have succeeded. From here, it is a simple matter of re-correcting the angle of the racket face after you have determined that your ascension angle was too steep or decreasing the angle of ascent of the racket head in the first place (after contact with the shuttle is made).

    This is step 1 of picking up the shuttle. You must then practice your angles of descent, the speeds of descent, angles of ascent, speeds of ascent, which will allow you a scooping motion for every situation.

    It has been suggested to me that the retrieval motion of the shuttle is similar to the circular/arc-like rotational motions used in tai chi. Practicing martial arts that emphasize circular motions may also assist in the proper motion required to retrieve the shuttle.

    Then again, it has also been suggested to me by this same individual that the true sign of a badminton master is the ability to retrieve the shuttle while lifting one foot with your hand to your shoulder level and holding it there.

    The "three very important techniques" that were mentioned earlier in this thread are rather important and should be the main focus of your badminton training-- although the first of the three may not serve as much practical purpose and may be more for showmanship purposes.

    One possible ranking of badminton skill levels is as follows:

    Beginner - cannot pick up a shuttle and cannot catch the shuttle
    Intermediate - can pick up a shuttle or catch the shuttle
    Advanced - (can pick up a shuttle and catch the shuttle) OR (can pick up a shuttle when the shuttle is facing a specified direction with a specified part of the racket head from the 7 o'clock to 5 o'clock position)

    Typically, the most difficult retrieval position of the shuttle is when its longitudinal axis is perpendicular to the stringbed. The most difficult retrieval position on the racket head is usually the 12 o'clock position.

    When you've mastered picking up the shuttle, you'll be able to pick it up in any position on almost any surface (maybe not quicksand) using both forehand and backhand retrievals.

    Do not be complacent once you're able to pick it up using either the forehand or backhand but not both. If the shuttle is pointing to the left you will find it very difficult to pick up the shuttle if you have not mastered the backhand retrieval. Also, strive not to be one of those individuals who pokes and prods at the shuttle until it lies in a direction you're comfortable with picking it up in (e.g. rotating the shuttle until it faces you). A lesser opponent and/or teammate who is unable to retrieve the shuttle may not know any better but the observant enemy will have less respect for your abilities and a skilled partner may lose confidence in your team's ability to win matches. Also, strive not to be one of those individuals who "walks around" until the shuttle is in a comfortable orientation to be retrieved. Many of the great badminton champions of the past have left the shuttle on the floor, after having had it passed to them by their opponents, feigning fatigue and/or an attempt to change the pace of the game by walking around for a few seconds before picking up the shuttle but when careful observation reveals that these champions may have simply been play-acting fatigue to better orient themselves to retrieve the shuttle, respect for their badminton skills is diminished.

    Perhaps you are thinking: "Shouldn't I be working more on my backhand or my around-the-head, etc?" Then you must ask yourself what truly determines a skilled player? All of the common strokes used during a rally are relative to your opponent. Your 20 km/h smash may seem abyssmal if your opponent is smashing at 200 km/h but compared to an opponent smashing at 5 km/h, you have an excellent smash. Also, a strong opponent is able to take away some of your abilities and make you look foolish-- against a strong opponent, you may never have the time and chance for a full windup/backswing allowing you to generate those powerful 20 km/h smashes and may instead be forced to resort to quick smashes that are only able to reach speeds of 15 km/h.

    But when the rally is over and there you are, catching or picking up the shuttle with all of the spotlights on you... that is when you are able to display your true skill in the game. Everyone has something resembling a smash; even if it never goes over the net or always lands out. Similarly, everyone has something resembling a drop shot (sometimes made unwittingly). These are all basic skills and how good they look and how good you feel about them will depend on your interactions and observations of other players.

    Not everyone can pick up the bird though! So strive to become at least an intermediate player-- if after many years of training you are still unable to progress past beginner level then (without wanting to sound discouraging) perhaps it is best to consider taking up another sport.

  3. #37
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    make sure not to grip too tightly on your racquet while picking up the birdie also. Your grip should be almost as if you are not tightening at all. Have loose grip, just like when you are resting your racquet on the palms, and as everyone else has outlined, manipulate your fingers. Took me a year to do this lol. Also, when I felt nervous, I couldn't pick them up because I tightened my grip so much. Let loose, and scoop away like everyone else has said =)

  4. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by quisitor
    The shuttle can be picked up with any part of the racket head with the exception of possibly the 6 o'clock position since it is difficult to get that part of the frame low enough to scoop up the shuttle due to the size of the handle being too large to allow for the racket to lie perfectly flat.

