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View Poll Results: Why do you need a new racquet?

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1707. You may not vote on this poll
  • Broke your current racquet

    212 12.42%
  • Just wanted to get the latest cool racquet

    193 11.31%
  • Add to your collection of racquets

    130 7.62%
  • It's a classic, I must have it!!!!!!!

    43 2.52%
  • Need a back-up

    220 12.89%
  • Impulse buy!!!!!!!!

    131 7.67%
  • The racquet was made for me so I must have another just in case I break my first

    102 5.98%
  • Curious to try a racquet everyone was talking about

    210 12.30%
  • A little of everything mentioned

    466 27.30%
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  1. #358
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    I look for new racquets when the ones I have are getting old.You'll know when "their time has come".Before their time has come,they start losing sweet spots;you can't really get much power out of them.So,when the times like that comes I start looking for back ups.

  2. #359
    Regular Member bos_dc2's Avatar
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    it's an addiction

  3. #360
    Regular Member Naim.F.C's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beermonstertw View Post
    I look for new racquets when the ones I have are getting old.You'll know when "their time has come".Before their time has come,they start losing sweet spots;you can't really get much power out of them.So,when the times like that comes I start looking for back ups.
    Pretty sure this is not true. The only real change will be in the strings and grip, not the racket. Which is why you should change grips fairly often unless you play better with a worn and compressed grip.

    But rackets themselves don't really change unless you've damaged one. There are rackets I've picked up, Tennis and Badminton alike, which I've re gripped and strung after a long hiatus and then used which feel like new. I can confirm this because I often keep a back up racket, one that is barely ever used, versus one that I always use. The one that I always use, despite countless hours of play time, still plays exactly the same as the new version of the same racket.

    Yonex, Victor etc would love to have you believe rackets degrade with use, but they really don't. And if they did, i'd be asking for my money back. Because with the absurd, stupendously marked up prices these companies are charging these days, they should last a lifetime unless genuinely abused.

    Honestly, placebo, materialism, addiction, curiosity, boredom, appreciation for the new etc are all reasons people consistently buy new rackets, but a logical person would just experiment till he finds his ideal, then stick with those.

    Personally I'm fine with one aggressive demanding racket (VT80) and one aggressive but more accommodating (MX80, JJS, MX90) and maybe one more for easy play if I don't want to strain myself or want speed over power (Bravesword 12 etc). Chances are when I build my stamina back up, the VT80 will be my go to once again. Still the best overall racket imo, if your skill level or stamina is accommodating.
    Last edited by Naim.F.C; 01-14-2014 at 04:27 PM.

  4. #361
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    It's not widely known or discussed, but if you talk to experienced older players and racket designers (eg. Dinkalot), you'll find that the shaft will become more flexible over a few years of use.

    Reason is that repeated movement and flexion of the shaft causes the carbon to weaken and soften over time.

  5. #362
    Regular Member Naim.F.C's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    It's not widely known or discussed, but if you talk to experienced older players and racket designers (eg. Dinkalot), you'll find that the shaft will become more flexible over a few years of use.

    Reason is that repeated movement and flexion of the shaft causes the carbon to weaken and soften over time.
    Scientifically that is sound, depending on how you look at it. You could look at the initial stiffness of a new racket as one that is not properly worn in, and a well used racket worn in and at its true form. A bit like a Plasma TV where the phosphors need to age. I doubt the materials inside will continually compress to an infinite degree, rather to a particular threshold only, that is, compress to add some margin of added flexibility over time. Not to the extent a stiff racket is going to turn flimsy mind. I'm talking a 10% compression or flex difference at best over a massive period of time. But it would be nice to have a scientific study behind this.

  6. #363
    Regular Member gundamzaku's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Naim.F.C View Post
    Pretty sure this is not true. The only real change will be in the strings and grip, not the racket. Which is why you should change grips fairly often unless you play better with a worn and compressed grip.

    But rackets themselves don't really change unless you've damaged one. There are rackets I've picked up, Tennis and Badminton alike, which I've re gripped and strung after a long hiatus and then used which feel like new. I can confirm this because I often keep a back up racket, one that is barely ever used, versus one that I always use. The one that I always use, despite countless hours of play time, still plays exactly the same as the new version of the same racket.

    Yonex, Victor etc would love to have you believe rackets degrade with use, but they really don't. And if they did, i'd be asking for my money back. Because with the absurd, stupendously marked up prices these companies are charging these days, they should last a lifetime unless genuinely abused.

    Honestly, placebo, materialism, addiction, curiosity, boredom, appreciation for the new etc are all reasons people consistently buy new rackets, but a logical person would just experiment till he finds his ideal, then stick with those.

    Personally I'm fine with one aggressive demanding racket (VT80) and one aggressive but more accommodating (MX80, JJS, MX90) and maybe one more for easy play if I don't want to strain myself or want speed over power (Bravesword 12 etc). Chances are when I build my stamina back up, the VT80 will be my go to once again. Still the best overall racket imo, if your skill level or stamina is accommodating.
    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    It's not widely known or discussed, but if you talk to experienced older players and racket designers (eg. Dinkalot), you'll find that the shaft will become more flexible over a few years of use.

    Reason is that repeated movement and flexion of the shaft causes the carbon to weaken and soften over time.
    Quote Originally Posted by Naim.F.C View Post
    Scientifically that is sound, depending on how you look at it. You could look at the initial stiffness of a new racket as one that is not properly worn in, and a well used racket worn in and at its true form. A bit like a Plasma TV where the phosphors need to age. I doubt the materials inside will continually compress to an infinite degree, rather to a particular threshold only, that is, compress to add some margin of added flexibility over time. Not to the extent a stiff racket is going to turn flimsy mind. I'm talking a 10% compression or flex difference at best over a massive period of time. But it would be nice to have a scientific study behind this.

    very interesting... i would love to hear from the "scientists" who might have an explanation to the two theories?

    i myself am on the fence about which way to lean towards. i am also a member of a bicycle forum and people on that forum mentioned that a carbon bike usually only last up to 5 years...which is scary for me since i can't afford to buy a carbon bike every 15years, let alone 5! the same goes with aluminum bikes but the durability is much longer than just 5yrs.

    at the same time i have personal experience with my rackets that they don't really degrade to the extend that i actually notice one is more worn than another, even when i do play with one a lot more often than the exact same copy of a particular model.

    it seems like both of you made very plausible theories.....
    Last edited by gundamzaku; 01-14-2014 at 06:16 PM. Reason: i'm a fob with bad grammar!

  7. #364
    Regular Member Naim.F.C's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gundamzaku View Post
    very interesting... i would love to hear from the "scientists" who might have an explanation to the two theories?

    i myself am on the fence about which way to lean towards. i am also a member of a bicycle forum and people on that forum mentioned that a carbon bike usually only lst up to 5 years...which is scary for me since i can't afford to buy a carbon bike every 15years, let alone 5! the same goes with aluminum bikes but the durability is much longer than just 5yrs. at the same time i have personal experience with my rackets that they don't really degrade to the extend that i actually notice one is more worn to another, even when i do play with one a lot more often than exact same copy of a particular model.

    it seems like both of you made very plausible theories.....
    As I said above, if the rackets are designed around the worn in stage as optimum performance as oppose to the brand new and still uncompressed stage, I don't think there'd be issues at all. I mean, there are cars, bikes, parts and other important equipment made from carbon fibre, weave and similar materials, so the compression and flex change limit cannot be as dramatic or affecting as certain product manufacturers lead on. Hell, certain vehicles that use parts made from similar materials are stress tested to absurd temperatures and levels, and I'd hope these rackets are too. Otherwise we'd have law suits left and right. Imagine a biker riding down a motorway and his bike falling apart because it was 5 years old. No chance manufacturers would risk it. Like I said, the material will just have a compression threshold unless seriously or uncharacteristically abused.

    Remember, money talks. Businesses thrive on feeding the notion you constantly need the new, when the reality is often quite different.
    Last edited by Naim.F.C; 01-14-2014 at 06:25 PM.

  8. #365
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    Quote Originally Posted by gundamzaku View Post
    very interesting... i would love to hear from the "scientists" who might have an explanation to the two theories?

    i myself am on the fence about which way to lean towards. i am also a member of a bicycle forum and people on that forum mentioned that a carbon bike usually only last up to 5 years...which is scary for me since i can't afford to buy a carbon bike every 15years, let alone 5! the same goes with aluminum bikes but the durability is much longer than just 5yrs.

    at the same time i have personal experience with my rackets that they don't really degrade to the extend that i actually notice one is more worn than another, even when i do play with one a lot more often than the exact same copy of a particular model.

    it seems like both of you made very plausible theories.....
    I asked a colleague of mine who used to compete at a high level and he would change his bicycle after an average amount of kilometers (which I do not remember). He confirmed me that he could feel the flex in his carbon bike and had to change it every 2-3 years.

  9. #366
    Regular Member Naim.F.C's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mendell View Post
    I asked a colleague of mine who used to compete at a high level and he would change his bicycle after an average amount of kilometers (which I do not remember). He confirmed me that he could feel the flex in his carbon bike and had to change it every 2-3 years.
    Either he's bought in to placebo or he rides so hard that he's cracked or damaged the frame.

    There's an excellent thread about the life span of carbon fibre here.

    http://bicycles.stackexchange.com/qu...rame-life-span

    Some choice findings from the different studies.

    "For carbon forks in general, there should not be any limited life span, as carbon composites themselves are not subject to fatigue failures as metals are. So the fatigue life of a properly made carbon composite is 'infinite'."

    " There is no limitation because carbon has a natural flexibility. It can be used a hundred years while maintaining the same stiffness."

    " The good news is the fatigue life of carbon fiber is immensely more than that of metals. While the writer expresses concern about his carbon fork lasting as long as a metal component, there is nothing to worry about in terms of fatigue life on a composite fork."

    Sounds like more marketing misinformation has been regurgitated imo. Happens in every single hobby. Audiophiles will know this too well, as will videophiles and the like. The entire industry revolves around marketing misinformation, to feed in to curiosity, doubt etc. I should know... I'm in it by trade lol.

  10. #367
    Regular Member gundamzaku's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mendell View Post
    I asked a colleague of mine who used to compete at a high level and he would change his bicycle after an average amount of kilometers (which I do not remember). He confirmed me that he could feel the flex in his carbon bike and had to change it every 2-3 years.
    8-10k per bike at 2-3yrs per bike, that is some hobby, or he's a semi pro?

  11. #368
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    Quote Originally Posted by gundamzaku View Post
    8-10k per bike at 2-3yrs per bike, that is some hobby, or he's a semi pro?
    I guess you could say that he used to be a semi pro. He did many races (if it is how it's called) In Canada and the US. Now it's only a hobby for him (getting old... nearing 40 :-P).

  12. #369
    Regular Member craigandy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Naim.F.C View Post
    As I said above, if the rackets are designed around the worn in stage as optimum performance as oppose to the brand new and still uncompressed stage, I don't think there'd be issues at all. I mean, there are cars, bikes, parts and other important equipment made from carbon fibre, weave and similar materials, so the compression and flex change limit cannot be as dramatic or affecting as certain product manufacturers lead on. Hell, certain vehicles that use parts made from similar materials are stress tested to absurd temperatures and levels, and I'd hope these rackets are too. Otherwise we'd have law suits left and right. Imagine a biker riding down a motorway and his bike falling apart because it was 5 years old. No chance manufacturers would risk it. Like I said, the material will just have a compression threshold unless seriously or uncharacteristically abused.

    Remember, money talks. Businesses thrive on feeding the notion you constantly need the new, when the reality is often quite different.
    A guy was whacking on one night that his NS9900 had become too flexible for him(just under 2 year old). He hits hard! I natuarally assumed he was talking rubbish so I asked to have a look. He had 2 other spare NS9900 and I had a VT80 in my hands well used heavily by me (rated stiff, NS9900 extra stiff). I felt it, hit with it and can confirm the flex on the shaft had become far greater than the other 3 rackets I mentioned.

  13. #370
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    ^ Yep, that's how I felt with my previous MX70 rackets and now my XP70 rackets. The favourite spec ones that I play often with feel slightly flexier on bending and hitting. Maybe not noticeable to those players who're used to flexier rackets but for someone used to stiff rackets, it's there.

  14. #371
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    I still using N90 1st generation , just recently bought MX90, as its very popular in forum , buy to try it out ...

  15. #372
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    The final carbon fibre that we are referring to is made up for layers of carbon fibre sheet bonded by resin. The actual carbon fibre may have "infinite" fatigue life compared to metal but I think the resin is subjected to degradation.

  16. #373
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    Has anyone mentioned this reason for needing a new racket?

    To add to the repetoire of excuses for my horrible, never-improving play: "I am just getting used to this new racket/string/grip/shoe/shoelace/glass eye/daylight savings time/ etc...."

  17. #374
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    LMFAOOO daylight savings time had me dying LOL its gonna be my new excuse now

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