User Tag List

Page 1 of 13 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 LastLast
Results 1 to 17 of 217
  1. #1
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    253
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Unhappy Higher tension for more power?

    Hello. I'm on a debate here with a friend who claims that with higher tension, you get more power and less control. Lower tension, you get more control and less power.

    I think otherwise. Can someone here help out?

  2. #2
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Basement Boiler Room
    Posts
    22,118
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    it's individual dependent but here is what a pro (p. gade) said:

    Q: You have one of the hardest string tensions in the sport. What are the benefits?
    A: My precision and power increases. I feel comfortable with high tensions.

  3. #3
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    253
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Originally posted by cooler
    it's individual dependent but here is what a pro (p. gade) said:

    Q: You have one of the hardest string tensions in the sport. What are the benefits?
    A: My precision and power increases. I feel comfortable with high tensions.
    Here's my humble opinion:

    With high tension, you get good control which brings about precision. That means I can control or hit the bird to where I want it to go more accurately. Power? I think you can generate power as long as you have a strong arm and good timing on the swing, but I'm sure you can generate more power with lower tension string. With lower tension, I don't mean 15lbs but something more in the range of 18-20lbs.

  4. #4
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    649
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    higher tension actually increases the power... when you contact the bird, if it's a lower tension, what happens is the strings give more way and don't provide a solid feel compared to one of a higher tension.. (kinda hard to explain).... higher tensions though result in more broken strings...

  5. #5
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    253
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Originally posted by Nanashi
    higher tension actually increases the power... when you contact the bird, if it's a lower tension, what happens is the strings give more way and don't provide a solid feel compared to one of a higher tension.. (kinda hard to explain).... higher tensions though result in more broken strings...
    Don't you think with lower tension, there is this "tramboline" or "bounce" effect that increases power? With higher tension, there is less "bounce", therefore, producing a more accurate shot. So far, I've experimented with this and it seems to be true. I'm able to produce more accurate shots with higher tension stringing but less power. That means I have to use more physical strength to have a harder smash or clear.

    One recent example would be my MP100. When it was new, the string was at 24lbs. Sure it produces pretty good power. Now that the string has lost some it's tension (about 20lbs now I guess), I'm able to produce really loud pop and fast smashes. However, I find that my shots are not as accurate.

  6. #6
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    1,004
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I know this topic has been discussed a number of times before, but I still don't have a complete picture up to this moment. I would really like to see someone to come up with a more throughout explanation of this topic.

    Based on my personal experience, I found more power with higher string tension until it goes up to 25 lbs (exact figure vary with different string). In fact, I think string tension at 22 lbs or below is too low, i.e. my smashes will become too weak with this level of string tension.

    I'm not good in physics even though I had studied it in high school, but I do think there should have at least 2 forces in the equation which compensate each other.

    Tramboline effect is definitely existed - e.g. it is very obvious in "bounce bed". On the other hand, imagine if you drop a ball from very high to the ground, the ball will likely be bounced higher if it hits a solid floor in compare with hitting a soft ground (like those soft floor for children's playground). These two real life examples seem to be contradicted with each other.

    In fact, another thing which bother me is the relationship of stiffness and power.

    For control, I think people define this term subjectively - some people may think that harder string bounce more so that it is more difficult to control the shuttle. On the other hand, pros may think that harder string allows them to control the shuttle with higher precision because they get use to it. When we say "better control", it really means different thing for different people in most cases.

  7. #7
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    34
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I dont know if this helps but 23 lbs I hit harder then I do with 20 pounds.

  8. #8
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Vancouver, Canada
    Posts
    2,358
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    This has been discussed before in various threads and I don't think you will see an agreement.

    One thing to consider is what is considered "high tension". Are we talking about anything below 24lbs to be low tension and anything above that to be high tension?

    The other factor involved is the thickness of the string. Steve Crandall of Ashaway has written a number of articles on string and the effects of different tensions.

    In summary, Steve Crandall provide the following table:

    thin string/low tension = higher power, lower control, medium durability

    thin string/high tension = medium power, medium control, low durability

    thick string/low tension = medium power, medium control, high durability

    thick string/high tension = lower power, higher control, medium durability

  9. #9
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Posts
    3,342
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    In any case, it will be hard to find anyone that argues that lower tension gives more control, so I guess you can say your friend is wrong.

  10. #10
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    182
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Is...

    Is a thin string considered 0.68mm and lower? I usually use 0.68mm strings. When the racquet has been just strung, control is very good. Smashes are slightly not as powerful but very precise. Sweetspot is definitely smaller.

  11. #11
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Basement Boiler Room
    Posts
    22,118
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    from gladius post before, we must differentiate between control and feel of a shuttle. I think control has different meaning to different people

  12. #12
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    353
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Check out this article, it talks about some pretty interesting facts and some experiments did take parts to prove the fact.

    http://hcs.harvard.edu/~badmintn/ioi/Tension.html


    oh yeah, dont forget to check out their "coach's corner" too

  13. #13
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    253
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I agree with Chu Pa and the table provided by Winex West Canada of Steve Crandall seems very reasonable to me.