    The most difficult contact position for successfully picking up the shuttle may be the 12 o'clock position of the frame as the standard flowing rotational motion used may become more of a digging motion due to the limitations of joint rotation in certain directions when using standard grips on the racket.

    Do not fret however-- picking up the shuttle using the 12 o'clock position of the racket head can be easily mastered though it is not recommended you start out employing this contact point as even if the shuttle is successfully retrieved, control tends to be inferior, where the primary determinant of control for picking up the shuttle is measured as the minimization of bounce of the shuttle on the racket strings during the retrieval process (one aims to master the art of picking up the shuttle with zero bounce). As a side note, the secondary determinant is the minimization of movement of the shuttle on the strings during retrieval (i.e. picking up the shuttle on certain main/cross strings and having it rest on them without the shuttle rolling around). Higher-order determinants may include scooping the shuttle along a specified path at a specified speed to reach a specified destination using one motion (i.e. without first having the shuttle come to rest).

    The 1 o'clock to 5 o'clock positions used are commonly referenced as picking it up on the backhand though the shuttle can be retrieved using a backhand or forehand grip and using the forehand stringbed face or the backhand stringbed face. Similarly, the 7 o'clock to 11 o'clock positions are referenced as forehand retrievals. The 12 o'clock position is symmetrical so does not fall into either category though many would suggest it belongs in the forehand category.

    Picking up the shuttle takes different lengths of training for different individuals. Do not be discouraged if it takes you a few days, a few weeks or even a few months of constant, rigorous practice. It's all about dedication to the sport and perseverance.

    As mentioned earlier, the shuttle can be retrieved using mainly fingers, mainly wrist or a combination of both. Advantages of using primarily finger power include increased control in the sense of first and second determinants as outlined above though higher-order determinants would be difficult indeed. Due to the limits of finger power, it is less likely excessive power will be used in scooping the shuttle thus preventing the shuttle from bouncing on the strings and/or falling off. A clenched fist also reduces the potential for excess power being used but may still result in the shuttle unsuccessfully being picked up if an emphasis on proper scooping motion is not observed. The standard grips used in play may provide the most potential for successful control as measured by all of the determinants. For the former two methods it is best to apply high levels of pressure throughout the scooping motion whereas for the latter it may be best to employ a relaxed wrist and then a contracted wrist at the moment of impact.

    Deception may be limited if using the finger methodology depending on the number of fingers used. If the racket is held only in the thumb and the index finger then it may be likely that slight alteration in the gripping position be made between the forehand and backhand retrievals. Thus for the purposes of deception-- maintaining the same grip position for forehand and backhand retrievals-- a minimum of two fingers and a thumb may be required.

    Visualization is important. See yourself scooping up the bird and the proper motion required. Almost any motion can be used to pick up the shuttle but a good starting place may be to visualize a "U". As mentioned earlier, the easiest retrieval position of the shuttle for most individuals is to have the shuttle pointing toward you (the cork is closest to you). The simplest contact position of the shuttle with the racket may be anywhere from the 8 o'clock to the 9 o'clock position when attempting a forehand retrieval. To minimize the chance of error, rather than initiating the scooping motion from a high altitude, get down to the ground and lay the side of the racket on the ground almost touching the shuttle. The shaft of the racket is parallel to the floor with the 9 o'clock (or chosen) position touching the floor. The forehand stringbed surface is facing the shuttle and is perpendicular to the floor. The frame of the racket is almost touching the feather of the bird. The cork of the shuttle is also almost touching the frame but is a centimetre further away due to the outward slope of the feather and the desire to have the shaft-frame parallel to the longitudinal axis of the shuttle. Starting from such a low position, the visualized "U" becomes more of a visualized "J" that has been reflected in the y-axis. Now rotate that racket head rapidly using either fingers and/or wrist. When you commence rotation, rotate the part of the racket closer to your body at a faster rate than the part of the racket further from your body-- you will see the racket head approaching the cork of the shuttle at a quicker rate than the part of the racket further away from your body approaching the feather tip although the latter has started out closer to the shuttle. If the shuttle was succesfully on the strings but fell off then you have succeeded. From here, it is a simple matter of re-correcting the angle of the racket face after you have determined that your ascension angle was too steep or decreasing the angle of ascent of the racket head in the first place (after contact with the shuttle is made).

    This is step 1 of picking up the shuttle. You must then practice your angles of descent, the speeds of descent, angles of ascent, speeds of ascent, which will allow you a scooping motion for every situation.

    It has been suggested to me that the retrieval motion of the shuttle is similar to the circular/arc-like rotational motions used in tai chi. Practicing martial arts that emphasize circular motions may also assist in the proper motion required to retrieve the shuttle.

    Then again, it has also been suggested to me by this same individual that the true sign of a badminton master is the ability to retrieve the shuttle while lifting one foot with your hand to your shoulder level and holding it there.

    The "three very important techniques" that were mentioned earlier in this thread are rather important and should be the main focus of your badminton training-- although the first of the three may not serve as much practical purpose and may be more for showmanship purposes.

    One possible ranking of badminton skill levels is as follows:

    Beginner - cannot pick up a shuttle and cannot catch the shuttle
    Intermediate - can pick up a shuttle or catch the shuttle
    Advanced - (can pick up a shuttle and catch the shuttle) OR (can pick up a shuttle when the shuttle is facing a specified direction with a specified part of the racket head from the 7 o'clock to 5 o'clock position)

    Typically, the most difficult retrieval position of the shuttle is when its longitudinal axis is perpendicular to the stringbed. The most difficult retrieval position on the racket head is usually the 12 o'clock position.

    When you've mastered picking up the shuttle, you'll be able to pick it up in any position on almost any surface (maybe not quicksand) using both forehand and backhand retrievals.

    Do not be complacent once you're able to pick it up using either the forehand or backhand but not both. If the shuttle is pointing to the left you will find it very difficult to pick up the shuttle if you have not mastered the backhand retrieval. Also, strive not to be one of those individuals who pokes and prods at the shuttle until it lies in a direction you're comfortable with picking it up in (e.g. rotating the shuttle until it faces you). A lesser opponent and/or teammate who is unable to retrieve the shuttle may not know any better but the observant enemy will have less respect for your abilities and a skilled partner may lose confidence in your team's ability to win matches. Also, strive not to be one of those individuals who "walks around" until the shuttle is in a comfortable orientation to be retrieved. Many of the great badminton champions of the past have left the shuttle on the floor, after having had it passed to them by their opponents, feigning fatigue and/or an attempt to change the pace of the game by walking around for a few seconds before picking up the shuttle but when careful observation reveals that these champions may have simply been play-acting fatigue to better orient themselves to retrieve the shuttle, respect for their badminton skills is diminished.

    Perhaps you are thinking: "Shouldn't I be working more on my backhand or my around-the-head, etc?" Then you must ask yourself what truly determines a skilled player? All of the common strokes used during a rally are relative to your opponent. Your 20 km/h smash may seem abyssmal if your opponent is smashing at 200 km/h but compared to an opponent smashing at 5 km/h, you have an excellent smash. Also, a strong opponent is able to take away some of your abilities and make you look foolish-- against a strong opponent, you may never have the time and chance for a full windup/backswing allowing you to generate those powerful 20 km/h smashes and may instead be forced to resort to quick smashes that are only able to reach speeds of 15 km/h.

    But when the rally is over and there you are, catching or picking up the shuttle with all of the spotlights on you... that is when you are able to display your true skill in the game. Everyone has something resembling a smash; even if it never goes over the net or always lands out. Similarly, everyone has something resembling a drop shot (sometimes made unwittingly). These are all basic skills and how good they look and how good you feel about them will depend on your interactions and observations of other players.

    Not everyone can pick up the bird though! So strive to become at least an intermediate player-- if after many years of training you are still unable to progress past beginner level then (without wanting to sound discouraging) perhaps it is best to consider taking up another sport.
    wow! this looks more like a thesis in one's final phd paper. well done!

  5. #39
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    yeah~ managed to scoop up e cork using e above mentioned tips. Used 2 days but it's still not perfect. Noticed tht I always scratch my racquet when I scoop.. Any suggestions?

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    What are you talking about?! This is a THESIS!! Well Done!

    Quote Originally Posted by Kamen
    wow! this looks more like a thesis in one's final phd paper. well done!

  7. #41
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    yeah~ managed to scoop up e cork using e above mentioned tips. Used 2 days but it's still not perfect. Noticed tht I always scratch my racquet when I scoop.. Any suggestions?
    I used to have problems with scratching my racquet, but what I think (not sure about this though) is as I said earlier, having a loose grip will put less pressure on the racquet when you scoop it up, therefore it won't impact on the ground harder I hope it makes sense lol. Also, make sure you are scooping in a rather whipping like motion while manipulating your fingers quickly so that you don't scoop it too long and end up scratching your racquet. Usually if you do it right, your racquet shouldn't scratch on a gym/wooden floor. But on cement and concrete...it's bound to get scratched, no matter what

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    u dont have to touch the floor with rackets to do but you'll quickly catch on as practise isn't hard i can now pick it up with any part of the head /backwards/through the legs/round the back watever oh yer and thers another way 2 do it by tapping the top feathers of the shuttle well with the racket it bounces to the air and you catch it -nice

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    Hmm.. tried just that and well, it's still the same..and at times couldnt scoop...

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkinJapan
    there are three very important techniques in badminton you must master.

    1. Spinning the racket on your finger where the shaft meets the head.
    2. "catching" a shuttle in the air with your racket.
    and finally,
    3. being able to pick up the shuttle off the floor with your racket.

    Practice hard!
    I can never do No. 1 (I've been playing for almost 16 years and still can't do it! ) Any tips?

    I can get it to spin probably twice at best!

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    I really Don't recomment doin #1 cuz the possibility of you dropping ur racquet is VERY high, since the racquet MUST spin @ a fairly high speed in order to keep the momentum to rotate to the next spin. and with that Speed, and Droping ur racquet @ that Speed the chances of Scratches are FOR sure, and it might even cuz internal damge do the racquet.

    Btw i recomment praticing the Scooping bird thing on Carpet first, with the Cork facing up, that is the Easiest position to scoop a bird, then when u start to feel more comfortable about it, pick up the bird when its Cork is facing downwards. And finally take away the carpet when u have mastered the Carpet training

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    Quote Originally Posted by Yipom
    I really Don't recomment doin #1 cuz the possibility of you dropping ur racquet is VERY high, since the racquet MUST spin @ a fairly high speed in order to keep the momentum to rotate to the next spin. and with that Speed, and Droping ur racquet @ that Speed the chances of Scratches are FOR sure, and it might even cuz internal damge do the racquet.

    Btw i recomment praticing the Scooping bird thing on Carpet first, with the Cork facing up, that is the Easiest position to scoop a bird, then when u start to feel more comfortable about it, pick up the bird when its Cork is facing downwards. And finally take away the carpet when u have mastered the Carpet training
    I totally agree.

    And if you are right handed, and just starting, I recommend using 10:30 o'clock of your racket.

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    Default Tricks!!!

    These are my favourite. I can do all of them, but one that i can't is hitting the bird at knee height, with your back against the net. Or a jump underleg hit with your back to the net. But the scooping is easy. Just have a swift smooth motion. Use your wrist to turn the racket and scoop the birdy to the side of the rim. At around 9 o'clock. Don't push or the bird with go sideways. Just scoop smoothly. Catching the bird in mid air is also easy. It requires coordination. Watch the bird fall and imitate the fall with your racket. Then slow down your racket with there impact. And there u have it.

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    You mean on contact, if there is impact then the bird will bounce off the string.

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    Default how you pick up the bird with your racket?

    where you guys position your racket when you pick up the shuttle from the floor?


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    i just put the racquet rim next to the cork on the side and just a small flick of the wrist to fling the birdie to whereever.... lol... im not an expert but it works for me.... my little brother learned it in like 2 trys... i would guess scooping the birdie onto the racquet and not fling it might be a little more challenging... the racquet doesnt get scratched from doing this from what i see...

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    i can do it fast or slow, on most positions of the frame, without touching the floor.

    i don't find a problem with returning the shuttle to opponents as long as the return was tasteful.
    if i'm close, i usually reach under the net with my racquet and toss the shuttle to my opponent.
    if they're far, i usually gently lob it to the appropriate side of the serving T.

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