  14. #14
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    31
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Theoretically there should be no difference in work delivered to the bird. Basically, the work is directly related to the distance the strings deflect (or 'bounce' as it was referred to earlier in this thread) and the tension of the strings. As you know, assuming elastic stretching of the strings (plastic stretching would mean your strings become permanently elongated), the distance the strings will deflect will be directly related to the tension of the strings as well. In effect, and difference in tension will cancel itself out.

    Regarding control, there is theoretical difference either. Realistically, there is an apparent difference. When you have loose strings, the direction of the raquet swing will manifest itself stronger in that particular direction (because of the distance that the strings have to rebound, the bird is projected in that direction at a steeper angle). With higher tensions, the bird is not propelled at as steep an angle because the deflection of the strings will not be as great. Therefore there is an appearance of greater control. What is really happening, is that higher tensions are more forgiving, and you have to really angle your raquet to change the direction of the birds.

    Regarding realistic work, high tensions (basically greater forces of the string against each other and against the frame) mean that the friction will increase. This transforms much more power into heat through friction, which is also the reason why (on average) higher tensions will break more often.

    So what should be expected (or at least I do) is that higher tensions will decrease power after a certain point. It's quite obvious that ultra low tensions can be deflected so easily that the rate of work returned by the raquet (power) is much too low to be useful. Control becomes much more forgiving (and in effect 'better') at higher tensions.

    That's what I think anyways....

    -Curtis

  15. #15
    New Member
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Manitoba, Canada
    Posts
    2
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    It is interesting to see people talking about tensions above and below 24 lbs. If I am not mistaken very few racquets are rated above 22-23 lbs as the recommended tension. To me 24 lbs is way over the top. For me above 21 is high tension. Below 18 is low tension. Between is typical. At the Pan American games I saw guys stringing above 25 lbs but they were breaking racquets left right and center. Mind you they had 10 more in their bag exactly the same so it really was not an issue for them.

    The discussion about the thickenss of the string had some good points. I have never thought about string thickness but I am sure it plays a factor in this discussion.

    I think another factor that needs to be considered is how hard you swing. For someone very hard the tension of the racquet will have a different effect than someone like me that has more average racquet speed. I think what comes into play is how much the strings flex when you stike the bird or the 'trampoline effect' that is mentioned in the discussion groups. I think a tension of 19 or 20 for me will flex about the same as a tension of 22/23 for the person that generates more racquet speed. So different tensions will feel the same for the harder swinger and me. When my racquet is at 19 or 20 I have more 'pop' in my smash then when it is is at 16- 17. As for control I am not really sure. I know it feels like the bird stays on my racquet longer when it is around 17/18 lbs but because I can't get the pop at that tension it is hard to tell. For me, when my racquet is 20+ I have less touch around the net than when it is 17-18 lbs. I find the higher tensions more (bouncy) and I am more likely to a poor shot when I am trying a tight net shot. Because of this I say higher tension gives me less control and more power.

    It would be interesting to know what top ranked players in the world use. If the Pan Am players are any indication they string at what I consider to be very high tension. I think it is safe to assume that they find that best for them. But again their racquet speeds are way above the typical player so the same rules may not apply.

    BTW, I am the friend that Xuser mentioned to start this discussion.

  16. #16
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    2,177
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I think i can safely say that i'm 1 of those who likes having my rackets strung at higher tensions.

    I string all my rackets at 24x26lbs. The reason for me to string it at this tension is different. I like my tension high, i feel that i can get just the same amount of power out of 26lbs as i can with my previous 22lbs.

    Also, we all know that the tension will drop after being strung at the initial tension. So i string it at 26lbs, play with it and it will drop to around 24lbs. It will stick around there. This is my reason for playing with this tension.

    But honestly speaking i can say that at a lower tension, you can get more power, well at least it feels that way.

  17. #17
    New Member
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Manitoba, Canada
    Posts
    2
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    To Byro-Nenium (and anyone else)
    That is interesting that you string that tight. Do have rouble with racquets breaking? How about strings? What kind of racquet and string do you use? Do feel that when it is that tight that there is more stress on your elbow because the racquet translates more of the shock of hitting to you arm than absorbing the shock? Would you consider yourself to have a very hard smash or an average smash? I have found that racquets sttrung that tight feel like a board when I hit it. But it has been at least a half dozen years since I got my racquet stung at 21+ so posibly the newer designs might make a difference. Interesting the local fellow that sells and repairs racquets was saying that when you buy a racquet off the self and it is already strung that typically they are strung at 26+ and with poor quality string. I wonder if the reason for that would be the same as yours. After sitting on the self and a few weeks of play the tension would drop of to the low 20's and be where it should be. I will have to give it a try

Page 1 of 13 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Why do people use a higher tension and get more power?
    By xrawrhenry in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 81
    : 07-11-2013, 05:39 AM
  2. getting use to higher tension
    By Capnx in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 26
    : 07-12-2008, 09:29 AM
  3. Higher tension = rip easier?
    By ionoo in forum Badminton String
    Replies: 12
    : 01-05-2007, 09:27 PM
  4. Higher tension for more power?
    By Xuser in forum General Forum
    Replies: 4
    : 05-07-2002, 02:28 PM
  5. Higher Tension = More Power?
    By Jeff in forum General Forum
    Replies: 2
    : 05-16-2001, 07:11 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •